My details on "no spin" Kenmore or Whirlpool "Motor Coupling" upgrades, and washer repair.


My Details about "no spin" Kenmore or Whirlpool "Motor Coupling" washer repair.
The follow is stuff I didn't find on the Internet after what I learned; while fixing my Washing machine.
We purchased a Kenmore Washer and Dryer (consumer recommended) set in late 1996.
In 2001, a large load broke the "Motor Coupling" which I read is common and just about the only weak point of this time developed 1996 washer. This original (1st one) coupling (coupler or whatever) shredded the rubber center piece.
The 2001 $10 replacement piece (2nd one) is a new design(one of many) of the triangular type, not like the factory included parts drawing and round disc. I have been told the rubber is of harder and better design. This lasted until now, December 2006.
The 2001 park broke (now 2006) with a new blanket for the kids that was made of some super absorbent material that I could hardly lift out of the washer after getting wet. We had often washed king bedding with no trouble. The thing of note is that the rubber center piece did NOT shred and only had its holes stretched. The side (of two plastic piece) did NOT break off at the pins but did split the plastic base that goes on the motor and transmission shafts. Though it did NOT ream out the plastic around the shaft. The plastic flat piece just broke like as if it were a plate that was cut from top to bottom, not from side to side. I think this was an FSP brand.
So now I purchased a (3rd short lived) "Supco" (after market?) brand motor coupling set for $8 shipped. As soon as I washed a load of towels (as usual) it reamed out one of the plastic pieces around where it slides on the the shaft. I've now seen reference on the Internet saying after market couplers don't last. The "FSP" Factory Specified Part" label ones instead, are supposed to be the best and I think that is what lasted from 2001 to 2006 for me.
I have noticed an after market brand that has a metal plate in the rubber part too. I've also noticed stitched core reinforced rubber center pieces. These are sometimes referred to as commercial grade or heavy duty or super heavy duty. Just based on what I have personally seen, the (newer) harder rubber part is sufficient and the problem is the plastic.
I read an OPINION that contrary to popular belief, these things do NOT need to break (to prevent damage) but just provide rubber cushioning (and maybe from tearing your clothes). The Idea being that the breaker would trip before damage. I do not know. Yet, I do think a stronger one is in order.
I also read that stuff like torn towels can wrap under the agitator and break the coupling trying to turn the stuck clothes it its agitator movement (like a full load of towels).
Sears order center (call up till Midnight) was only able to tell me that their $14 part was a substitute. I wanted to know what was better about it and the rep was clueless. It may be possible to call sears and learn the newest part number of these upgraded couplings.
I found out that the number ending in "A" currently means the center of the plastic pieces has a new METAL sleeve well embedded into the plastic (not the rubber piece); where it slides on the motor shaft. This takes care of the reaming out problem.
Note:(Addendum to other on-line repair how to sites) Put the plastic pieces all the way on the shaft first (new metal sleeves require moderate hammering to the stops on the shafts (where you can see the shaft all the way in) so I went ahead and disconnected and removed the motor for better access. Make sure the four rubber motor face bushings are good too. This takes some load off the coupling or at least reduced play that may snap your plastic. I turned mine around by hand. Don't forget to reconnect the motor (4) connectors and don't forget the screws in the motor brackets after you are done with the couplings). Then slip the rubber piece on the motor first and line it up with the one on the transmission; as you clip the (heavy) motor in, top first and add the screws. Continue with putting every thing back together.
In 2001 I went up from the bottom but that was working upside down and moving the heavy washer and dealing with drain hose leaks. Do not disturb your washer. Do it right. If you have plastic cover on the sides of your washer controls, place a large flat head screw driver under them and gently pry up from TOP TO BOTTOM (floor to ceiling) direction, not side to side. Then you can get to the two screws that allow you to roll the control panel back and that is what those plastic hinges on the back are for. DO NOT unscrew them or anything on the back wall. (WATCH FOR EXTRA HOSES around the lid on deluxe models after un-clipping the washer surround),
So, their are many "grades" of these couplings and I found no other information explaining the following.
1. The original piece of crap with the round plastic pieces as in my factory included spec drawing.
2. All the various updated ones that follow.
Rubber center: A. Harder rubber piece (I guess this is good enough)
B. Threading in the rubber thus reinforced
C. Metal plate inside the rubber (after market?)
Plastic ends: (technically not exactly the same but inversed) New triangular looking. A. After market (same manufacture? Inferior plastic?) Reamed out on me.
B. Nice metal sleeved - well embedded FSP brand Sears recommended (No I don't work for them)
Conclusion: I decided the newer and harder rubber piece was fine enough and wasn't the problem for me. In any case, the plastic could break. I wanted the metal sleeved plastic pieces because the Supco after market brand reamed out on me.
I called a local parts shop and was informed they had learned, the part with an "A" at it's numbered end was the latest recommended and sleeved (FSP brand) and it was $14 bucks. I got it for $12 cash and it is working fine. I'm sure I can get it back off; should the plastic break at the cost a few more minutes. I'm glad to have the metal sleeves. I did not also get the reinforced rubber piece (that's about $35 for set shipped on over-priced Ebay) as the rubber did not break on me last time. Is it worth it, since the plastic is not reinforced; accept for the metal sleeve? That's up to you.
It may be wise to get a spare.
Your mileage may vary and if you have a family (who doesn't have large loads) like me, I hope this information has been helpful. I shudder to think how rewarded the manufactures have been for this weak part, both in service calls and just getting a new washer. It seems the trend is toward integrity and stronger parts though.
I'm sure next year will bring on yet another rendition. Here's to progress and leaving the cheap ones out of your washer.
Please add your helpful experience and part info to this thread.
I would like to know: Is an unbreakable coupling part wise? Will the breaker protect?
Can't we reinforce the plastic; out to the pins?
Do reinforced (commercial) rubber pieces really last longer (assuming you have the harder rubber)? Wouldn't the plastic just break instead?
Have you ever had the FSP brand (non sleeved) ream out inside the plastic?
What is the hardest grade of plastic and what is used in these couplings?
Can anything else be done to help prevent broken motor couplings?
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snipped-for-privacy@flashmail.com wrote:
...[saga re: washer couplings]...

Yes, don't overload the washer.
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Not rue. A lot of damage can be done before a breaker trips. Breakers offer electrical, not mechanical protection. Many products are protected with breakable couplings, shear pins, or breakaway devices. They are designed to protect the mechanical parts from damage under unusual conditions.

NO.
There are so many compounds of rubber and plastic that this questionis unanswereable. Not to say a different design would be better or not, but just to say plastic or rubber is superior to the other is impossible.

Is it possible that you are overloading the machine? Running it off balance? Just because the stuff fits in the drum does not mean it should be loaded that tightly. It may not be the best design, but in any case, you have to live with it and find a workable solution. Where I work, we have about 25 motor and pump combinations that have a similar type of rubber coupling. Some run 24 hours, 5 days a week for years on end. When they break, it is either from many years of use, or a mechanical problem that would have been much worse if the coupling did not let go.
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Many people think that the couplers are meant to break so they can protect the rest of the machine or a circuit breaker. That is just plain silly, simply because the prongs of the coupler are too tough to break under the various scenarios that the gearcase would lock up. And they don't break because of overloading the machine either. Here's the truth: the prongs break because they are made of plastic, and plastic can break over time.
The coupler with the metal sleeve is the standard part available on the market today. The commercial-grade coupler with the reinforced rubber piece is also available, but it is a mystery as to where this part ends up. I have never installed it on a machine, nor have I ever seen it already installed. It is debatable if this commercial-grade coupler will last longer in normal operation.
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Hey, settle down with the "don't overload it" attitude. Obviously I posted this as my experience and didn't hide the fact that the super absorbent blanket was over tolerance. It's kind of tough to judge until it gets wet though. So, all you light load experts out there, be sure to take your new gifted blankets out back and hose them down and hang them on a scale before you put them in the wash. I'm actually not the one who put the blanket in the wash by the way. Also, nothing was ever, stuffed into this "Heavy Duty - Super capacity" top of the line washer. We read the manual. I think it's a good idea to warn you about those theme type towel that granny likes to get the kids. You've got to get the pea out of them some how or don't you have kids?
I'll see you out in the back yard, in the snow, washing pea out of your heavy stuff with a garden hose. :P
Secondly, the "Supco" after market coupling reamed out on a regular load of towels that I personally reduced and was no where near the maximum towel load we usually do (for Five years) but was a big load. If I can't do a load that size anymore, I don't want it.
So yes, I too (lecture), Don't overload! So why can't we make a washer to handle family needs? Maybe it has something to do with ump-teen (technical term) renditions of the darn coupling. it's been made stronger, that's a fact. What that means is overloading has changed. Now the washer can do more. That's a fact. Maybe it should handle what fits. No one is suggesting that grape-to-wine-making type stomping stuff in the machine is correct, wise or expected to clean. We have never failed to leave slack. I understand some people are stupid. We are not (and we balance loads too), and cramming is not the issue. Better washers are.
Also, I agree that it doesn't make since for a breaker to be the only protection but I also think the plastic may just get old and I have notice this is where it breaks. I guess I'm hoping for a less likely to break part; like on the plastic from the new metal sleeve outward.
Hey, perhaps the part breaking is NOT is the best method to halt damaged when over stressed! Maybe there's another way. That way, one would NOT have to tear down and replace the coupling. Wouldn't it be better to clear and press reset?
Anyway, I just wanted the next guy, fixing his washer, to know the details when choosing a coupling. As I stated, this is and obviously from my one experience. if you have mutl-washer experience, please advise.
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    Hi,         I reckon the washer was probably over rated I personally use a 10kg load washing machine and have never used anything under 8kg. Too many people I know buy small washing machines, only to be stuck with short lifespans or many small loads.
    cheers,         Dex
snipped-for-privacy@flashmail.com wrote:

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glendagable had written this in response to http://www.thestuccocompany.com/maintenance/My-details-on-no-spin-Kenmore-or-Whirlpool-Motor-Coupling-180170-.htm :
Thank you so much for this info. You saved me so much!! Saved money and fewer problems. I had the exact same problem and with your help, fixed it, easy as pie. thanks again! ------------------------------------- snipped-for-privacy@flashmail.com wrote:

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