My amazing little Snow Joe blower

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re: "[Ariens??? 1950's??]"
Ariens used "thrower" from '52 through '79, even specifically saying "Throw (not blow) Snow" in their earliest brochures:
http://scotlawrence.smugmug.com/Snow-Blowers/Ariens/yardster-wallace04/1091948079_kTNvm-O.jpg
However, on their website today they say:
"Whether you call them snow blowers or snow throwers you can call Ariens The King of Snow®"
If you click on the either of those terms, you go to the same webpage describing their models.
For a pretty neat collection of Ariens brohures from days gone by, check out this site:
http://gold.mylargescale.com/scottychaos/ariens/Page12.html
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OK, I have the definitive answer to this pressing issue.
I started a discussion about these terminology options at http://www.opeonthenet.com ("The Best Snowblower & Lawnmower Forum.")
snowblower snow blower snowthrower snow thrower
After a few back and forths in the forum and some on-line dictionary searches, I finally concluded:
"I'm sticking with snowblower 'cuz it's easier to say and easier to type."
A moderator responded with:
"We did the same thing when discussing this site name. So that makes it official. ;-) "
Great minds apparently *do* think alike!
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-snip-

Cool page-- My F-I-L had one of the tractors with all the attachments-- That's where I remembered the Snow-Thro terminology from, now that I see it. He was always careful to call his snow *blower* [a 2 stage, 10 HP, something-or-other] a blower, and his Thro a thrower.

If it is good enough for ope, it works for me.<g>
Jim
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On Thu, 30 Dec 2010 05:47:21 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

Up here in Ontario that's the way it's been for decades. I used to sell and service the little suckers back in the sixties. And I explained WHY that distinction was made - which is kinda common sense.
Goes way back a lot farther than WIKI - which, by the way, DOES agree with me.

That's your opinion, and you are definitely entitled to it.

Most places that sell them today don't know squat about the product, much less what the proper namr for it is. Don't use that to base an opinion on!!!

Like I said - don't base any opinion on what resellers - particularly discount chinese crap importers, call what they sell today.

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On Dec 30, 3:04 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

See some of my other posts related to this question.
As I said, I'm going to go along with what they guys here say, which is "snowblower" for both single stage and two stage units.
http://www.opeonthenet.com
BTW...just because Wiki agrees with you doesn't make it the definitive source. For all we know, *you* wrote the Wiki article. ;-)
In any case, Wiki doesn't really agree with you, at least as far as the terms they use for the parts of the machine that actually move the snow.
What you (and everyone else) call the "auger" on a single stage machine, they call an impeller.
Anyway, it's no big deal...just interesting that there seems to be very little consistency in who calls which what.
I choose the easiest route:
"Snowblower" is the easiest to say and type, so I'm going with that.
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-snip-

Just for the record-- My postage stamp is a 2 car wide driveway 150' long. It has 2 turn arounds- and is on a wide state road so there is plenty of 'end of driveway'. Plus about 100' of sidewalk-- and I make a path around the house for the oil & gas deliveries- and the dog.
We get an average of 80" of snow a year-- but the last year I used just the electric, we got over 100"- a couple storms were over 18".

It is an electric single stage blower- much like my Toro 12amp.

Up to 6" of snow, the 12amp Toro is as fast as my 24" 7HP gas 2 stage. It is just narrower & I need to drag a cord around. Part of the reason they get so much power into throwing the snow is they only handle it once-- and no power is used to move the machinery.
6" or more of very wet snow-- and I challenge anyone with a 2 stage gas blower to keep up with the 12-15amp electric.
Once you get over a foot, the Snow Joe/Toro class of electrics lose some of their 'luster'. In packed snow they don't work well at all. [just break it up with a shovel, and scrape the pavement clean with the little guys]
A couple things that I can do with my electric, and not my big gas blower; 1. Cutting the tops off the snowbanks when they get over 8" high at the end of driveway-- Just pick it up in one hand, and watch it dig its way down- tossing that old snow 40feet into the woods. 2. Or doing the steps like it was a shovel. 3. Or emptying the puddle that sometimes forms at the bottom of the driveway. [I'm on a hill and the state uses a ton of salt- sometimes the river runs into the driveway. The single stage will toss that slushy water right over the snowbanks.

On the level, they pull themselves into the snow. Not so much on a steep hill-- but enough so it took a *lot* of snow to encourage me into re-incarnating my old gas blower.
I'm with the OP-- For $300 or so, they are *amazing* little machines.
Jim
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LOL, I got a laugh out of that comment.
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WW wrote the following:

That depends upon the wetness of the snow My tractor mounted snow blower will toss dry snow 30 feet, with wet snow, maybe 10 feet..

--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
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re: "...but each time it was just the plug coming loose."
That's easy to prevent. See here:
http://0.tqn.com/d/homerepair/1/5/5/D/-/-/cord_lock.jpg
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On Wed, 29 Dec 2010 08:24:57 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

Clever, but only for part of it did I need a second extention cord and that connection never weakened. It was the connection into the Snow Joe that kept coming loose. There is some sort of flapper thing that you run the cord through so that it won't come loose:
http://www.pcrichard.com/catalog/product.jsp?modelNo=SJ620
It's that thing hanging off the handle just above the second cross-bar. I didn't use it right though obviously. I'll figure it out before the next snowfall. I hope.
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-snip-

That's a nice looking machine. I looked at them 5-6 years ago and they were a lot more 'Toy-like'. [The one with a headlight is $189 on Amazon-- $10 less than the un-headlighted one?<g>]

I just tie a loose 1/2hitch in the cord around the handle to take the weight off the plug. I do it with the Toro blower and the Remington tiller I use. They each have different, but equally ineffective ways of holding the cord.
Jim
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responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/My-amazing-little-Snow-Joe-blower-611950-.htm DA wrote: dgk wrote:

Just looked at the PC Richard's listing thinking maybe to get one before it's too late but WOW: "Expected to ship from manufacturer: 01/22/11" In four weeks? In a middle of winter? I guess, they don't stock up on snow blowers (snow throwers?) in winter... The demand probably fluctuates so much from winter to winter. Otherwise you'd think they'd be making those all summer to have enough on hand for a time like this.
------------------------------------- /\_/\ ((@v@)) NIGHT ():::() OWL VV-VV
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On Thu, 30 Dec 2010 17:50:01 +0000, info_at_1-script_dot snipped-for-privacy@foo.com (DA) wrote:

That's how snowblowers are made (one run, once a year). In heavy snow years, they sell out. They're gone.
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On Dec 30, 1:55 pm, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

And what goes fastest, at least from the borgs, are the smaller machines.
MY HD and Lowes both have units left, but no entry level units - only the bigger machines.
Lowes has one that could probably do most of my driveway in one pass!
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wrote:

Yup.
That's what I ended up with mid-season (about this time of year). They knocked a couple of hundred off and threw in the cab, though, so the price was close to the entry model, earlier in the season.

A little exaggeration, no? ;-)
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On Dec 30, 2:26 pm, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

No, seriously, they had one of these left, tucked away in the corner of the garden section:
http://www.bibusbaugruppen.ch/images/hydraulik/Airport%20snowblower.jpg
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wrote:

ROTFLOL!
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I've had the Toro version for many years. It just gets used now for super wet snows, cutting the tops off snowbanks, or when my old beast dies. But I did a lot of snow for 3 winters with just the electric Toro.

The first pass is tough-- but usually you can shave edges off to do the rest. I put drift cutters on mine. Just screwed some 1/8x3/4 stock to each side. It will cut through a 24" bank. [or tunnel through a 36"<g>]

I'm betting that the single stage in your area might be the better choice. It works better on wet snow than a 2-stage-- and you don't need to worry about storing gas & oil. And you can work on the things, literally; 'on the kitchen table'.

I like mine because it is quiet enough and 'friendly' enough that both my wife and kids have taken it for a spin or two. They won't touch the 40 yr old, 7HP Bolens.
I'm not familiar with the snow joe- but suggest you get a spare paddle and whatever breaks when you grab a large rock. I couldn't find any parts locally for my electric Toro & had to wait a week the first time around. Now I keep spare skids, paddle, blade, and the crazy shear-mechanism on hand.
They are incredible little machines.
Jim
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wrote:

That's what I found worked well. Force through the first path, and then just keep edging 4-6" or so into it. A drift cutter is an interesting idea, but I'm hoping we don't get many more snows like that.

It was throwing the snow at least 10 feet - but it was so windy (~40 mph) that all it needed to do was get it up a few feet and that snow was GONE.

I'm not likely to hit a rock, I'm plowing a driveway and sidewalk - but I did read in some reviews that it was a problem getting replacement belts. The manual has instructions for replacing:
Rubber Plates Scraper Bar Belt Skid Shoes
So it's probably a good idea to get those at least.
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-snip-
I would have expected it to throw it further. Try shooting to the left and right - or straight ahead. Also vary the amount of snow in the 'hopper'- keeping it full, but not packed is what works best on mine.
Next time you get 5" of slush- look up and down the street at the guys with big 2-stage blowers cleaning their chutes at every pass. [that will make you feel better when you're fighting with day old snowbanks that are solid blocks of ice.<g>]
-snip-

Find out what shears if you hit the immovable object. A frozen newspaper-- dead cat-- homeless guy. . . . Maybe the belt just burns out. But it should have something to protect the motor. That's the piece you'll need 'all-of-a-sudden' at the worst possible time.
Mine has a plastic paddle, where yours is metal and rubber. I had a gas Toro with that style paddle. That sucker cleaned the pavement better than a shovel. Good stuff.
My plastic one does a good job & I think it throws further than a metal one would -- but the downside is- I went over a chunk of plywood with a 20d nail sticking up out of it. The nail cut the paddle into 2 pieces. At least I didn't step on it.
Jim
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