Natural Gas Shut Off

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You sure will look distinguished.
When I took some fire science courses years ago, the prof told us that a lit cig won't light gasoline, the end of the cig coats in ash, he said. One guy got complacent about stuffing out his smokes in gasoline, and flicked one. The ash knocked off, and the increased air flow made the glow hotter. That was enough to light the gas that time.
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"Oren" < snipped-for-privacy@home.yes.us> wrote in message
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Exactly what happens. I've done it dozens of times.
s

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HeyBub wrote:

depends on the circumstances
make a shallow pool of gasoline, wait a few minutes, and toss in a cig

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and he was right. even an acetylene cutting torch won't ignite off a cigarette without a punch of the oxygen lever.
s

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re: just like working with live electric lines, that safe too if done properly
Except that when working with live electric lines the results would not be as dramatic if something goes horribly wrong.
Let's take a worse case scenario - a solitary worker becomes disabled in the middle of the job - say from a heart attack. With live electric lines, there would be little to no damage, other than perhaps an injured/killed worker or a tripped breaker. However, if that same worker becomes disabled after opening a gas pipe, things could go boom if the conditions are right.
I know it's long shot situation, but to call it "just like" working on live electric lines might be a stretch.
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Was this safe? No. Is it common? I wouldn't be surprised.
When I had my furnace installed, we discovered that the main shut off inside the house turned off the gas to all the appliances except the furnace. The pipe to the furnace was T'd before the main internal shutoff. In order to shut off the gas to the furnace, we would have had to shut off the valve at the meter outside the house, which would have required a service call to the gas company to turn it back on. We opened all the doors in the basement and the installer removed one section of pipe at a time, installing a nipple with a cap as he got the next section ready. Eventually he rerouted the pipe to where it had to go, with each section only being open for a matter of seconds. With the air movement from the doors open we barely smelled any gas during the process.
I will note that the installer determined which pair of pliers he would use to turn off the gas at the meter and kept them handy throughout the rerouting in case he had to turn the gas off.
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Why would the gas co. have to turn it back on if you all turned it off? The valve turns just as easy both ways.
s

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The installer looked at the meter and said it was the style that was required to be "reset" with a special tool before the gas would come back on. Yes, the valve would turn both ways, but that something else had to be done to actually get the gas to flow. I guess it's a safety thing - if the gas had to be shut off, then either something was wrong or you made a change and they want to inspect stuff before the gas can be turned back on. No one would just turn the gas off for no reason.
On the other hand, the installer could have been wrong...I'll call my gas provider when I get a chance just so I'll know.
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To reset the meter you turn on the gas, open the cap for the diaphragm, and there is a little shaft in there, you just give it a tug and you will hear the gas start flowing, then put the cap back on. No need to call the gas company.

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I'd wondered that also. I've shut off gas before the meter, just have to turn it on very very slowly until you hear the gas start to flow. And then leave it for several seconds, so the system pressurizes slowly.
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"S. Barker" < snipped-for-privacy@coldmail.com> wrote in message
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Hmmmm. I've turned mine off and back on a dozen or so times. Never paid no mind as to how fast i opened the valve.
s

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I had a similar experience - when we put in a gas stove in the kitchen, the installer had to run piping for it. Working backwards from where the stove was, he installed piping (including a shutoff) up to the point where he was going to tap in to the existing gas pipe. He then quickly unscrewed a connection and installed a T to serve the new pipe. As I recall, part of the time he just put his thumb over the open pipe end to minimize leakage. Nothing bad happened. -- H
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Why? I've never heard that.
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"DerbyDad03" < snipped-for-privacy@eznet.net> wrote in message
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wrote:

I answered that question about 2 hours ago.
Here's what I said:
Quote ...
The installer looked at the meter and said it was the style that was required to be "reset" with a special tool before the gas would come back on. Yes, the valve would turn both ways, but that something else had to be done to actually get the gas to flow. I guess it's a safety thing - if the gas had to be shut off, then either something was wrong or you made a change and they want to inspect stuff before the gas can be turned back on. No one would just turn the gas off for no reason.
On the other hand, the installer could have been wrong...I'll call my gas provider when I get a chance just so I'll know.
... Unquote
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Some pressure regulators will lock out. As for why anyone would shut the gas off, it may be to remove and bypass the meter. People go to great lengths to steal utilities.
Last week we hat the gas off at work while they hooked up an additional gas line. A service guy had to check each appliance in the building to be sure it fired up OK. Of the 10 units, two have pilot lights (others are electronics) and he used a stick match on the end of a 6" rod with a clip to hold the match. For safety reasons, they are not allowed to use the butane lighters. He said they are too explosive and pack the power of 1/4 stick of dynamite.
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Someone has a goofy sense of things. Someone want to tell me how a butane lighter can explode while lighting a pilot light?
I use an Aim N Flame, one of the long lighters with the flame at the end. Or, I use a Mapp or propane torch to warm the thermocouple and light the pilot. I've been known to warm the thermocouple with a Mapp torch, turn the gas valve open, and the torch lights the burner ring under the water tank. Yeah, that's probably not a good idea.
I don't much like the smell of sulfur with using matches.
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"Edwin Pawlowski" < snipped-for-privacy@snet.net> wrote in message
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I probably goes with the "don't use your cell phone when pumping gas" stories. I did a quick Google search and found nothing of interest on explosions
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A few years ago I helped my wife put together a mock safety program for a class she was taking. On the CD we included a video of a lady who answered her cell phone while pumping gas and the "air" around her burst into flames. I'll see if I can find it or the link and get it posted someplace.
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The guys I've worked with call that "changing a valve on the fly". The way I saw it was to dope the threads as you unscrew the cap, so that the pipe is open for the briefest time possible.
Safe? Well, if it's done skillfully and quickly, it's not too bad.
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Christopher A. Young;
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"Edge" < snipped-for-privacy@peoplepc.com> wrote in message
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Was it safe? I guess it was if your house is still there. As a licensed plumber I have done that many times but I would not have done it if the homeowner was there. The gas has a very potent smell that is much stronger then the gas itself. It's done that way to get the consumers to pay attention to a small leak. Ever fixture needs its own shut-off. The main gas shut-off is located outside the house where the gas main enters the house. It is illegal to for a gas pipe to enter any building below ground. Your gas meter also has a (2) gas shut-offs. One is for a lock when you don't pay your bills. Listen or call in to the Jack Hammer Re-construction show on Tuesday Morning 9:am to 10:am 888-321-7234 and www.castlerrockradio.com Tomorrows show is about water treatment.
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