Mystery pipe?

Page 1 of 4  
Awl --
Ahm semi-re-plumbing the lines to the HW heater, and I noticed what appears to be some sort of vent/pressure relief ditty coming off the *CW inlet to the HWH*. From the CW pipe to this gadget is copper, from the gadget to the wall is 1/2 black pipe. The 1/2 pipe goes thru an outside wall, altho I have yet to find anything outside!
I'd be hardpressed to imagine that this thing still works, whatever it was. I'm sure it's 25++ years old. It's not an anti-water hammering device, afaict. Is it safe to just get rid of this thing? City water pressure is barely 60 psi, I have gauges plumbed into a couple of lines, very little variation. It would make my life a lot easier if I could ignore/get rid of this thing.
--
EA



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

http://www.oconomowocplumbing.com/design/wisconsin-plumbing-code-water-heater-relief-valve /
City water can be shut off, making the tank a closed system. Then simply heating cold water can generate enough pressure to pop the relief valve. I found that out by experience after closing the meter valve to make a repair. jsw
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 22/01/2013 10:00 PM, Jim Wilkins wrote:

http://www.oconomowocplumbing.com/design/wisconsin-plumbing-code-water-heater-relief-valve /
The relief valve on our HWS cracks every sunny day (solar system), old gas system used to as well.
Check out the Mythbusters video on what a HWS explosion can do - quite impressive & destructive even if it is enhanced by the Jamie's.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yes, that tank and water explosion was a sight to behold. IIRC they removed the TP valve, and deliberately blew it up. Took much longer than they expected.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Check out the Mythbusters video on what a HWS explosion can do - quite impressive & destructive even if it is enhanced by the Jamie's.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 22 Jan 2013 10:16:56 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

A friend's boyhood home had a water heater explosion early one Sunday morning. It lifted all the floor boards from the joists, most of the joists from the foundation, and the floorboards from the upstairs floor as well as blowing out all the windows and lifting the roof. Apparently it took several weeks to get the old farm-house livable after. Neighbours a few farms away felt the shock as well as hearing the boom.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Some new fangled safety devices are a good thing?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
A friend's boyhood home had a water heater explosion early one Sunday morning. It lifted all the floor boards from the joists, most of the joists from the foundation, and the floorboards from the upstairs floor as well as blowing out all the windows and lifting the roof. Apparently it took several weeks to get the old farm-house livable after. Neighbours a few farms away felt the shock as well as hearing the boom.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

new hot water tanks come with a temp pressure valve pre installed, the outlet should go to the floor to prevent a scald hazard if someone happens to be walking by when it operates
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, 22 January 2013 09:43:02 UTC-5, bob haller wrote:

Some jurisdictions require the pressure relief to be piped outdoors. Sounds like this is what the OP is looking at.
Chip C Toronto
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/22/2013 9:14 AM, Chip C wrote:

Nope...PRV is on the side of the tank not on the CW supply line...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/22/2013 10:19 AM, dpb wrote:

A pressure relief valve can be anywhere as long as it can "see" tank pressure and never be isolated. We have an indirect heater and the valve sits right on top.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

If it is pressure only, yes. If temp and pressure, it needs to be in the top (portion) of the rank
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

All the hot water tanks I've ever seen over decades had a combined temperature and pressue relief valve installed on the side of the tank itself. EA doesn't say if it has that in addition to the mystery thing or not.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/22/2013 6:08 PM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Our temperature and pressure valve sits on top and it is a contemporary model boilermate. But since you haven't seen one it probably doesn't exist.
http://www.amtrol.com/boilermate.htm
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sounds reasonable, esp. before relief valves were integrated into the heater itself. Funny, I have TWO of these 1/2" lines going thru the outside wall, the other proly went to the old old berler. Gas furnace, now. If it weren't so cold, I'd dig down a bit on the outside of the wall, see if dirt accumulated over the outlet. Just curious..... And might come in handy, as I can proly snake wires thru these pipes, to get power to the outside. :)
--
EA


>
> Chip C
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

new hot water tanks come with a temp pressure valve pre installed, the outlet should go to the floor to prevent a scald hazard if someone happens to be walking by when it operates ================================================== OK, since my HWH is a Kenmore, it of course has this valve built in to the heater itself.
Is what Jim was talking about how they did it in the old days? If so, then I can just remove that piping?
Now I know what those long tubes are for! I guess I should put one on.... :)
--
EA



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The old days? I replaced my water heater a year ago. jsw
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What did you pay? I think I'm on borrowed time... :(
So you have a relief thingy on the LINE, and not on the heater itself?
--
EA


> jsw
>
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

$237, plus $33.98 for the flex hose connector kit, in December 2011 at Lowes. The relief valve is on the side of the tank near the top. The tank that leaked was installed in 1987. The thermostat is at 120F which may extend the life of the elements and the tank. When I need hotter water to scrub pots I heat a teakettle.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

Just in case there is some confusion, this apparent pressure relief thingy is on the cw LINE, not on the tank. My tank has a built-in one, as well, as I'm pretty sure was mandated by law at least 20 years ago.
So I'm going to scrap the one on the line.

That's a great price -- 40-50 gal, I presume. I got my 50 gal kenmore a bunch of years ago on sale for $160, now I see them for close to and over $1000!!! At both Sears, HD.... wtf???? I'll check out Lowes. I really should start preparing for when mine goes.... it's way overdue....
--
EA


>



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

new tanks are more efficent and safer too.....
although electric tanks are 100% efficent less standby losses newer foam insulation cuts operating expenses dramatically
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.