Nail Pop Repair Question

My home is a few years old and I'm starting to see some ceiling nail pops....a couple in each room. Since I'm new to this repair I practiced on a couple in my garage. I figure if I'm gonna screw up, the garage is a good place.
I'm pretty pleased with the results. I took a drywall screw and screwed it in about an inch below the nail (which I pulled out). Spackled, repainted and the repair looks good...paint matches perfectly but the texture doesn't match. I've got a knock down texture on all my interior walls and of course the repair is smooth. I played around with a knock down texture spray but wasn't happy with it.....it comes out a liquidy gooey mess. Did I buy a bad can?
Anyway, I'm wondering if an acceptable repair would be to pull the nail pop out and screw in a drywall screw in it's place. The diameter of the screws is slightly larger than the nail so I'm thinking this may be good enough to grab onto the wood underneath. And, of course, the repair size would be small....just a bit bigger than the diameter of the screw head....a flat texture from the spackle wouldn't be very noticeable. If I use this method, is this screw gonna pop out with time? Any opinions?
Dan P. ---------------
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If its a new house do you have a warranty. Actualy nails should not have been used, screws are the norm. You may have a legal issue of the builder not using specfied or code fasteners. The problem will continue.
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On Sun, 2 May 2004 18:48:53 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (m Ransley) wrote:

The homes are warrantied for one year....I spoke to them and they aren't interested in doing anything. They also told me the norm is to use nails and not screws, except in the very expensive homes.
BTW, this is a Dr. Horton home and I live in one of their communities. One of my neighbors has the exact same problem. I'm thinking this sort of problem is common from what I've researched but I am by no means a home construction expert. ---------------
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Actually nailpops are from piercing the paper with the head and I supposed it can happen with screws too if they screw too deep. Some guys use a few screws and adhesive on the studs which was done in my house but my feeling is that that has its own problems because the sheetrock is held rigidly against studs which move and one sheet moves with respect to another and then you have a seam open which is worse than a nail pop. In reality someone should do a study of what works best but the construction industry is such a mess I am sure it will never happen and even if it does, the info will never get to the people who do the work (assuming they care).
Bottomline is that the paper around the nail is loose and needs to be fastened down with another nail or drywall screw and then then hole filled and painted.
(m Ransley)

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Actually, not so- the part about piercing the paper. Mostly from nails driven into wood that subsequently dries more, and shrinks. Nail is than partially "spit out" from that shrinking, at least releasing grip on sheetrock, sometimes pushing out against surface. _Extremely_ unlikely with screws. In my experience.
John

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This may not work as when you use a nail you put a large dimple in the drywall material with a hammer. This dimple is not proper for a screw. However, I would still replace the nail with a screw because the nail is loose and will never tighten up. If you are careful and you choose yoru spot carefully you can place the extra screw in a large raised spot which might be easier to cover.
-- Mike D.
www.stopassaultnow.org
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Why is this so complicated? I just simply remove the nail, fil the hole with spackle or joint compound, drive a screw about 1 inch from the original nail pop.

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Pull the nail, us a drywall screw longer than the original nail. Put some glue on the screw before driving it in as well. I use elmers or carpenters glue.
Dan P. wrote:

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