My gift to those of you still running Win-XP: The ability to get Microsoft updates for 5 more years

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Ok, I've been too hard on some of you.
So for those of you that haven't caved to peer pressure and are still running Windows XP - a gift:
The ability for you to continue to receive updates, patches and fixes directly from Microsoft via WindowsUpdate until the year 2019.
This is no joke.
Use notepad to copy the following and save as .reg file - and then run it (double-click the file).
=========Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\WindowsEmbedded\ProductVersion] "FeaturePackVersion"="SP3"
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\WPA\WEPOS] "Installed"=dword:00000000
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\WPA\WES] "Installed"=dword:00000000
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\WPA\PosReady] "Installed"=dword:00000001 ========== Restart your computer, and make sure WindozeUpdate service is running. You will see there are updates for you to install! And your XP PC will continue to recieve MS patches until the year 2019.
This is for 32-bit XP. There is a different method for 64-bit version of XP (by spoofing Windows 2003 server).
This trick works because for the purposes of WindowsUpdate, it makes WU think you're running POS2009 (Point Of Service 2009) which is basically XP for cash registers and other "point-of-service" PC's. Microsoft provides update support for POS2009 until 2019.
Enjoy.
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On 05/22/14 10:41 pm, HomeGuy wrote:

But I can well imagine that the desktop version of XP and the POS version differ in significant ways and that the updates for the POS version may even have an adverse effect on the desktop version.
Perce
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On Thursday, May 22, 2014 11:22:06 PM UTC-4, Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

oductVersion]

Exactly what I thought. Homelessguy is proposing that you put the updates for Microsoft's embedded version of XP on your desktop PC. Just because they are built on the same OS core doesn't mean that there aren't differences that could cause a disaster. This is the first time I've even heard anyone recommend taking OS updates for one OS product and try to trick a different version into accepting it. And I for sure wouldn't be editing my registry based on some crap he posts here.
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http://www.neowin.net/news/microsoft-warns-against-registry-hack-that-allows-windows-xp-updates
Microsoft warns against registry hack that allows Windows XP updates
Yesterday news came out that a registry hack would allow Windows XP users to still receive critical security updates, despite the OS being no longer supported. Now Microsoft is publicly warning folks against using this method to update their machines.
The registry hack would allow XP users to mask the fact their machines were using an unsupported OS. Microsoft’s update servers would register the machines as using Windows Embedded POS Ready 2009, a version supported until 2019. Users would then be able to download certain updates; however it's not clear which updates would actually work or fix anything as the operating systems differ from one another.
On this note Microsoft has released a statement to ZDnet warning users to not use this hack. The company says this will likely do more harm than good.
"The security updates that could be installed are intended for Windows Embedded and Windows Server 2003 customers and do not fully protect Windows XP customers. Windows XP customers also run a significant risk of functionality issues with their machines if they install these updates, as they are not tested against Windows XP."
It's pretty obvious why Microsoft released this statement. After all, it's not like they'd urge users to go on hacking their machines and misleading the company's update servers. Then again, they do have a point in that these updates aren't tested against XP which can create problems, and may not even offer any protection to those systems that employ it.
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On 5/22/2014 9:41 PM, HomeGuy wrote:

I tried it and it just said "not a valid registry script"
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philo wrote:

You don't include the "===================" lines I put in to mark the start and end of the text.
And you save it as a "text" file, but either rename it to .reg before or after it's saved as .txt.
=========Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\WindowsEmbedded\ProductVersion] "FeaturePackVersion"="SP3"
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\WPA\WEPOS] "Installed"=dword:00000000
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\WPA\WES] "Installed"=dword:00000000
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\WPA\PosReady] "Installed"=dword:00000001 ========== If it still says "not a valid registry script" then do a search on your system for other .reg files and open them in notepad and compare how they look vs what you've created based on my instructions above.
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On 05/23/2014 07:28 AM, HomeGuy wrote:

yes, I did not include the lines and I did save the file with a .reg extension.
I'm back on my Linux system now and will fool with it later.
I know how to manually edit the registry so may do it that way if all else fails.
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Even if it works, that would be risky. Microsoft has no commitment to making sure their XP embedded updates work on normal XP. Even then, it would only be for security patches. Office programs are not licensed to run on Embedded. That means the majority of patches would be for IE8. But Microsoft has now stopped offering security patches for IE8, and IE9+ won't install on XP. (And anyone using IE8 has got bigger problems than worrying about XP updates.)
Given all of those exceptions, I wonder how many, if any, patches will come through for XP Embedded. And do you really want to take a chance of frying your system?
Oddly, Microsoft is continuing XP updates to a number of companies, and probably governments, who are willing to pay for it. They're going to create, test and provide updates to XP. They just won't let most of their paying customers get them.
| Ok, I've been too hard on some of you. | | So for those of you that haven't caved to peer pressure and are still | running Windows XP - a gift: | | The ability for you to continue to receive updates, patches and fixes | directly from Microsoft via WindowsUpdate until the year 2019. | | This is no joke. | | Use notepad to copy the following and save as .reg file - and then run | it (double-click the file). | | =========| Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00 | | [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\WindowsEmbedded\ProductVersion] | "FeaturePackVersion"="SP3" | | [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\WPA\WEPOS] | "Installed"=dword:00000000 | | [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\WPA\WES] | "Installed"=dword:00000000 | | [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\WPA\PosReady] | "Installed"=dword:00000001 | ==========| | Restart your computer, and make sure WindozeUpdate service is running. | You will see there are updates for you to install! And your XP PC will | continue to recieve MS patches until the year 2019. | | This is for 32-bit XP. There is a different method for 64-bit version | of XP (by spoofing Windows 2003 server). | | This trick works because for the purposes of WindowsUpdate, it makes WU | think you're running POS2009 (Point Of Service 2009) which is basically | XP for cash registers and other "point-of-service" PC's. Microsoft | provides update support for POS2009 until 2019. | | Enjoy.
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On 05/23/2014 08:45 AM, Mayayana wrote:

I was willing to give it a try as I don't use XP anymore so if my old XP install broke, it would have been no big deal.
FWIW: Any updates that cause a problem can be rolled back by either uninstalling them or performing a System Restore.
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On 5/23/2014 8:24 AM, philo wrote:

My fault, it worked fine. Thank you!
The text editor I used changed the format a bit.
Now, do you know what the hack is for XP_64 bit?
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Mayayana wrote:

===============Windows Embedded POSReady 2009
Based on Windows XP Service Pack 3, this version offers more features over Windows Embedded for Point of Service V1 such as Full Localization and XPF Support if .NET Framework 3.5 or higher installed. It is the first version of Windows Embedded that can use the Windows Update Agent to update an installed and deployed image. Mainstream support will end in April 2014 and extended support in April 2019. ================ By the way, the trick or hack that I posted should *probably* not be tried on any XP system that has not been updated to SP3.
Many XP enthusiasts are installing and experimenting with POSReady 2009. One very nice thing about it is - it doesn't perform online validation during installation, so a working product key (for which many exist in the public) will continue to work and can't be deactivated by Macro$haft.
POSReady 2009 FAQ:
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee406170 (v=winembedded.0).aspx
================What is the difference between POSReady 2009 and Windows XP Professional?
* Windows Embedded POSReady 2009 contains the following Embedded Enabling Features:
o File-Based Write Filter (FBWF), which redirects writes to disk to RAM and helps protect the underlying OS image. o USB Boot, which allows installation from a USB key.
* Office productivity applications are not licensed to be run on POSReady. * POS for .NET is included with POSReady. * POSReady does not contain Help files, which reduces its footprint. * Both products use the same management software.
For more information, see POSReady 2009 vs. Windows XP Professional (PDF).
http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId 9099 ================
Oh yea, about the "Office productivity applications are not licensed to be run on POSReady" -
Well, that restriction exists only on paper. All versions of MS Office that will run on XP will install and run on POSReady 2009.
Milkro$haft simply doesn't want corporations and institutions to run POSReady on desktop PC's in place of XP, and simply stating that Office is not "licensed" to run on POSReady is enough for IT people to be afraid to even try it.
Also note that you don't buy POSReady directly from Macro$haft - it's provided directly only to OEM equipment makers. But images of the OS have leaked out to the public.
So for those of you that claim the two OS's could or are likely to contain key incompatibilities at the file level regarding future updates and patches - there is really nothing to back up such a hypothesis.
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On Friday, May 23, 2014 10:25:49 AM UTC-4, HomeGuy wrote:

px

You're looking into the wrong end of the telescope. What we haven't seen is anything to support your hypothesis that the updates for embedded XP can be safely applied to XP for desktops and that those updates are worth doing. And no one said anything about incompatibilities at the file level. It's that you're taking fixes designed for and tested on one OS and putting it into another OS version, which while similar, it was not targeted for or tested with. Soemthing for embedded windows XP gets shoved into XP Home and who knows for sure what happens?
What you're suggesting is that folks set up their PC kind of like a ticking time bomb. It would be set up to look for and to try to install updates for embedded XP for the next few years. Any one of those, something very bad could happen and you could have a corrupted PC. To me, that risk is more real than worrying about future security problems with XP.
Your new caveat:
"By the way, the trick or hack that I posted should *probably* not be tried on any XP system that has not been updated to SP3. "
That isn't very reassuing either. What else haven't you thought about?
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| Also note that you don't buy POSReady directly from Macro$haft - it's | provided directly only to OEM equipment makers. But images of the OS | have leaked out to the public. |
That's a whole other issue. You're talking about using an illegal product. On top of that you want to let it call home to MS for updates? I expect you'd probably get away with it, but just to be on the safe side, I don't think I'd call the police to ask about the best route out of town if I'd just robbed a bank. :)
| So for those of you that claim the two OS's could or are likely to | contain key incompatibilities at the file level regarding future updates | and patches - there is really nothing to back up such a hypothesis.
I'm questioning whether there's any value at all in the potential for updates. There won't be any more updates for IE8, so what patches do you really need? XP Embedded may not even have standard networking functionality, in which case you wouldn't get anything like that. In other words, you won't know what you might be missing. Yet you're risking XP stability.
There's no way to be sure what compatibility issues there could be. That's why Microsoft defines supported vs non-supported. They promise to maintain supported items. Not so with unsupported items. They could break compatibility simply out of spite, to thwart people trying to use this hack. Similar things have happened with programmer functions. Microsoft guarantees that supported functions will work, but unofficial functions, Registry settings, etc -- that MS uses but doesn't officially offer to 3rd-party programmers -- often get changed willy nilly. No one can complain because MS specifically didn't list those functions and settings as supported.
In any case, suit yourself. I'm just warning anyone who might want to use this hack that they're taking a chance with dubious benefit. Personally I wouldn't allow Windows Update to function, anyway. I'm running XP SP3. If they came out with SP4 I'd install it only after it had been out for awhile. If you're worried about security on XP then *don't use IE*. Beyond that, disable script if possible, and if at all feasible, do not install Adobe Acrobat, Java, Flash, or Silverlight. Script is connected with nearly all online risks. Many depend on one of things I listed above. None of those things is necessary for most people. Flash is used mostly for animated ads. Java is usually only used on corporate intranets. Silverlight is a failed attempt by Microsoft to create a highly functional, interactive webpage functionality. Like Adobe AIR it's been pretty much supplanted by high-efficiency javascript. Adobe Acrobat is a bloated mess. There are other, more lean PDF readers, and you don't need to use PDF browser plugins. (See Sumatra, PDF-Exchange Viewer.)
For optimal protection you might try Firefox with the NoScript extension, which allows you to enable script easily and only when it's absolutely necessary. With that you'll be far safer than the average Win7 user, and you won't have to risk your system to Microsoft's beta dripfeed for another OS.
For further protection, curtail your online shopping. EBay just got hacked the other day. That's a good example of new risks. It used to be one had to worry about wiseguys attacking with malware and ruining one's computer. Then the risk became Russian and Chinese criminals, installing sneaky malware that spies to get credit card numbers or other exploitable information. Now, increasingly, the risk is in electronic transactions themselves: online shopping, buying gas with credit cards or debit cards at hacked gas pumps, using hacked ATMs, buying groceries at stores with hacked card-swipe appliances, etc. If you don't do anything on your computer that requires you to type a charge card or bank account number then you'll improve your security a great deal just through that. But of course, that's not acceptable for many people. If you're an Amazon addict or EBay denizen you can't afford such risks. Though everyone can at least avoid online banking.
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On 5/23/2014 9:21 AM, trader_4 wrote:>> > >Enjoy.

Just sit back and wait. If this really works, it will be all over the 'net in a couple of days.
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On Friday, May 23, 2014 12:42:29 PM UTC-4, Congoleum Breckenridge wrote:

The only problem is you won't know if it works or not for awhile and never for sure. MSFT just issued an update for that latest security problem for XP, which occured just after they had EOL'd XP, but they decided to do that one more for everyone anyway. So, there are no new updates as of now that you can't get for XP home, pro etc that would require you to bootleg the embedded XP version. When any come, that's when you'd find out what happens. And then only for each update, with no guarantee that the next update won't cause some unknown problem.
What you're doing is saying OK, shove any future embedded XP updates into my home XP system, whenever they happen to be released in the future. I think potentially that is a more serious problem for a system than not getting updates period. Particularly since as Mayayana pointed out, a lot of security bugs have been in Internet Explorer, the last two versions of that won't run on XP, and IE AFAIK, isn't even a part of the embedded XP product.
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Do I need those updates?
I have two computers that I control from a KVM switch. Both computers run Windows XP Professional Edition with Service Pack 3 which I have on a CD.
I use one computer almost exclusively for business and the other for internet surfing.
If I get a virus or malaware on my surfing computer, I simply format the hard drive and reload Windows XP Pro and my Favourites. It takes about a day, but I do this kind of work on a Saturday when I'm also doing something else, so it's no hassle for me to reload Windows XP.
I never get a virus on my business computer because it rarely ever sees the internet.
Do I need those additional updates if it's no hassle for me to reload Windows XP if and when I get a bug on my surfing computer?
--
nestork

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alt.home.repair:

I'd say no. Any functional improvement features have already been installed to XP by SP3 and there will be no more. Any possible updates will have to do with network security. If your computer doesn't touch the Internet, they won't apply to you. The computer that does touch the network is somewhat vulnerable, but if you don't keep any sensitive personal information on it, it's probably not a big risk.
Besides, these "updates" don't sound safe to me. I wouldn't touch them with a 10-foot pole.
You might consider making a disk image of your Internet computer when it's set up the way you like it. The image can be restored much more quickly and with less intervention on your part than you manually reinstalling the OS and everything.
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wrote in message

back in the day when windows was just a user interface, the first thing I would do to a new computer is rip out (or fully disable) windows, and just let the DOS programs rip. People were amazed at how fast my computer was.
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On 05/26/2014 09:46 AM, Pico Rico wrote:
[snip]

I seem to remember something about the real purpose of Windows being to slow your PC down so you need a new one.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.us
  Click to see the full signature.
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Dave;3240473 Wrote:

Dave:
2 K worth of memory on the Voyager missions? That's amazing. Do you know when they were launched?
We're very much living in an age of change. Years ago I wondered what people would do with home computers... other than their income tax returns. They very much seemed to be an answer looking for a question.
Now, the way things seem to be going is that computers are becoming specialized to each task. You have a computer inside your car that monitors your engine and maximizes both power and fuel economy, and when it detects an impact does a whole bunch of calculations based on the speed of the car and the weight of the driver and passenger, and decides which, if any, airbags to deploy; all in 20 to 40 milliseconds. There are computers in the cash registers at every supermarket that do nothing but read UPC codes all day long and spit out the price for each UPC code. I once wondered what people would do with their own home computers, and now I'm finding out that instead of us using computers, it's us using everything we have, and everything we have has a small computer inside it. Even our frost free refrigerators have computers that decide when to defrost the fridge evaporator coils based on the humidity and how long the fridge door has been open.
--
nestork

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