Necessary to cover top of central AC intake in winter?

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wrote:

Don't use oil--Have a natural gas 90+% efficient, condensing furnace. It's a two stage with a variable speed fan. Gas bill is not that high even in the cold months. Keep the house at 69 F during the day and 65 F at night. MLD
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On Sun, 22 Jan 2012 14:38:13 -0600, The Daring Dufas

Yes, I was talking about if the outside compressor/condenser unit failed. That wouldn't give me any inclination to do anything with the furnace.
But if I was replacing my furnace, I think I would want a new A/C system then. Kind of like if I'm pulling a cam cover to do a timing belt on a car I'll put in a new water pump. Nearly all the labor is getting in there. I don't know how this works with HVAC, or how evap coils go with a particular furnace or condenser unit, is why I asked. I'm not even considering system efficiency, just component longevity, and the "sweet spot" to go ahead and replace them all at one time.
Since I had a new furnace and central A/C put in at the same time, I'm ignorant of the separate costs.
--Vic
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On 1/22/2012 3:09 PM, Vic Smith wrote:

I think you did OK. I'd never turn down money but I'll always tell a customer the truth, lies are too hard to keep up with. ^_^
TDD
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I suspect that the old R-22 will be around for a long time. I've worked with it for years, and seems to do the job.
Some companies are pushing the new Puron stuff. I'll have to get some training before too long. More gages and tanks of gas to haul around.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
If you have the money and can afford it, by all means upgrade. You'll save money in the long run with a higher efficiency unit. When you say replace compressor, I assume you mean the whole condensing unit which is the outdoor/hot part. New R22 systems are no longer being shipped but dry/without Freon replacement units designed for R22 are sold for repair purposes. I've installed a number of them where the indoor coil and furnace were in good shape and the customer didn't want to shell out thousands for a complete new system. There is still a lot of R22 along with many 100w light bulbs sitting in warehouses. ^_^
TDD
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A thorough professional cleaning can restore a lot of the lost efficiency. I know, I've done enough cleanings.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
You're right--it's probably very inefficient. When we get into a couple of heat waves as we did last summer my electric bill climbs well above normal. Lucky about one thing though that does reduces the pain--my city has it's own (municipal) power company and if you pay your bill before a specified date you get a 20% discount which can be quite substantial. However, being in the Northeast it really doesn't run all that much compared to a warmer climate, so I'll stick with it for as long as it lasts. MLD
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And imagine how much your customers would have saved if they had a "thorough professional cleaning" instead of whatever service you provided.
--
Often wrong, never in doubt.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar. org
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You're wrong, I don't doubt.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
And imagine how much your customers would have saved if they had a "thorough professional cleaning" instead of whatever service you provided.
--
Often wrong, never in doubt.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar. org
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Yes. Helps keep snow and debris out. Leave the sides open for air circulation. The outside unit doesn't run during the winter.
The outdoor unit isn't an air intake, it's the machine that dumps the heat energy (BTUs) from the house. Sounds like you should ask your HVAC repair guy what each device does, in general terms.
I did look for a good website, but didn't find any that made sense, and easy to understand and all that.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Hi , I have central air in my house and I live in the northeast. There is an outside unit that sits on a slab that I think brings in the air. Its a box and every side is metal screen. I was driving around my neighborhood yesterday and I saw that some people in my neighborhood had their AC units covered, just the top, with plastic. This would cut down on the air intake but maybe it is more important that ice and snow do not get inside? Are you supposed to cover the top of the intake in the winter? Thanks
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BTW, I'm working on a model that would bring the air in through the outdoor unit. My prototype brings the cold air in in the winter and the warm air in in the summer. I just have to reverse that and it will work really well.
I've googled "air temp reverser" but I can't find anything good, at least nothing that will fit in the condenser case.. Can you guys recoommend something?
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micky wrote the following:

Heat pump.
--
Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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wrote:

Mine is going to be simpler than that, cheaper to buy and cheaper to run. Just a fan with a temp reverser.
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Name Classified wrote:

Our Carrier unit came with cover when installed. Custom fit with Carrier Logo on it, etc. just like BBQ cover. I use it during winter.
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wrote:

That sounds right. I use my BBQ in t he summer to remove the hot air from the house.
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I used to cover mine in the winter until I got a heat pump. Covering it did keep out a lot of leaves. The leaves tend to cause the bottom of the unit to rust out.
Jimmie
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Name Classified wrote:

No. Just like you're not supposed to cover the roof turbines or block ridge vents.
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Why would you not cover a AC condenser unit in the winter?
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On 1/17/2012 3:24 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

because nothing is gained by doing so. And the resulting condensation or sweating under the cover could do damage to the electronics and electrical .
--
Steve Barker
remove the "not" from my address to email
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Traps humidity in, promotes rust. That's why you put something over it, but leave the sides open.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Why would you not cover a AC condenser unit in the winter?
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Oren wrote:

It DOES snow in Houston. About once every seven years. At least 1/4-1/2 inch! I'm not making this up - at least that much.
When snow is forecast, everybody goes home from work. The schools are closed. Church pews fill up. The Red Cross opens shelters and people stock up on beer and strawberry pop-tarts, then they huddle in the family room and profess their undying love for each other. Spontaneous prayer breaks out.
Officials scramble to close the freeways before 200-car pile-ups occur.
The kids scrape a wad of snow off car hoods, construct an 8" snowman and call it good.
Outside dogs get terribly confused. Outside cats don't give a shit.
Now you folks in Buffalo are giggling (I know you are), but it's really a question of what you're used to. Visitors to our area from Minnesota or Illinois, as soon as a hurricane enters the Gulf, they look down and say: "Feet! Make Tracks!"
We natives - or the acclimated - view a hurricane as God's invitation to party. It takes a few beers to laugh when a metal trash can, flying by at 70 mph, hits your car.
But snow? Heck, man, snow can kill you! Can't be too careful around snow. No, indeed.
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

* You've got to get it out of storage (or make or buy a new one). * You've got to install it. Just laying a bit of plywood on top won't work. You have to belay it with bungee cords and turnbuckles so it will withstand the wind. * If it was just a freak cold-front, and it's 82 degrees tomorrow, you've got to remove it. * If you forget to remove it, after the freak cold spell or in the spring, you're out several hundred dollars as the whole condensing unit bellies up and washes ashore.
Admittedly, I'm in a pretty temperate clime, but I've never heard of anyone covering a condensing unit, much less seen one in the wild. If there's something destructive in your area about your particular brand of snow or ice (salt?), then cover away. Maybe even rig up some sort of heater...
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