Need advice on emergency bent trumpet horn repair

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Danny D. wrote:

Hi, I am a life time brass player, still do in a local community band with vintage euphonium. Is it expensive name brand horn? Or just student model Yamaha kind? Regardless take it to a shop they will do a good job so he can be ready for school next month. It looks easy to fix it but believe me, you can mess it up w/o experience and proper tools. I am sure local shops are already busy getting ready for rental program with their inventory.
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Tony, I always knew you were a blow hard.
Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org

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On 8/19/2013 5:44 AM, Danny D. wrote:

Not a DIY job unless you have some metal working experience. Call a musical instrument shop and ank who they use. Alternatively, a shop that does custom body work or restoration or builds custom motorcycles.
If the instrument is of some value, a pro can make it look like new with the right tools. Even a hack can make it without the big bend, but it will be visible.
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On 8/19/2013 10:08 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Yea, the motorcycle shop could even put some flame decals on the horn. ^_^
TDD
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Then, the kid can eat beans and shove the trumpet. Strike a match.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
On 8/19/2013 5:45 PM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

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On 8/19/2013 5:13 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

He should study the technique of this guy. ^_^
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Le_P%C3%A9tomane
TDD
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Dents add character, put a few more in it.
Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org

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My hat's off (and most of my hair) to whomsoever is spoofing me. You're doing better than I.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
On 8/19/2013 11:18 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

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Put the horn on the kid's head, and then hammer. Use his head instead of brass anvil.
Oh, you want to straighten out the horn, not the boy??
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .

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wrote:

Toss it in the garbage and buy an identical one at a music store.
If you cant find a replacement, just wrap it with duct tape and tell the parents a drunken redneck in a rolled over pickup truck, stole it, and you had to beat the guy over the head with it to get it back.
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wrote:

Take or send the trumpet to a professional trumpet-repair place and only to a professional trumpet-repair place. Check with the band department at your local high-school to find out where they take or send their mangled trumpets. A way to work within your two-day time frame might be to flop down a couple of hundred bucks for a replacement instrument. Maybe you'll be able to fool the kid's mother. Best of luck to you and to your grandchild.
I googled for "trumpet bell repair" and got lots of hits.
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pilgrim wrote:

Hi, If it's not an expensive one, just chuck it and get another. You can even buy new one for ~100.00, made in China or India. But then El Cheapo instrument can hinder learning process. They are very stuffy and tonal quality is minimal.
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Fill it with gun powder, add a long fuse. Place it outdoors far from any buildings, light the fuse, and run like hell. When it blows, the dent will be gone. Of course the whole trumpet may be gone too, but that's the risk you take.
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On 8/19/2013 4:44 AM, Danny D. wrote:

I once asked Dizzy Gillespie if he wanted me, a metalworker, to fix his bent horn. He said, "no, I've gotten used to it."
David
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On Mon, 19 Aug 2013 09:44:08 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

Just an opinion, but that wasn't just dropped - it either fell from a great height or was thrown with some vigor.

She still has to be told - it'll go easier on both you and the kid if he just fesses up to it now, versus if she finds out after the fact.
If this trumpet is School Property, they have to be told too - because when the repair shop sees the School Property tag they are going to get a call anyway.
And unless you're sending it back to the OEM Factory for repairs, they probably have their own repair connections. Los Angeles Unified runs their own complete instrument repair shops.

Problem is they need to anneal the metal with a torch flame or a stint in a heat-treat oven to soften it up first, and that means the whole thing needs to be stripped of the old lacquer, buffed out, and clear coated again when it's all done. You can't just hammer it back in shape, the metal will stretch and distort.
The best way would be to unsolder the bell, anneal it, stick it back on the spinning lathe on the original form, and gently spin it back into shape - possibly with a torch shrinking or two, where they heat it up then hit it with a wet cloth to suck in the stretch. That's going to be either the original trumpet maker's factory or someone who has an exact duplicate of the bell form.
Then they solder it back onto the rest of the trumpet, and do the usual strip buff and lacquer on the whole instrument.
Then again, if this is a $99 (No Name) Indonesia Special you toss it out - or give it to the instrument repair guys for spare parts.
Then help the kid into a good Conn or Selmer. They sound a whole lot better, and are far more easily repairable when stuff like this happens again. And it will.
--<< Bruce >>--
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That's easily fixable, and an experienced brass musical instrument technician sees a lot of them like that.
Whether it's cost effective depends on the horn.
I'd guess it will cost $200 to $400 to repair and look like new.
You can get a Chinese import for $150 and they play reasonably well.
A Bach Stradivarius costs $2500 and up.
This is one repair that you can't do yourself. Well, you could, but you're going to mess up the first 50 or so learning.
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On Monday, August 19, 2013 5:44:08 AM UTC-4, Danny D. wrote:

You really should just encase yourself and your entire extended family in cement. The crises never end with you.
Then again you'd have 1000 questions about what kind of cement to use, how to build the forms, yada yada yada.
Shame on you for helping this kid LIE to his parents, your own children!
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote in

Indeed. It looks like this dweeb recently discovered UseNet and digital photography and he wants everyone to know about it. I have him in my KF, so I don't usually see his crap. Has he posted a hundred photos of the trumpet yet?
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You should buy a roller. It rolls out the dents
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Who keeps looking for old posts 2013 to reply to?????
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