My Slow Cooker Takes Too Long

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I like using my slow cooker, but it takes way too long to cook stuff. Some foods take 6 - 8 hours. Can you imagine such a thing?
I wonder if I should hook it up to a 240 circuit. That should cut the cooking time in half.
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e

i realize this is a joke/troll, but just to play along..
Watts = V^2/R
so if you hook it to 240 instead of 120, it would take 1/4 the time.
Mark
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ome

That is asssuming that it did not explode or something worse.
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wrote:

To unpeel another layer of the obviousness onion, it wouldn't do so much good for "slow cooking", either.
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ome

Idiot. Watts = Volts X Amps X PF So it would be twice the watts if the volts were doubled.
Also. Watts = amps X amps X resistance.
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Some

As usual, the village idiot has once again demonstrated his incompetence. Mark has it right. With a resistance load, doubling the voltage increases the power (watts) by 4. That is because of the simple fact that doubling the voltage also doubles the current. 2 x 2 = 4.
Got it now harry, or as usual, do you want to argue on and further make an ass of yourself?
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wrote:

f. Some

he

Too late, he did that years ago.
Harry K
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Your all wrong. The element will heat increasing resistance. Power will be less than 4 times. My cooker will start to boil liquid around the sides after a while. I don't think there is a thermostat. I'm guessing the low uses a series diode.
Greg
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. Some

e

e

That's true if you want to get into second order effects. But this isn't a light bulb filament. It's a heating element in direct contact with water, so the temp of the element probably isn't going to change dramatically. For example, for heating elements for spas and hot tubs, the rated power is given as 4X when going from 120V to 240V. The one in my spa is rated at 1500W at 120V, 6000W at 240V. With the cooker you'd see some increase in resistance and it wouldn't be exactly 4X, but it would be in the ballpark.
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My cooker has a removable ceramic pot. There is air between the pot and inner metal wall, and the heater is on the inside. For the pot to get to boiling, the air must be a lot hotter. I could try measuring it, but probably not.
Greg
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On Sat, 20 Apr 2013 23:53:31 -0700 (PDT), harry

Ah, so if volts doubles PF drops in half? ...on a heating element? This must be some Brit physics to add to the Usenet physics flying around here.

Where did the PF go, harry? More Brit physics?
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Harry, I'm not going to debate this with you, there is no point. But I do have some advice for you, before you call someone an idiot, be SURE you know what you are talking about. Have a good day.
Mark
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ome

+1
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On 4/21/2013 3:35 PM, DD_BobK wrote:

Pedantic response - The cooker would produce about 4x the heat (briefly, before it burned out).
As Frank notes, the heat may boil out the water, which does not improve the cooked product.
In any case, cooking rate, like other chemical reactions, in general approximately doubles for every 10 degrees C temperature rise.
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On 4/20/13 6:36 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

You could put more wood on the fire. You could grease your electrons to the current would flow faster. Is this the place to mention WD-40?
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On Sat, 20 Apr 2013 20:08:57 -0500, Dean Hoffman

Does something need to be lubricated?
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On 4/20/13 9:38 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Derby Dad's electrons must be rusty if his slow cooker is slow. Maybe percussive maintenance would be the answer.
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Oh boy, here we go again...
How many times do you have to be told that WD-40 is not duct tape.
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On 4/20/2013 6:36 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

That's nothing, I have a fast cooker that cooks too fast. I wonder if I hooked it to a couple of flashlight batteries if that would slow it down? It's hell when you try to cook something and it cooks before you can get a plate from the cabinet. o_O
TDD
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I can't get the spirits and ghosts out of my medium cooker. It keeps moaning, and asking why I killed it, and calling for "Rosabelle believe". Which seems to be a magic code. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
That's nothing, I have a fast cooker that cooks too fast. I wonder if I hooked it to a couple of flashlight batteries if that would slow it down? It's hell when you try to cook something and it cooks before you can get a plate from the cabinet. o_O
TDD
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