nails or screws for plywood?


I'm going to try to install t1-11 panels on my porch ceiling. They'll be attaching directly to the trusses. Shank nails or screws, or does it matter?
Thanks.
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Labor vs. Cost might be something to consider.
Will be you be using a power nailer or swinging a hammer over head?
I'd opt for screws if the other option was swinging a hammer. To be honest, I opt for screws all the time.
The shed kit I just built came with nails, but I bought DeckMates and used them almost exclusively. In my mind, the ease of installation (and removal) offsets the additional expense.
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Screws will pull the plywood into tight contact with the trusses. Buy or rent an impact driver, get some Torx (star drive) screws and you will never again want to swing a hammer. Be aware that the impact driver will set the screws well below the plywood surface if you let it, so plan on practicing a bit of finesse with the new tool. Top of the line with the pros currently are the Makita impact drivers. The larger model is best for timbers and decks, the smaller one still more than enough for framing and sheathing. For economy, ring shank nails are often used to fill in between screws in subfloors and sheathing. Senco has some good RS nails that are quite tenacious. HTH
Joe
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wrote:

Screws will pull the plywood into tight contact with the trusses. Buy or rent an impact driver, get some Torx (star drive) screws and you will never again want to swing a hammer. Be aware that the impact driver will set the screws well below the plywood surface if you let it, so plan on practicing a bit of finesse with the new tool.
============================================= Might be an advantage of traditional philips head, as the bit will let go more easily. Proly wind up going through more bits, but they are cheap enough, and you can't get cheaper than sheet rock screws, afaik.
And, sheet rock screw guns have torque limiters, but I don't know how repeatable this would be in wood.
--
EA







Top of
the line with the pros currently are the Makita impact drivers. The
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wrote:

re: "can't get cheaper than sheet rock screws"
A porch ceiling probably means an exterior application.
Sheet rock screws are probably not a good idea.
Deckmate or equivalent are suggested for exterior use.
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-snip-

I think you mis-spelt 'definitely as 'probably'. not just because they will rust in no time- but they are also a lot more brittle & I wouldn't trust them not to shear frequently.

Or, IMO for any time you care about shear strength. not important for sheetrock, as sheetrock 'gives'. Plywood doesn't.
Jim
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On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 08:09:01 -0800, k wrote:

I use screws on anything I either* want to last or might need to dismantle at a later date (it might be a stretch to say you might want to remove a ceiling, but I suppose easy access might be useful if you might ever want to do any wiring up there, or add more insulation).
* or where the vibration of pounding nails in might cause problems.
cheers
Jules
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On Nov 12, 12:22pm, Jules

re: "or where the vibration of pounding nails in might cause problems"
or the noise...
I'll screw a deck at 8 AM on a Sunday morning or 10 o'clock at night, but I might start a few hours later or quit a few hours earlier if I had to pound nails.
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That's the only downside to the impact driver, as far as I can see. Decibel-wise I think it is equal to a hammer-- but it is more annoying.
Jim
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k wrote:

Screws hold the best.
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Screws would be easier to install, and easier for servicing later. Use an electric drill, with screwdriver tip. Sounds like you also need two helpers.
--
Christopher A. Young
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