My new well water level dropped 140' in 4 years!

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On Sep 8, 10:10pm, The Daring Dufas <the-daring-du...@stinky- finger.net> wrote:>

Yeah, I remember the northwest Alabama one. Scared a lot of people and made the insurance companies wealthy when people flocked to their agents for earthquake coverage. Haven't had one since AFAIK.
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wrote:

Things the well company would NOT be aware of would be developments where water shedding has been diverted or is being collected for some purpose and the aquifer is thus not being replenished at a rate which can sustain the normal level of the water table...
Another thing a well company would have ZERO clue about would be a construction project which has penetrated the water retaining layers of soil in the OP's general area and the water level is lowered due to the leakage of the aquifer due to the disruption of the those layers...
Another classic trader bullshit reply... Not even knowing where the OP is located or how many other people are in the same aquifer as the OP and assumes that his knowledge of hydrology and geoscience is superior to everyone else's when he has ZERO knowledge of the site conditions or the number of customers who might be calling the well drilling companies to complain -- the OP might just be in an unlucky location where the natural underground flow of water has been blocked or disrupted for a vast number of causes, he doesn't know, apparently the well company doesn't know so some research has to be done to attempt to find the cause of the drop in the level of the well, your assumptions aside, YOU don't know anything beyond what the OP has stated and there are not anything which could be described as proper facts given to be able to so conclusively state anything in the manner you have done here...
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Things which Evan would not be aware of:
Aquifers are something well drillers are VERY aware of. It's there business, because, well, that's where the water is. And acquifers typically cover large areas. You don't just drop the level of water in an acquifer 140ft in one localized spot. And you don't drop it 140ft by collecting or diverting, unless that is some major project, which again, a well driller is going to know about. If a major acquifer that a lot of people are using drops that much, it should be all over the news, with people having severe problems.
You really think he's going to go to some state water board and they're going to tell him, "Oh yeah, the xyz aquifer at 200ft has dropped 140ft because of the new dam on the whacko river..." and the local well driller isn't going to know about it? Maybe, but not very typical in my world.

You did read the part about the water level dropping 140 ft, right? That means the well itself must be significantly deeper than that. What kind of construction projects in your experience take out retaining layers of soil 200ft down, below an aquifer? How does one get the necessary DEP permits for that?

As usual, so far I don't see anyone agreeing with you.
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wrote:

Not necessarily. My driller went to the bottom of the aquifer, as evidenced by soil composition, and then backed up about 10' to prevent silt clogging. So the fast majority of the well is above the pump and not below.

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On 9/7/2012 2:36 PM, Steve wrote:

the water pressure was fluctuating. I had the well drillers measure the water depth and it had dropped 140' from where it was. Has anyone heard of this drastic water table change before? Is it possible my well collapsed? I am in northern CA.

Sure. Wells even go dry around here. The various irrigation companies have been badgered and sued and who knows what by the environmentalists about how much water they draw from local rivers. Most of them are replacing the canals with pipe.
The pipe stop the water leaking from the canals and eventually the companies may leave more water in the rivers.
However, many wells within a mile or so from the canal have gone dry. They were drilled into seepage from the canal, not the water bearing formations. Lots of law suits, but no joy! All wells have to be drilled much deeper and into the water bearing strata.
Our rental property in Redmond, Oregon has a 350 ft. well. Our home well 15 miles North is 650 ft. deep. Wells East of Bend Oregon are up to 900 ft deep.
So, where are you exactly in Northern California? Any irrigation districts in your area?
Paul
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any earthquakes in area recently?
in any case how much will a new deeper well cost?
no matter the actual cause you need a new well:(
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Nope.
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may have been any time since the well was drilled......
in any case you need a new deeper well, the cause is secondary at best........
which would be someone doing something illegal that somehow effected the water table.....
so what was your drillers cost and depth estimate???
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Anywhere near McCloud?
http://stopnestlewaters.org/communities/mccloud-ca
The website is out of date, but the problems remain.
nb
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