Must I gut the bathroom?

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break cast iron tub with sledge hammer or pick into easy to move pieces.
shower water by window causes big rot problem
definetely get some estimates, plumbers may have a good idea you havent thought of.
and definetly gut the bathroom
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Did you learn hygene from the homeless ladies at Grand Central?
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Christopher A. Young
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Old cast iron tubs might be worth money. I'd offer it on Ebay and Craigslist for a while before deciding to break it down.
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Christopher A. Young
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On Tue, 8 Dec 2009 12:22:41 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

I doubt it Stormin. No claw feet to make it interesting. Just a no-longer-shinny piece of metal. Ebay does have quite a few tubs but I think they're all new.
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Ah, that helps with the big picture. Carry on..... and thank you.
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Christopher A. Young
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On Dec 9, 8:14am, "Stormin Mormon"

DGK-
Don't be too hasty to dismiss Stromin's comment about the tub and swing that hammer. A cast iron tub (if removed from an installation) can be refurbished and re-fired....giving it a 2nd life of another 50+ years.
Ebay, though an excellent marketplace for many items, is not the ultimate arbiter of value. Once something gets beyond the UPS, FedEx, USPS "box it & ship it" realm, ebay is less useful.
A metro area craigslist would be the way to go. You could even list it BEFORE removal to see if there is interest. If you're really serious about being "green", keeping an old cast iron tub from the scrap heap earns oyu fair number of "tree hugger points".
One man's trash is another man's treasure......reduce, reuse, recycle.
cheers Bob
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wrote:

When I bought the house and was exploring the backyard, I found an old tub, just like this one, painted a hideous shade of red. It was half buried in a flower bed and I think was supposed to be a planter. I did somehow break it up and get it out.
I'll look into trying to get it out in one piece but with new ones going for $300, it's likely that whatever it's worth isn't enough. After all, once it's out, I could have it refurbished. There's a thought.
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The "new ones" (~$300) of which you speak are NOT the same a 70 year old cast iron ones.
cheers Bob
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Houses (walls, floors & fixtures) are not as easily destroyed or damaged in real life as they are on TV or in movies.
When you demo the bathroom, you;re only going to be going after (mostly) the "finishes"; tile, plaster, wood lath, etc.
An assortment of pry bars and small 2x4 chunks ( ~4" & 10" & 16") to use as impromptu fulcrums will be useful. Cutting piers, tin snips and a Sawzall style saw, also a decent sized framing hammer. A circular saw would be handy. Some medium to large sized pipe wrenches as well.
What IS your tool situation?
Take it easy with the "sledge hammer" btw I cannot recall my use of a real sledge hammer on an interior demo (of course I have a Hilt TE-54 rotary / breaking hammer). But seriously, you want to remove this stuff not pulverize into dust. I think you'll be surprised how little use a sledge hammer really is.
and most importantly...a roll of painters plastic & tape (to make a drape for the door opening to control dust). Allowing dust to migrate everywhere is going to piss of the roommate.
The window in the shower is only a problem depending on the sill desgin & material, window design & material. Wooden sills dont work so good in a shower....a tiled sill is fine. In any case the window will most likely be a lot happier with its own "mini shower curtain". There is a reason that most "modern" tub / showers have "high windows" or none at all.
btw I assume by "shower body" you mean a valve body that can do shower or tub? I would suggest getting a 4 1/2" grinder with a diamond wheel (& shop vac) cutting a nice rectangular section of the tile so you can cleanly access the existing valve body to eval the situation.
cheers Bob
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dgk wrote:

Anything is possible. It's only up to you to decide what you are willing to do. Before I retired I worked in the telecommunications industry, no construction experience at all. I built the house I'm living in. I hired contractors for the foundation, heating/AC and drywall taping. The rest I did with help from friends and family.
I should say doing the rest . I'm in the process of building my kitchen cupboards . Here's a few images of the house and a set of cupboards I built in the utility room for practice.
http://www.mts.net/~lmlod/cabinfront6.jpg
http://www.mts.net/~lmlod/cabinfront7.jpg
http://www.mts.net/~lmlod/cupboards1.jpg
http://www.mts.net/~lmlod/cupboards2.jpg
If your worried about the neighbors, start with a smaller hammer. The radiator can be moved and changed. Maybe underfloor? I know very little about your type of heating system.
Window in shower? I wouldn't do it, but many others have. As long as you can keep the water from getting into the walls it will work. Potential for major problems if you don't get it right.
That's the best part of DIY. You have as many chances to get it right as you want. There are no such things as mistakes, just learning experiences. I've had a few of them over the years.
You should post a few pictures of the bathroom. I would give others a better idea of what your doing. At this point I and others can't do much more than to wish you luck.
LdB
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http://www.flickr.com/photos/27610982@N03/?saved=1
Yes, I expect I will have many learning experiences with this - the SO will consider them something else.
Those cabinets look fine. I'll deal with the kitchen after the bathroom is finished. I'd hate to drop a tub on new cabinets.
I wonder what they use to separate attached houses? Cinderblock I think. I'll start by digging into the cement you can see behind the tiles in the first picture. There must be studs back there somewhere.
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-snip-

If there is room- like 5 feet or so- they just stick another house in there- http://weburbanist.com/2007/10/05/cramped-urban-living-9-of-the-narrowest-city-houses-in-the-world /
Doesn't really help you with your project- but at least you can take comfort in the fact that things could be worse.
Jim
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dgk wrote:

Not a lot of room to work with. Typical 5' wide pre yuppie bathroom. If it was up to me I would consider closing off the bathroom window completely and replacing your tub with a three piece completely enclosed fiberglass unit with a good set of glass shower doors. I don't much care for shower curtains and clear glass shower doors will help keep the space looking bigger. I have an enclosed fiberglass tub. It's big enough for me to shower in comfortably and it's easy to keep clean. As others have also mentioned a window in a shower is not a good idea. Just make sure you can get the new tub into the space before set off the first charge of dynamite. :)
Remove the existing shower and vanity. Move the toilet closer to the tub and use the old shower/toilet space for a larger vanity. By the way, my bathroom does not have a window, a fan is all you need. I have a heat exchanger that runs 24/7. It keeps the bathroom clear.
Replace the radiator with a baseboard unit. Put in new tile and flooring.
Lots of work and it will cost a bundle but if you do it yourself it will be worth it.
LdB
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LdB wrote:

Every shower I have ever seen with a window in it, the window had rot problems. Replaced more than one sill with rot-resistant material, but if the window is wood, it is hell to keep paint on it. I like daylight, so I'd replace the window with glass block, which can be tied right in to the water barrier layer of the shower surround. Replace the inside edge of jamb with something flush and waterproof, or inset it for a shampoo ledge. Outside can even use the original window jamb as framing, so you don't have to mess with the siding or whatever. It takes a little fussy carpentry to retrofit, but you can make it look like it was always there. If you have an exhaust fan, you don't even need the little air vent thing in the middle, which is a pain to keep clean and usually drafty in winter.
-- aem sends...
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When I did that with mine, I left the storm window in place, but I disabled its locks so I could open it from the outside if it were necessary.

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When I did mine, I put a wood handrail 33" above the floor, with 4 handrail brackets secured into the studs behind the drywall, from the edge of the shower stall to the bathroom door. Two coats of polyurethane. The function was to serve as a long towel bar, but also to serve as a grab bar for my wife if she got unsteady. A similarly braced handrail goes up the wall alongside the shower unit.
But a month later, I was involved in a hit & run accident, and my knee was injured and I had to wear a full leg brace. pretty damned difficult to sit on the pot, but I was able to hold on the rails and sit, or be able to stand by pulling up. It was made for my wife, but I used it first for several months.
Try it. Keep one leg straight as you sit down on the pot. My rails are 23" from the front part of the elongated bowl of the American Standard Cadet. Even nowadays, I find myself grabbing a bar getting up, it's awfully handy.

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I think I'd go to a cheap motel before doing that.

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<snip>

You're moving plumbing in a seventy year old house. You already know there is no better time to upgrade and no real alternative to gutting the bath and replacing what's there. Anything else is just asking for problems down the road and since you intend to retire, you don't want that kind of excitement.
If you can stall for a couple of years till your financial situation improves, do it. If it absolutely has to be done now, then either DIY, find a neighbour or a friends who can DIY, or pay a contractor.
Here (Calgary, Canada), 15 thousand to remodel a bathroom, including moving fixtures around, would be considered a good down payment.
HTH
Ken.
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it you could post a couple photos on a hosting site it would give the guys in the newsgroup a better idea of what's up
where is the home located? 15k+ is in the ball park
Is this the only bathroom?
Has the house been re-piped? How long have you owned it? My SoCal 1930 home just got the last of the original glavanized steel water pipes replaced in 2006.
Complete demo is quick & easy and gives the contractor a "clean palette" on which to work. "Saving this" and "working around that" makes his life more difficult. Plus if you;re wanting a firm/fixed price all the "futzing around" is going to add uncertainty which he has to price in as contingency.
If this is your only bathroom (with a shower) it complicates the logistics.....if you have another functional bathroom, you could "poor boy" the job byt doing it in stages BUT your wife would have to be on board with that.
All sorts of compromises can (& most likely will be) done. Removing the stick-on floor tiles is doable, as is adding more tile to the floor BUT that will raise the floor a bit and if the exisitng floor is cracked, the cracks might telegraph through the new stuff.
I didn't understand your wall tile description.
I agree with the other posts.......showering in a tub is a PITA. Better to have a tub AND a shower than only a tub shower. Also how often is the tub used? Our single tub (we have two separate shower stalls) gets used less than once a month.
You've gotten a lot of good comments in the other posts.
cheers Bob
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DD_BobK wrote:

Okay, I'll bite, what's wrong with showering in a tub. I mean, sure, if you've got both, go for it, but I fail to see the problem with showering in a tub that has a proper surround.
Jon
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