My dryer doesn't work. Is it the motor?

I've got a Frigidaire dryer. Model FDEB23RGS1. About six years old.
Lately, when run, it's made more noise than it used to, and would sometimes just shut off mid-load for no apparant reason after about 30 minutes or so. I'd then have to wait a while and then it would run for a while longer.
Now it only runs for a few seconds and then shuts off. Even if it's only in the `Cool down' part of the section. The dryer definately isn't overheating, at least not the heater part.
I've opened it up and cleaned it all out. The amount of lint was scary -- obviously I should be doing that a lot more often.
I've disconnected the drive belt and tried to run just the motor and blower, and it runs for a few seconds, then the pitch of the `hum' gets higher and higher as the motor slows down and then it stops after a few seconds. It sounds like it's working too hard and tripping something. It won't run again for a while, but then it resets or something and will run for a few more seconds.
Unplugged, I can turn the blower or the motor, but it seems to have more resistance than it should -- but that's just my opinion, I've not worked on these before. (Remember, the drum belt is disconnected at this point, so I'm not moving the drum.) It turns easily enough by hand, but the moment I stop turning it, it stops going.
The drum itself seems to turn easily enough. There's a good deal of friction, especially in the front (where it just slides on foam and plastic) but it doesn't seem unusual. (But I'm not certain.)
Back to the motor/blower -- it doesn't make any unusual noises when I turn it by hand, but I'm guessing that the bearings on the motor or maybe the blower are shot. But shouldn't I expect to hear something? I guess it could also be that the brushes have popped out of place or something?
I know how motors work, but my experience is with small DC can motors, not 240 V AC motors, and guess my next step is to remove the motor and blower assembly and see what I can find.
The dryer has a four prong plug. (It's an electric dryer, if that's not obvious.) This wouldn't be three phase power, would it?
(Hmm, I do have the schematic. Duh. Looks like it's got L1, N and L2, with 120 volts between L1 and N, and 120 V between N and L2. And I guess the last plug is ground. Except that N is the ground, according to the schematic. Eh?) Either way, it doesn't sound like three cycle power, which simplifies things.
.... though when I look at the motor on the schematic, it looks like it's got six lines coming in, from L1, L2, N and various switches. So I'm not clear how I'd run it on the bench, or if it needs 120 volts or 220 volts. (But my guess is 240 volts.)
I'm guessing I won't easily be running it outside of the dryer.
Should the motor turn easily enough that I can spin it up with my hand and it'll keep running after I do it?
Is it likely that the blower assembly has failed? (My guess is no, that it's something in the motor, since there's a lot more in the motor.)
Looks like the motor (131560100) is available online for $130-$160, or I can get it on Ebay for $50 except that there it's called `Electrolux Motor, Main with Pully'. Sounds like the same motor, but it's hard to be sure. Or should I just remove the motor and blower and bring it to somebody who's got actual experience here, rather than just my theoretical knowledge? :)
(Is it even cost effective to repair a motor like this compared to just replacing it? Especially if I can do it for $50+$20 shipping? Perhaps I should just order the motor and be glad I think I can fix it myself? :)
--
Doug McLaren, snipped-for-privacy@frenzy.com
Okay, brain. You don\'t like me, and I don\'t like you, but let\'s get through
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Doug,
I don't claim to be an expert, but all the dryers I've seen operate on 220 volts for the heating elements and the motor operates on 120 volts. The motor should turn fairly free with no belt attached. The blower attached to the motor pulls air outward from the drum. There is a sensor or two there for safety reasons so the motor/elements will be cut off should be belt break. And I believe those bearings in the motor are sleeve bearings , not ball bearings. Try running the motor outside the dryer with the blower off. If the motor gets warm and trips then I would just get a new motor. Since the sensors are not that expensive, you shouldn't overlook one of those being bad. Since you have the schematic, you should be able to tell which sensor controls the motor. Oiling the sleeve bearings in the motor would only be a temp solution if they are going bad. Six years old -- I'd bet on the motor.
Joey
Doug McLaren wrote:

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| I don't claim to be an expert, but all the dryers I've seen operate on | 220 volts for the heating elements and the motor operates on 120 volts.
And after taking the motor out, it does say it's rated for 120 V, and it's pretty obvious by looking at the wires where the power should go.
(The schematic, on the other hand, is not entirely clear about what's going on in the motor. Actually, it's available online -- http://www.frigidaire.com/products/resultspage.asp?strmodel ūR211A, click on Wiring Diagram. The motor part is rather cryptic -- or at least to me. I'm more familiar with electronics than `electrics'.)
| The motor should turn fairly free with no belt attached. The blower | attached to the motor pulls air outward from the drum. There is a | sensor or two there for safety reasons so the motor/elements will be cut | off should be belt break.
Not in this case. The motor would run without the belt connected.
| And I believe those bearings in the motor are | sleeve bearings , not ball bearings. Try running the motor outside the | dryer with the blower off. If the motor gets warm and trips then I | would just get a new motor. Since the sensors are not that expensive, | you shouldn't overlook one of those being bad. Since you have the | schematic, you should be able to tell which sensor controls the motor. | Oiling the sleeve bearings in the motor would only be a temp solution if | they are going bad.
Actually, oiling the bearing/bushings made a huge improvement on how easy the motor was to turn manually. I've oiled it up and will go ahead and put it back in the dryer and see how it goes. I'll also order a new motor -- at $70, I imagine I'm getting off cheap.
(The bearings/bushings don't look to be replacable.)
| Six years old -- I'd bet on the motor.
Good bet :)
Thanks!
--
Doug McLaren, snipped-for-privacy@frenzy.com
"If something\'s worth doing it\'s worth doing for money." -Gordon Gecko
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"Doug McLaren" wrote:

Basically, the motor uses a centrifigal switch - when the motor gets to a certain RPM, the DPDT relay is activated. When this happens, the start windings change from NC to NO, and the 240VAC is switched from NO to NC via M1 and M2.
What this means is that when the motor spins up, the contacts in the centrifugal switch on the motor switch on the heating elements - no spin, no heat.
As far as your symptoms, definately shot bearings in your motor.
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Doug McLaren wrote:

Hi,
Cetainly -sounds- like the motor may be sour.
http://www.pcappliancerepair.com/cgi-bin/promote-detail.cgi?affiliate_id=AppAid&item 1560100&brand=WCI
Motor is 110-120 volts AC....looks like from M4 and M5 a test cord can be attached directly to the motor to run it by it's self.
jeff. Appliance Repair Aid http://www.applianceaid.com /
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hai,
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From what you said, it's most likely the motor going bad. However, connect the motor directly to the power line using a cord connected to L1 and L2. Plug it in and see if it still does this. If it does, be sure that blower is not jammed full of lint. Motors in home appliances are all 120v. Look on the motor plate for all the info.
The motor bearings could be partially stuck. The motor should spin easily. If bearings are stuck, lubricate them (which may mean tearing the motor apart if it dont have grease or oil fittings.
That motor on Ebay may or may not be correct. You must consider the voltage, horsepower, shaft size, direction of travel, and of course the mounting. Ebay sellers are not appliance repair persons, and may tell you anything to make a sale.
Finally, some appliance shops have used motors from dead machines. You may get a used replacement for the same price as Ebay and be able to return it, if it dont work.
Mark
On Sat, 29 Oct 2005 02:11:01 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@frenzy.com (Doug McLaren) wrote:

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