Need advice on laying sewer line in backyard

I have been having problems with my sewer line in my backyard. In the past, I have made some spot repairs (i.e., replacing sections of ceramic pipe that cracked with PVC pipe). With the continuing problems, I have decided to replace the entire length of ceramic pipe with PVC. I have uncovered about 20 feet of pipe and found problems with roots, cracled pipe and poor slope. I am glad I am doing this as these problems would continue otherwise.
My questions are:
1. Are there any web sites for the diy'er that describes all the details of replacing sewer pipe? I have conducted my searches using Google and have not come up with anything. I thought that if I could get a detailed description, I might pick up some pointers that I am not now considering.
2. I read somewhere that I should surround the newly laid pipe with stones. Is this really necessary? My current pipe is not sitting in a bed of stones as was suggested.
I would appreciate any thoughts or opinions on this job.
Thanks, Al Kondo
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Al Kondo wrote:

Goodness, do a GOOGLE for: laying + sewer + pipe (or similar). There is a wealth of info to wade thru.
FYI, your existing pipe is called "vitrified clay" pipe.
The important thing is to provide a solid bed in the trench, although PVC pipe is much more tolerant of uneveness.
If you carefully remove the existing pipe, the existing bed should be solid and compacted by now so I would just lay the new PVC in it. Run a string down the length firsthand to spot any low spots or poor slope conditions.
Plan on a cleanout fitting somewhere in the run.
Rather than pipe with glued joints, go to a *large building supply yard* and get genuine PVC sewer pipe with O-ring joints. They will take punishment without leaking or breaking. They can fix you up with the necessary Mission couplings at both ends of the run. May even offer some advice...
Jim
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I'll second that, 6" green PVC pipe, with o-rings, and no glue is standard here for house to sewer connections. That (different sizes though) is how they replaced the main lines a couple of years ago.
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On Mon, 25 Oct 2004 17:22:09 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@hal-pc.org (Al Kondo) wrote:

I don't have any specific Web references, but I can give you 3 tips: 1. Use expansion joints. Don't just glue the pipe ends together. 2. Before backfilling, eliminate any large voids under the pipe with soil or small rock. 3. Use solid Sched 40 pipe, not the cellulose core stuff.

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I used to have a boss that said when it comes to sewer lines, there are only three things you need to know, " Sh#t runs downhill, the boss is a SOB, and payday is friday at 5:00". To answer your question, I had old 4 inch tile and each joint had a mass of fine root ball. I dug out enough to slide 10 foot sections of 3 inch pvc sewer pipe in it and heard it crunch every two feet as it went through the root balls. I got it past the known trouble spots of roots and to the drop in the main in alley, then hooked it up to the house. That was 18 years ago and it is still working. The part I dug out I backfilled with sand under and around the pipe and then backfilled with dirt. Don't forget to put in a clean out.
Al Kondo wrote:

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He left your education incomplete. Rule #4:
Don't chew your fingernails!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net
"ZZonka Tonka" <"Spam_Me"@duct_tape_the 8th_wonder of the world.com> wrote in message

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