Nearly three feet

Page 4 of 4  
On Mon, 4 Nov 2013 00:24:00 -0500, Stan Brown

Just for S&G, I measured the one I purchased from Harbor Freight. It is labeled as a 36" grabber, and it is 36" in length, but the distance between my thumb and the tip is 32" when I hold it. It extends my grasp about 30" since the last 2" are the gripping part.
All I can assume about the OP's claim of 28" is that he must have extraordinarily long thumbs. He really doesn't need a grabber; he could pick up things from the ground without even stooping over.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando FL

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dan,
I think that you should not buy it.
Dave M.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
David L. Martel wrote:

Only one review and that is a 5 star. "I have purchase this again and again". That's says it all. Maybe he'll get one that works next time.
--
Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/3/2013 4:51 PM, Daniel Prince wrote:

I think you're the reason the Foot Long Hot Dog stands at the fair now have "About a" in parentheses before their name.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 05/11/13 07:49, Moe DeLoughan wrote:

Subway sells foot-long sandwiches that are about ten inches long.
--
Peter Moylan, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. http://www.pmoylan.org
For an e-mail address, see my web page.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
* Peter Moylan:

Metric feet?
I believe in this country the size is labelled "12 inch".
--
*Multitasking* /v./ Screwing up several things at once

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
(alt.home.repair dropped)
Peter Moylan:

Oliver Cromm:

I don't think so. In 2012 a Subway was one of the places I was going for lunch semi-regularly, and I remember the name "foot-long" because it contrasted with the simple "large" at Tim Hortons. Of course, it might have changed since then. I never measured them, but the Subway ones did look about a foot long to my eyes; the ones at Tim Hortons (since discontinued) were shorter but thicker.
I looked at http://www.subway.ca , but while they are most eager to show you nutritional and other details for the "standard 6-inch" size, I found no reference to the larger size at all. However, a Google search
allintext: 12-inch OR foot-long OR footlong site:subway.ca
turned up a number of results, the first page of which all had "footlong" or "foot-long" in the given excerpts.
--
Mark Brader |"It's bad enough that this... font doesn't distinguish
Toronto | between I and l, but I'd never had a problem with V before!"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mark Brader:

Well, apparently I mean I *meant* to drop it. Sorry. Followups directed to alt.usage.english this time, at least.
--
Mark Brader | "Warning! Drinking beer, wine or spirits during
Toronto | pregnancy can harm your baby." (City of Toronto
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2013-11-06, Oliver Cromm wrote:

A metric foot would be 30 cm, wouldn't it?
--
Unix is a user-friendly operating system. It's just very choosy about
its friends.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It is certainly what timber merchants use." transition" - possibly, but it's been with us for rather too long for that.
--
From KT24

Using a RISC OS computer running v5.18
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
charles wrote:

A ligneous equivalent of the grocer's thumb.
--
Les (BrE)


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
* charles:

The pound was first defined to be 500 g in Germany in the 1850s. A good hundred years later, it ceased to be an allowed measure in trade. It is now slowly vanishing from everyday language. So, maybe 100-200 years is realistic for this kind of transition.
--
The Eskimoes had fifty-two names for snow because it was important
to them, there ought to be as many for love.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 7 Nov 2013 13:47:53 -0500, Oliver Cromm

Big difference there; you had before unification a good many measures, roughly but not exactly equal, with the same name. Standardizing -them- was the first step.
ANMcC
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Or 290mm.
When South Africa went metric in 1971 the price of building rose, because metric bricks were smaller and took longer to lay. Then a brickmaker introduced the M290 brick, whose longest dimension was 290mm, which made it bigger than the old Imperial bricks.
--
Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
Web: http://www.khanya.org.za/stevesig.htm
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2013-11-08, Steve Hayes wrote:

The standard British brick now is 215 × 102.5 × 65 mm; if you use the standard 10 mm joints, the length is twice the width or 3× the height. (I think the joints were smaller with the Imperial size.)
--
Unix is a user-friendly operating system. It's just very choosy about
its friends.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 03/11/2013 22:51, Daniel Prince wrote:

I agree with the "deceptive". I can see their logic; they are using "feet" as an integer quantity. So "one foot" is nowhere near three feet, but "two feet" is nearly three.
I use a related deception by saying that my age is nearer to 60 than it is to 50. I could equally say that I'm nearer 50 than 40, but that deception is more obvious upon inspection (of my face).
--
Steve Swift
http://www.swiftys.org.uk/
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Daniel Prince filted:

How many feet does the grabber extend your reach?..."more than two" is enough for them to call it "nearly three"....r
--
Me? Sarcastic?
Yeah, right.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/5/2013 2:30 AM, R H Draney wrote:

Using the words "nearly three" *sounds* more positive than using another word like say "almost three".
--
Jenn

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
* Jenn:

When my son is still up at 10:15, my wife reminds him that it's 11 and he should be in bed. I understand that she uses hyperbole, but I am still wondering how she expected him to learn the clock this way.

But it is in fact only "almost nearly three feet" (it would be nearly three feet if it was just a little longer).
--
The Internet? Is that thing still around? - Homer Simpson

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Oliver Cromm wrote:

true! So, why do we still talk that way?
--
Jenn



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.