nailer/stapler

Anyone have any opinions about a nailer/stapler in the $50 (+? )range? I'm about to reupholster a set of dining room chairs but also intend to use it for light work in building furniture so I'm lookong for some versatility. Bob
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

I agree. I bought a compressor about 2 years ago and wonder why I didn't buy one a long time ago, lots of use and lots of fun.
Don't know anything about upholstery, so what do you use a nailer for? I have an air stapler from Harbor Freight (about $22) that takes staples up to 1 inch and an 18 gauge air brad nailer that takes nails up to 1-3/16 inches (about $14). Both work fine. Any size compressor that will deliver 80 psi would be fine. $200 buy a fair sized compressor, nailers and staplers don't use much air and need only a small compressor in the $80 range.
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Do these compressors use gas or electricity?

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Electric. Gas ones do exist though. Ed
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Thanks. Could I use a compressor such as this for a paint spray gun? I am trying to see if I can justify the cost. I told my wife we can use it for blowing up kid's toys, so I am working that angle with her.

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Small gun, yes. You have to check out the cubic feet per minute (cfm) and match the gun to it. All are capable of enough pressure, but the small compressors will not keep up with the demands of certain power tools like air sanders and grinders often used for heaving work. A wrench is used intermittently so it is not a factor. Ed
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I've used both my big compressor & my small tankless one with my brad shooters & staplers successfully. They're electric (110).
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I've have an electric stapler & a couple of air staplers. It depends on how thick the upholstry is, how hard the wood is that you're stapling to, and how much you'll be doing. Sometimes the electric is adequate, hammering in the occasional staple that sticks out. If it were me and money was really tight for a small job, I'd buy a box of staples, then borrow or buy an electric stapler, try it out & return it if it doesn't do the job. Then you'd buy or rent a air stapler and, if you don't have one, a compressor. But I'll agree with a couple of the other posters - my preference would be an air stapler. They're really handy and much more likely to do a good job. Just be aware that there are narrow crown and wide crown (1/2") air staplers. The wide is normally used for upholstry; the narrow crown may tend to "cut" the fabric/vinyl. I have a wide-crown Senco that I think cost about $80-$100 new a year ago. Actually used that one to staple rolled roofing down using roofing tins. Did a good job. My electric is a Stanley that I've had for years and years - been pretty happy with that. My Sears narrow crown stapler is actually a stapler/brad combo. It's been a life-saver in cabinetry & for repairs. HTH
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