Nail gun advice.

I'm thinking of buying a nailer. My wife would like molding where there is none, and new molding where there is old. That adds up to a fair amount of molding. After that I see only sporadic use. I'm a homeowner with modest but useful skills, but I have no experience at all with nailers.
Questions:
First, and most important, my house has plaster walls. The interior walls are what I believe is called "plasterboard", which appears to be essentially sheetrock with 1" holes in it. Plaster is applied over that , sticking through the holes for extra strength. The exterior walls are masonry (brick or cinder block) with plaster applied onto the inside surfaces.
So can I expect to nail into those surfaces? I suppose if I have to I can choose a molding shape that I can nail into the ceilings rather than the walls.
What about nail gauges? What is appropriate for my use? And lengths?
For the relatively light use that I have described would a fuel cell powered gun be a good choice? I like the idea of avoiding a tether, but I wonder if there aren't some limitations that might even affect me.
What else am I forgetting?
Greg Guarino
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A finish nail gun would do well. They are usually 15 or 16 gauge. You can buy a kit with compressor at Home Depot etc. that has everything you need. Both Bostitcha nd Porter Cable have them. The Harbor Freight guns are supposed to be pretty good and are less than $30.

You want to catch the studs. Naild don't hodl ell in plaster or drywall.

2" should do for most everything.

Yes, from what I've seen but I've n ot u sed one. They look heavier and bulkier though.

Miter saw!
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wrote:

them.
Greg Guarino
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rent the setup you need from Home Depot.
I have a Porter Cable BN200 (18 gage 2"max) Brad nailer and a Accuset (16 gage 2 1/2"max) Brad nailer.
Both get only occasional use; PC was a gift & I bought the Accuset used for $60.
Base molding; shot into sill & studs (use stud finder if you must) you'll be able to tell the "misses"
Crown; shoot into studs & joists
18 gage makes much small "holes" in molding. 16 gage holds better but the holes are bigger. 15 gage probably more than needed.
prime & prepaint molding; install fill with no-shrink spackle, touch up; done
YMMV
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I ordered a harbor freight one about 5 years ago and sent it back. While it worked OK, and was really cheap, there was no safety on it at all. Just touch the trigger and you shot a brad. (I know, I know....hit what you aim at and all that, but still...)
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Are you sure you didn't simply have the safety disabled?
Have a nice one...
Trent
Budweiser: Helping ugly people have sex since 1876!
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Oh yes. There was nothing.
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I use my PC 18 gauge brad nailer all the time, and the small nail holes give a better finished product than manual finishing nails. It is great for casings, baseboards, window frame, etc.
Dave

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Greg,
Air nailers have no feel so you cannot tell if you have encountered an obstruction or missed a stud.
If you have a two story house be careful near studs that have outlets or switches. Wiring can travel the edge of the stud. The same applies to water pipes and hot water heating if they travel to an upper floor.
Don't put your hand near the nailer head when applying a shot. The wire nails can turn 180 degrees (go U shape) if they encounter an obstruction (nail head, knot, or steel bracket).
Mike

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<< I'm thinking of buying a nailer. My wife would like molding where there is none, and new molding where there is old. That adds up to a fair amount of molding. After that I see only sporadic use. >>
So go with construction adhesive. Use an occasional finihing nail where necessary until it sets up, or tape in place. The current new adhesives are a remarkable lot and your total investment is less than five bucks. HTH
Joe
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But does it come off?
I just removed a lot of baseboard (new flooring going down) and was able to re-finish and replace it exactly. If adhesive pulled things apart I may have had a lot more work. I may never take the baseboard off again, but you just never know.
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wrote:

Sure. Its just a matter of how difficult is it gonna be.

I think its rare to take off baseboard and not damage either the wall or the board. Most times, the boards are so brittle over the years that they easily snap.
I always brad nail my trim...but gluing may indeed be a good idea...especially when compared to the initial cost of nailing equipment.
For the OP...
Just use a hammer and some colored finishing nails.
Have a nice one...
Trent
Budweiser: Helping ugly people have sex since 1876!
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