Mysterious Water on Carpet

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I came home from a week-long vacation to find the carpet in the doorway to my bedroom wet. It didn't appear wet at first, but when you step on it, water would seem to seep up from the carpet pad. I discovered by stomping around a bit that the water seems to continue a few feet down the wall. I have no idea where it came from. There is a bathroom on the other side of the wall, but I see no signs of any leakage in there. Could a leaking pipe in the wall cause the carpet in the bedroom to be wet, but show no signs in the bathroom?
And where do I go from here? I have no idea if the problem is still happening or if it was a one time thing. I guess need to get a wet vac and dry the carpet as best as I can and then see if it gets wet again.
Does anyone have any other suggestions? If this is a sign of a larger problem, I know I need to get it taken care of as soon as possible.
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AC condensate drain pan clogged? Pierced water line or waste line by a drywall screw that finally rusted away? Leaking bowl gasket? Need more info. I would suggest opening the wall since you want everything to dry out, thus preventing mold. I would also suggest spraying a 10% bleach and water solution on the affected area, to cut down on mold growth. Mold is LETHAL if it gets growing.
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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The doorway with the wet carpet is nowhere near the AC drain pan. And the drywall and basebard etc. next to the affected carpet is in perfect condition. They show no signs of water damage. And again, the bathroom on the other side of the wall has no signs of water damage or leaking. I hate to bust open the wall unnecessarily. If I was to vacuum up the water and wait to see if the problem persists, and it does, what type of expert should I call? A plumber?
Is there any chance this could be a foundation problem? The only reason I ask is because recently a nearby door has started sticking. I hope it is just coincidence, but again, if there is a major problem, I'd rather take care of it sooner rather than later.
chuckster wrote:

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You got water soaking up the carpet and think you don't "have a major problem" and expect it to go away on its own yet "take care of it sooner rather than later"? Somehow, those don't go together. :(
1. You already have a problem--how "major" it is is yet to be determined. It is almost certainly not going to fix itself. 2. Do you know where the A/C condensate drain runs? It certainly isn't unheard of for one to have been run through an interior "wet wall" to an existing drain 3. It is quite possible for something like the stool flange to be seeping and running under the baseplate to be sucked up by the carpet pad and show no other sign. It's also quite possible it could be a pinhole similar to the other suggestion running down a stud or a supply line and wicking along the baseplate as noted. It undoubtedly isn't a big leak in supply lines or it would have shown something on the wallboard as you note, but there could be something deflecting it from hitting the wallboard directly. 4. If you aren't going to investigate on your own, better call the plumber Monday AM 5. The door is _probably_ a red herring wrt to the leak, but anything's possible.
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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OPEN THE WALL! Any one who comes out will do this and charge you a fee, even if they can't fix it. Is the foundation wet? Clogged gutters? Missing some flashing? Dry the area and spray some water in the area with a garden hose. Roof leaks will find their way to the floor this way too. HUGE TIP! Open the wall, spray with bleach solution, and let it dry to prevent mold growth. I feel your pain on opening the wall but mold will take over and you will have MORE problems, and then you will have to open the entire room to remove it. Mold loves dark, damp areas, and grows fast. Wall repair is cheap and easily done if you make neat cuts, with a jab saw.
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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Yes, unless you spot the cause of that leak immediately and it is outside the wall, open the wall. Wet Vac that water up! Put a fan or blower on it to get air moving briskly. spray a little bleach water on the inside wall if you want to, but be careful that stuff will discolor most carpets.
It could be a leaking shower pan. It could be any number of things suggested by others here. You must deal with this immediately. Notify your insurance agent; you don't have to make a claim. He'll tell you what to do. You have a responsibility to mitigate the damages that are happening. If you let them go your insurance may not cover damage that might have otherwise been covered. It is probably minor right now, but it will get worse.
If you can dry it up, watch it! If the water comes back immediately, it's probably a leak in the water line. Feel it! Is it hot or cold. Smell it! If the new water smells bad, then that might tell you something. If it gets worse after a bath or shower, that tells you something. If it gets worse after you flush the toilet.... If it only happens on very hot humid days when the compressor is working overtime....all these things can tell you something. The plumber charges by the hour and the more you can tell him, the less time it will take........if it is plumbing. It could be a leak in a roof, or even in a pipe in the slab where a plate was fastened to the floor by a Hilti or Ramset and the fastener nicked a pipe in the slab, but it only now broke through all the way.
You caught this thing in the early stage. Don't delay. Get it repaired quickly.
Randy R. Cox
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Please post a reference to an authoritative study saying mold is lethal. I don't believe you'll find one. Just an urban myth.
chuckster wrote:

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Stubby wrote:

Would you consider the National Institutes of Health authoritative?
"Aflatoxin is the best characterized of the potential human mycotoxin carcinogens. While it is acutely lethal in large amounts, chronic low-level exposure produces cancer, particularly hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in many animal species. It is thought to be the most potent liver carcinogen for a variety of species including humans..."
Other molds also considered.
http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid 5304
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HeyBub wrote:

Thank you. I will forward to Dr. Dean Edell, the TalkRadio doctor that constantly challenges the mold crowd. In all fairness, we need to see may studies that reach the same conclusion.
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Am I going to put my health in the hands of a "Radio Expert"? - I think not! Mold is hazardous to most of the population, and some "experts" think that is what killed the explorerers who entered King Tuts Tomb. Try to sell a house with mold. There are many links to mold, so don't just listen to one person. Does anyone remember when Asbestos was considered safe??
Stubby wrote:

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It still is safe if handled properly. Just touching it won't do any harm.
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I still consider asbestos safe. My house is covered in it.
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Well... I guess the toxic mold "got the best of" the "original poster", since he never got back to us. :) I wish people would get back to the group and let us know what the outcome was, he had many great suggestions given to him.
Goedjn wrote:

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HeyBub wrote:

following in the section on "problems with the reports....
"Thus, despite the claim that there was a causal association between moldy houses and wheezing, there was no supporting objective evidence. Some studies which claim that moisture and mold were associated with respiratory infections, cough, and wheezing (again with no objective measures) also fail to show differences in asthma prevalence between case and control schools (409, 410). Other authors report that despite claims of symptoms being more prevalent in case groups (reporting exposure to fungi, pets, mold odor, and dampness), actual asthma prevalence was no different (177)."
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Stubby wrote:

They have to put those disclaimers in government reports. All they're saying is that there is no evidence. Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence. Anyway, your original question questioned the lethality of mold, not wheezing in dank dungeons. It is possible, evidently, to keel over dead without wheezing, respiratory infection, cough, asthma, etc.
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Bleach is very likely to bleach his carpeting, which will look bad forever.

I've had plenty of wet carpets in my house, from little spills to bathtub overflows, without ever any mold growing. I've also had plenty of wet basements, with mold growing only once. It stopped growing when the basement dried out, and didn't cause any medical problems at all, not even sneezing.
I suppose we don't know what molds cause the most problems or who reacts badly to mold, but I also suspect there are mold killers other than bleach, that don't damage carpet, and that in most cases, nothing needs to be applied immediately. He can wait to see if he actually gets mold.

I have to admit it. My friends and I had a big party at your house. We didn't intend to cause damage.

Sure. Can a garden hose spray to the west without spraying to the east?

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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

May we assume that this is slab construction?? If so, the bath supply lines (Hot/Cold) are likely buried in the slab. And leaking...
Step #1 is Turn the Main water supply valve off now. (And OFF when leaving ofr vacation...)
Then you can call the insurance agent.
Jim
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I gotta agree with the poster who suggested a leak in a slab line, especially since no one was home for a week. You should probably pull the carpet and pad up anyway. The pad will have to be replaced or thoroughly dried before the carpet can be reinstalled after the leak is found and fixed. Once the carpet is up, you can vac the floor as dry as you can and if /when more water appears, you should be able to see where it is coming from. If it is indeed a leak in the slab, the best bet would be to have them rerouted and bypass the slab lines. If both hot and cold are in the affected area, do both, not just the one that is leaking. Larry
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you've gotten many good suggestions.
Wet vac he carpet thoroghly. At the very least, peel back the carpet and pad so you get look at the slab. (assuming slab foundation). dry floor well and look for leaks. Likely there is a seam in the carpet at the door. cut the threads of this seam to allow pulling carpet and pad back.
lee h
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The ORIGINAL poster will be posting next month about a SERIOUS mold problem and wants help on how to deal with it without opening the wall. Just wait and see. He recieved many tips but no response back yet.
lee houston wrote:

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