My neighbor was scammed by driveway spraying scammers

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It happened yesterday. A truck cruised in our neighborhood and I saw them stop by our neighbor's house (we have a concrete driveway, his is asphalt) and they talked. Then I went to do something else, the next thing I know is that my neighbor's asphalt driveway was sprayed with some tar like substance. So I went to talk to see what happened.
He said that he was scammed: they first agreed on a certain price ($175), they took the money, sprayed half of his driveway, then acted all surprised and said that "it takes a lot more coating than they expected" and demanded $50 more for finishing the work. I guess with the implication that if he did not pay, they would drive off with his driveway half sprayed looking really stupid. So, he said he paid extra $50 and they finished the work.
So. I am aware that the general wisdom says do not give work to any "drive by" people. But I would like to know, let's say that due to poor judgment, it happened to me and these artists demand extra $50 to finish. What would be a sensible thing to do in these lousy circumstances?
i
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"Ignoramus6369" wrote: (clip) What would be a sensible thing to do in these lousy circumstances? ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Ask to see their business license, and start dialing city hall on the cell phone. The problem is, the same brain that got your neighbor into that situation is trying to get him out of it. The best way to get out of trouble is to stay out in the first place.
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Ignoramus6369 wrote:

At my age, my rules for a happy life are:
1. Never stand when you can sit.
2. Never pass up an opportunity to take a leak.
3. never trust a fart.
4. Never waste an erection.
and most importantly...
5. Never pay tradesmen in advance.
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
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And I think #5 is key here, unless he was gonna have sex with the contractor too, then #4 would apply.
These driveby seal coat guys are well known for having a high percentage of scammers. I would never use one period, because even if you pay them at the end, you don't know what they put down. And you can bet many of them use the cheapest crap that will look good right after it goes on, but might not last a month.
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Around here we have several companies that put flyers on the doorknobs in advance, specifying the price and saying when they expect to come around and do the work. We use a service which was recommended to us by a satisfied customer (we even actually saw his driveway done before we placed our order) and which accepts a personal check. They just did our driveway for the third year the other day and it's great.
The fun we have is watching the changes from neighborhood to neighborhood. Most offers on our driveway are around $45. Similar-sized driveways in ritzier neighborhoods get quoted from $75 ro $175 by the same companies. :)
--
Boycott KFC
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2007/05/10/nkfc110.xml
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On Sat, 12 May 2007 12:43:02 -0400, Jeff Wisnia

to win a race with a pee hard back to bed.
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On Sat, 12 May 2007 12:43:02 -0400, Jeff Wisnia wrote:

If a contractor is doing work that requires him to make significant material purchases, paying half, or paying for the materials, is perfectly reasonable.
--
As he backed away from Maryann, away from his rope, away from his
intentions to harm her, and, hopefully, away from his image of himself
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well lost, assuming they are con men.
Years ago I hired a reputable landscaper to put in a 6 course retaining wall. They put in 5 courses and said they were done. When I complained he said he had used up all his budgeted materials, so there was nothing he could do. I was going to sue him, and I would have certainly won, but my wife begged me not to. It was very painful to let that go.
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Ignoramus6369 wrote:

Make an On-Topic posting in the right group?
Nick
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Poor judgment in the first place. Second, having work done without a signed contract. Third, not taking their license number and calling the police.
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Would you think that the police would have any interest?
i
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It depends on the jurisdiction. In some places, they might consider it grounds for fraud. In others, they would refer you to the proper civil channel to connect to. And then lots of time, these guys are just "casing" and return later to pick up loose items at houses where they know what kind of car is parked in the driveway when someone is home, whether or not you have a dog, etc. It really all depends on the local authorities, and you'd have a better chance in a small town where the police are less busy than in a big city.
HTH
Steve
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Likely a truck from a county job or a school job or such - had leftovers and made money on the side... No return to sender.
I hope the 'oil' they sprayed sets up and turns firm. Often it is very high in oil and doesn't setup.
We had our road system - 15 houses - have shale bits about 2" deep and then a heavy screen over it.
The other process - we liked better - oil down and then stones. This one spread stone for some time. The first one - the oil trapped the stone - and when we rode on it - the stone meshed between lower and upper oils.
Martin Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net TSRA, Life; NRA LOH & Endowment Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot"s Medal. NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member. http://lufkinced.com /
Ignoramus6369 wrote:

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Martin H. Eastburn wrote:

Perhaps someone could explain what this Home Depot stuff is like? Here in the UK there is whats called Colas. A Coal industry product. this is an emulsion ie water miscable till it dries then its like rubber solution/ water proof and wont dissolve in the rain. Its not normally available at our equivalent Home Depot store but is available in 45gall barrels. Its been used here in the UK for as long as I can remember. Has a smell of ammonia about it till dry.
Its very dk brown when out of the tin and black and shiny when dry. Used under stone chippings and as an adhesive before fresh tarmac is applied to an existing road surface. Not the same as tar tho. Hope someone can enlighten me. Ted Dorset UK.
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wrote:

Home Depot? That's a big retail store that combines electrical, plumbing, gardening and nursery, paint, lumber, millwork, roofing, siding, tools, and cleaning supplies among other things... All in one place so you don't have to make 10 separate stops at specialty shops to blow your entire paycheck on home repair supplies.
But that part you probably already knew... ;-)

They sell that same basic coal-tar emulsion coating compound, but in the 5 US Gallon (4 Imperial) pails so you can do your own driveway. Of course, the steel pails and lids cost $5 dollars plus, and the shipping eats a lot more, so you're paying for the convenience.
The professional coating companies here get the same emulsion coatings in bulk in their truck from a regional supplier. They could probably get it in (55 Gal US/45 Imp) drums, but then you have to deal with the mess of someone handling (~500 pounds/ ~225 Kg) tapping and dispensing from drums, and handling & returning all the empties and dealing with drum deposit fees... A 500-gallon tank bolted down on the back of a truck is a lot easier and cleaner to deal with, just open the valve.
--<< Bruce >>--
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wrote:

even months after application.

--
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That is the same stuff we used. So it seems.
As I recall - If you are having it done - ask about Type I and Type II.
One is under the stone and the other is over the stone. Over is best. And we did it every 4-5 years or in sections as needed. A storm dropping 20 inches in a couple of days might blow out some road...
I'm out of the rain forest and into the rain plains.
Martin
Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net TSRA, Life; NRA LOH & Endowment Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot"s Medal. NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member. http://lufkinced.com /
ted frater wrote:

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Maybe, maybe not. Depends if the cops are on the take, how busy they are, and if the seal coaters are out and out scamming, as in spraying used motor oil instead of driveway sealer.
In the Chicagoland area it's not at all unusual for legit companies to go neighborhood to neighborhood sealing driveways. At least three different companies come around our area every year. I always have a look at what they are doing at the neighbors house first, negotiate them down a whole bunch second, and pay them AFTER they are done and I'm happy with the job. I can usually get it done for right around what I pay for the stuff in 5 gallon pails at Home Depot. I've never had a problem.
I find one of the best ways to get these annoying jobs done, like seal coating or power washing, is to wait until a neighbor has hired someone. Then mosey on over and see if you can get a deal by offering them a quick side job. Tell him you'll pay cash, and they can start as soon as they done with the neighbor. Unless, of course, they are doing a lousy job at the neighbors.
YMMV.
--

Dan

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Your local police must be very skilled and have a lot of time on their hands if they get involved in civil small claims issues and are expert enough to evaluate the chemicals the workers are using. In most jurisdictions they wouldn't have the expertise or authority.
D Murphy wrote:

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called criminal fraud. The expertise is another kettle of fish, but that is easily bought on the open market.
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