Need advice on emergency bent trumpet horn repair

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My grandchild dropped the trumpet, denting the horn:
http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2820/9545819152_6cac58b3d1_o.gif
He was crying up a storm (probably because he doesn't want me to tell his mom).
Do you think the now-bent trumpet can be saved before mom finds out?
http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5500/9543029601_40ebdf135f_o.gif
I have about a day or two before she expects it back...
What tools would straighten the horn out?
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Brass ball peen hammer, brass anvil?
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
On 8/19/2013 5:44 AM, Danny D. wrote:

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Since we cannot buy a brass anvil, i.e. would need to commission that one be constructed, the OP is likely to find professional repair would be cheaper.
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Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
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Heavy sedation for Mom, until the kid can go back to school and get another trumpet? I mean, the school has to have a couple spares. Couple of large denomination bills, for the teacher. And, no one needs to know.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
On 8/19/2013 10:58 AM, Don Phillipson wrote:

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On Mon, 19 Aug 2013 09:44:08 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

If you were anyone else but the grandfather or grandmother, I would say it's not your place to touch it and you should let his parents (or whoever paid for it, decide what to do.)
But still, I don't think there is anything you or I can do that will make it look original, or close enough that she won't notice if she ever picks it up, or if she looks at it while he's playing.
Is there a place that make's trumpets nearby. Maybe they can put it in the form they use in the first place and sqeeze it down again. Or a music store that sells instruments can tell you who repairs them
I would not use a hammer. It will put little dents in on top of the big dent and they will be harder to get out.
If I were trying to do it myself I would get someone who is used to autobody work by hand**, or bending metal in general (I always bend metal, usually until it breaks, before I throw it away.) and have him do it by hand, with his thumbs in just the right place, moving them as necessary.
**I've been able to make a 3 foot dent into a 6" dent, such that the first 2.5 feet look perfect, with my hands or my foot,, but usually I can't get the last 6" with just my hands or if I did, I know t here would be a wrinkle in it. . Of course that is steel and not brass, but it's thinner too.
How old is he? Was he roughhousing or being careless or was it the kind of accident even an adult might have?
How does it sound? Maybe if it has extra sounds, one can get rid of them without fully repairing it.
Can he get by the way it is, until he decides he's serious about the trumpet and would want a better one anyhow?
He seems to have done a lot of damage. Does that mean it's soft and a person can put it back with his thumbs, or did he drop it a long way?
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micky wrote:

Someone tried to bend it back in shape with their fingers. I see fingerprints around the damaged area in the second photo.
This Youtube video shows how a trumpet is made The part of the video that shows how the damaged horn can be repaired starts at 1:38
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yl8qfu-ojTQ

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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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...snip...

The hammering part at 1:40 might be doable as a repair attempt, but there's no way you can spin the trumpet In a lathe. You'll note that all of the lathe work was done when the pipe was still straight. It was the lathe work that smoothed out the hammer marks.
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On 08/19/2013 06:17 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Not to mention that it will need to be annealed first so that the metal doesn't break. Definitely something that needs to go to a professional to be repaired.
OP needs to 'fess up before further damage is done to the instrument.
Jon
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SNIP
Someone tried to bend it back in shape with their fingers. I see fingerprints around the damaged area in the second photo.
This Youtube video shows how a trumpet is made The part of the video that shows how the damaged horn can be repaired starts at 1:38
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yl8qfu-ojTQ

--
Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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Oren wrote:

Just to update - I haven't done anything on this (nobody asked for it yet) ... but I will update when there is action.
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wrote:

A great video.
I see three problems for the OP. Getting it on the lathe with the rest of the trumpet attached. Maybe that can be detached but just disconnecting my water heater pipes wasn't easy.
Getting the temp down to, what, 40 below zero C? I guess that part has been done already.
He may not have enough tattoos.
Maybe someone can make a form and force the trumpet bell to fit it. What kind of hammer did they use. I couldn't hear.
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wrote:

Typically sandbags and specialized hammers and drifts are used
This may help. Its not an uncommon problem..but it can be fairly expensive to fix "properly"
https://duckduckgo.com/?q=trumpet+repair+california
Simply change the state to whatever state/provence you live in.
"
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The kid can take it to school and get another one. Problem solved.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
On 8/19/2013 4:34 PM, Gunner Asch wrote:

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On Monday, August 19, 2013 5:05:05 PM UTC-4, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I don't know what affluent, well-funded school district you live in but most schools don't just give out musical instruments to students.
If your kid wants to play an instrument, you lease it for the school year through a company that's contracted by the school, or you go out and buy one from a music store or off craigslist.
Likely, this trumpet is OWNED by the kid's parents. There is no "give it back and they'll give you a new one."
This is a GREAT time to teach the kid a lesson about personal responsibility. Send the trumpet home with him and make him own up to damaging it. Helping him hide this from his parents is sending him the wrong message and teaching him bad behavior.
Luckily trumpets are cheap. They ought to be able to find a good used one at a music store or on craigslist, or get this one fixed.
I'm sure a good music store could get the trumpet fixed good as new for not much $$$.
Whatever it costs, make the kid work it off.
Whaever you do QUIT HELPING HIM HIDE IT, and the rest of you quit encouraging him to help this kid LIE to his parents.
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On Mon, 19 Aug 2013 09:44:08 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

Did the kid drop it from the 5th or 6th floor?
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That was the first question I had upon seeing it. I don't think he 'dropped' it. I think he got pissed, and THREW it down.
Maybe, given the cost to Momma for that horn, he should 'fess-up first, THEN seek to get it repaired. Any good musical instruments shop would have leads on brass horn repair people.
Lloyd
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On Mon, 19 Aug 2013 06:55:36 -0500, Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:

If it's a student model horn, that damage can come from it being dropped. They're made from soft brass, and the student models are made light for little arms to hold up. (Pro trumpets are heavy because a stiffer horn sounds better).
My kid did about half that much damage by knocking one off a chair, witnessed by SWMBO.
I wouldn't take it anywhere but a shop that specifically does that kind of repair. There are specialized bucks that are made specifically for fixing that damage, and people experienced at doing the work.
There'll be evidence of the repair -- the shop will make it sound good and look right from ten feet away, but close inspection will show creases. Confession is good or the soul (and the body, if you can't cover things up).
Wally's Music in Oregon City, Oregon, if you live close enough.
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Tim Wescott
Control system and signal processing consulting
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On 8/19/2013 7:36 AM, Gunner Asch wrote:

Truth be told, I think Grumpy Grampa became tired of listening to the kid attempt to play the trumpet, wrestled it out of the kids hands and threw it out the window.
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That can be fixed, but it very easy to make it worse, so I suggest a professional. Call a school that still has a band and ask who does theirs.
You won't get it back in time. Convince him to 'fess up. Don't rat him out though, nobody likes a stool pigeon.
Paul K. Dickman
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Danny,
I think this is beyond simple repair. He's going to have to face Mom. I hope this is not a school rental.
Dave M.
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