Mythbusters Blows Up Water Heater

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I don't think so because water will not compress. Hence the term "water hammer". There would have to be another way for the pressure to release.
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Actually, the pressure in the tank would indeed push back into the cold water supply. If there are any accumulators, they would buffer the pressure change. Otherwise, sooner or later (probably sooner) some over pressure valve somewhere will give, whether it is the one on your tank or your neighbors tank or some valve attached to the water supply. Your water lines in your house are not closed - they are open to the city supply, and all of your neighbors houses. Unless, like I said, there is a check valve somewhere. Unless you have, for example, a well. Then the pressure would push water into your accumulator (water tank). Since it is probably a small tank, your water pressure would rise until a check valve opens or something breaks.
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For all intents and purposes, fluids don't compress. In reality, they will compress. It takes an unreal amount of pressure resulting in very little compression.
Just a useless tidbit.
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wrote:

because air IS a fluid, and compressed just fine, thank you!!
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote in

OK, be that way Ms. Fluid Dynamics :-)
Come to think of it, Dr. Marcus did say that back in the 70's I recall now. Silly me.
Gee, I have a Porter Cable fluid compressor.
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wrote:

Clare as in CLARENCE
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But compared to gases they don't compress.
Not enough to make any difference in the experiment in the video. Unless there was somewhere to "push" the water. The hole would be essentially plugged. The plug could blow.
Hey...it's "about" the only thing I remember from my water management class back in the early 70s.
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Let me put on my reading glasses....Ah!
I "now" realize that was basically what you said.
Just a useless tidbit
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wrote:

In Zambia our water supply filled what was basically a "stock tank" in the attic and everything was gravity fed from there, so the "geyser" couls cause reversion flow without any trouble. In the hot season (3/4 of the year) we just turned the geyser off and got very warm water direct fron the tap. Needed to refrigerate water for drinking, unless you were drinking tea.
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Red Green wrote:

Does this mean TSA will be searching us all for water heaters before we board the plane?
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Makes me glad I replaced that safety valve. It was very corroded when I accidentally noticed it.
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Seems strange that hot water heaters aren't designed to rupture in some less destructive manner. To have the bottom blow out so that the thing flies into the air like a rocket seems like a terrible design.
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Davej wrote:

That's why we use thermostats and T&P valves. Not to mention, if the pressure in a home water system ever came anywhere near 300+ psi, something elsewould let go first. Like those plastic toilet valves, or the washer hoses.
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