Need a new outlet

There is an electric outlet in my garage, about 4' above the floor, in an outside wall.
I would like to install an additional outlet on the outside of the same wall at the same height. This wall consists of wallboard on the inside, stucco on the outside, probably with a layer of plywood under the stucco.
Can I just knock a whole in the stucco/plywood, install a box and connect a new outlet in the new outside box to the wires in the inside box?
Is 4' from the ground too high (Code)? There is a firestop in the wall that makes it hard to shift the new outlet vertically.
Thanks
--
Walter
www.rationality.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Not an electrician..
To minimize damage to the exterior stucco I would drill a hole through the wall (from inside), adjacent the interior box (same side of stud) with a long bit. Pull the short wire and then mount an outside electric box on the stucco surface. No need to cut out the stucco, unless you want the box recessed.
Is the garage box on GFCI?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Walter R. wrote:

Sure. That's how the boxes in your house are connected (daisy-chained).

Don't know about "code" (we don't pay too much attention to that in Houston) but it would seem even better than lower down - less chance of water infiltration, weeds, lizards, etc.
Prudence indicates a GCFI outlet as well as a weatherproof box.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I like to have a few outlets around that height. They're a lot easier to get to. At standard outlet height, they're harder to reach and tend to get hidden behind things.
BTW, I know someone else who put an outdoor outlet up high. It's intended use was for holiday lights on the roof, so a low outlet would require a longer extension cord, which would get in the way more.

--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Who is Prudence, the building inspector?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

[snip]
How about replying to the person who said that?
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That should be fine. You should be able to determine by snaking into the wall from inside the existing outlet, just how far up or down you can go before hitting any cat beams. If the outlet in the garage was installed within the last 25 years or so, it should be GFCI protected already, if so, no additional GFCI protection will be required on the outside. The current NEC does require a "while in use" cover for outside outlets

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you have space within the wall cavity, and want to avoid a bulbous in-use cover that sticks out of the side of the building, I suggest a retrofit version of the Arlington InBox:
http://www.aifittings.com/whnew73.htm
Cheers, Wayne
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Maybe it is me and I am not reading this correctly.
I would cut a 4-6" wide path on the inside into the drywall until I got to where I wanted the box. If using a surface mount I would then drill a single wire sized hole. to allow the wire to enter the back of the box. If using the retro then you would need to cut a hole the size of the box.
I would go with a surface mount bell box as they are easier to seal around and keep the water out of your house.
The drywall is a lot easier to repair than any damage you do to your stucco or substrate. The path only needs to be wide enough for you to insert your drill to keep the wire in the center of the studs. Please don't do something stupid like notching the studs and putting the wire in that. It will bite you in the butt in the future.
Also make sure it is GFIC protected. Your garage should already be that if recent contraction.
--
Colbyt
Please come visit www.househomerepair.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.