Natual gas vs propane, which is hotter

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Theres a discussion on alt.home repair, about convertiung natural gas grills to propane. My experience is the propane contains more BTUs and seers steaks better.
A good friend works at sears and reports they hate selling natural gas grills, since so many get returned with not hot enough complaints.
So I would appreciate the experts here at the barbecue group to give us their opinions.
my opinion is that even with different orfices propane will be hotter thn natural gas.....
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Theres a discussion on alt.home repair, about convertiung natural gas grills to propane. My experience is the propane contains more BTUs and seers steaks better.
A good friend works at sears and reports they hate selling natural gas grills, since so many get returned with not hot enough complaints.
So I would appreciate the experts here at the barbecue group to give us their opinions.
my opinion is that even with different orfices propane will be hotter thn natural gas.....
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

As long as it is a quality grill with properly sized orifices and supply there will be no difference.
The Sears problem could be that they are crappy designs and/or proper attention isn't being paid to the fuel supply requirements.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I would suggest that the difference in fuel is about 3% of the equation and the difference of design is 97%. You don't use the same orifice for both fuels so the results should be very similar.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia \'s Muire duit
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Joseph Meehan wrote:

Agreed. If proper orifice is used for either gas, they "should" put out roughly the same heat. BTUs
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The benefits of natural gas are summarized here: http://bbq.about.com/od/gasgrills/a/aa030505a.htm
But my personal experience is that all things being equal, nothing beats wood and real wood charcoal. But, there are times when I opt for using my gas grill.
For years I had a propane grill. In 2000 I switched to a Sunbeam natural gas grill. I love the convenience of never worrying about how much gas I have left. I have not had a problem with a lack of heat. In fact, I have never really had to use the high setting.
Hope that helps:) Chris
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I agree, I won't, and will never use a gas grill. Might just as well put the shit in the oven inside.
--
Steve Barker




"swibirun" < snipped-for-privacy@bellsouth.net> wrote in message
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

When converting most common fueled appliances, such as Cooktops, ovens, & gas fireplaces, switching them to over to LP from natural gas actually lowers the BTU's.
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Why would that be? LP gas has approximately twice the BTU content by volume as natural gas. Even if if the orifice was reduced by half, the heat content would be the same, not less.
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Rick Blaine wrote:

For example, re-jet a Viking gas cooktop for LP, and each burner's BTU rating drops by 500, as per spec sheet here:

on page 2.
I don't have the spec handy, but my gas fireplace rating is lower with LP than NG as well.
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How strange. Maybe the pressure is lower with LP gas?
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--




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news: snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com...
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After the regulator? I mean, what am I missing here?
It's a fact that LP is almost double the BTU content of NG per cubic foot. Reducing the orifice size for an LP fueled burner would bring the burner down to the same heat output. Why would a manufacturer bring it even lower?
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I don't have a clue, but most gas ranges for propane are rated lower than NG by about 1000 Btu per burner. There may be other factors at work, such as getting the proper gas - air mix in the burner or restrictions of the venturi. In the case of grills, the primary fuel source is propane while in ranges, the primary source is NG and in both cases thee is a conversion kit that uses much of the same mechanical components.
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Several years ago, we moved from a home with LP gas to one with natural gas. It turned out that it cost only about $25 to replace the orifices on our grill, so, rather than buy a new grill, we converted the old one from LP to natural.
Same burner. New orifices.
It burns a HELL of a lot hotter on NG than it ever did on LP.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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wrote:

gas.
to
This has nothing to do with which is hotter but rather a potential safety issue. In 2000 we had the flexible connection line fail on our propane GG and turned the tank into a huge blow torch that proceeded to burn off the back of the house because there was no way to extinguish the propane tank till it burned itself empty. That wouldn't of happened had I had a gas shut off as I do now with our natural gas grill. That's why I'll never own a propane grill again.
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wrote:

Wow.
That wasn't an issue for us. Since the house was heated with LP, I just installed a line out on to the deck, and ran the grill off the house supply. I had a shutoff right where the line exited the house (15' away from the grill), another shutoff inside the house, and of course a main shutoff at the tank.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Did you consider turning off the tank valve whilst this alleged broken line burnt your house?
--
Steve Barker




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I can't imagine getting near it if it was shooting out full blast. I think the new tanks with the OPD would shut off themselves in that condition.
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wrote:

Me neither. A garden hose couldn't have put out the flame, probably, but it might have kept the house from burning. But maybe he did do that and if not, it's easy to think of those things now.

Really?
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