Naval jelly


I have hand tools (garden pruners, hedge shears, shovels, spading forks, saws, etc) that have become slightly rusted.
To remove the rust, I soaked the tools in warm, soapy water and used a scrub brush to clean the tools and then dried the tools. I then brushed on Loctite Naval Jelly Rust Dissolver, let it sit for 10-15 minutes then rinsed off the tools in clean water but, instead of restoring the tools to their original condition, all of the tools turned black.
Now, how do I remove the black coating?
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On Fri, 27 Nov 2009 14:14:47 -0800 (PST), gcotterl

I don't know.
I would do like I learned. Immediately after the cleaning off of the Naval Jelly - apply oil on the implement.
Carpenters relied on their old hand saws.
And NEVER used water. YMMV.
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- P.S. the " Locative Naval Jelly Rust Dissolver" will turn metal black. At least the *previous* types of "rust dissolver" I've used on engines exhaust manifolds (readied for paint)
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yum, it tastes very good. We had it at Thanksgiving.
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Did Mom bake an anchor instead of a turkey?
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gcotterl wrote:

Normally you wouldn't want to remove it because it is stable, inert and paint ready. The black is iron phosphate resulting from the phosphoric acid in the naval jelly reacting with the iron oxide. I am thinking the tools might need a soaking in a moderate strength bath of HCL to remove the iron phosphate.
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NO! Leave the coating on as a preservative. It prevents further rusting very well. At this point if you need pretty, give them a nice coat of Rustoleum.
Joe
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I can't help with "fixing" it, but...it's supposed to do that.
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Joe wrote:

Thats why I described why the result occurred and the value of it. If the OP wants "original" they will loose that.
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: Thats why I described why the result occurred and the value of it. If : the OP wants "original" they will loose that.
How loose will it get? Can it be tightened again?
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On Fri, 27 Nov 2009 14:14:47 -0800 (PST), gcotterl

Sounds like a lot of work. I just use a wire wheel on a bench grinder. It doesn't give a protective coating but it does make things look nice, usually as nice as new. I don't normally have rust problems, only if I get things wet, so I don't think I need a protective coating.

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Doesn't anyone use a bucket of sand anymore? A couple quarts of fuel oil/diesel/kerosene in the bottom- an occasional stir- and no more rusty tools. [keeps the clay from sticking to shovels and trowels, and cleans off pine pitch on the pruners, too.]
I just store the shovels in the bucket. Hardest part was finding a heavy duty galvanized 20 quart pail. I suppose the plastic 5 gal buckets would work- until you tossed the shovel in at the end of the day & it punctured the bottom.

When I've got something rusting- I use Loctite's 'Extend' and embrace the blackness.
Jim
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wrote:

I keep a bucket of oily sand in the garden shed. When I am done with gardening, I plunge the spades, shears, etc into the oily sand and leave them there until I need them again. The sand cleans the tools and the oil prevents rust.
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On Fri, 27 Nov 2009 14:14:47 -0800 (PST), gcotterl

    You seem to have far too much time on your hand, how about stopping by and I can give you a few projects to keep you busy.
    The best idea I have seen to keep such tools rust free is a bucket of sharp sand with some old motor oil mixed in. After every use you just jam the shovel or whatever in there a few times and it will stay rust free and coated with a light coat of oil.
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On Fri, 27 Nov 2009 14:14:47 -0800 (PST), gcotterl

Gosh, I'd never soak tools in water! An old washcloth dampened with kerosene is all that you need.
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Phisherman wrote:

Nothing wrong with soap and water, as long as (1) there are no non-dryable crevices (like the pivot on loppers if you can't simply remove a bolt), and (2) you immediately wipe them down with something to keep rust from starting. I always blast yard tools with a hose to get the mud off, and set them in the sun to dry before I put them away. I also bought a toilet bowl brush to keep in the garage for use on tools and garbage cans, to scrub stubborn spots that have dried on.
For rust (like if shed roof leaks over the winter, or I buy something at a garage sale), I brush off the loose rust with a soft wire brush, and wipe down with an oily rag. Unlike fine woodworking tools, garden tools are consumables. You should take care of them, of course, but they do get used up. I find the contractor-grade tools last longer than the garden center variety.
-- aem sends...
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wrote:

In this case the OP used a " Rust Dissolver"> I've used them and they turn the metal black. The OP will not get it off at all. Rust Dissolver is used in automotive restoration. Years ago Navel Jelly was a small bottle of blue gel, IIRC. Wiped it on and wiped it off.
Loctite bought it and maybe the brand of rust dissolver, I've used in the past (name escapes me).
My GF used kerosene or maybe turpentine to wipe his hand saws with. It cleaned the pine resin nicely.
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