Multiple Water Regulators

At my home, I assume as it is in most homes, we have one regulator on the water mains. However, if we take two showers at the same time, the water pressure is low in both showers. It's not bad, it's just aggravating. We have plenty of water pressure from the city.
When I first started writing this post, my question was whether it made sense to have the incoming mains branch to two water regulators instead of feeding two showers off of one regulator. Now I'm wondering whether the regulator is just not doing its job. It's doing its job to keep the water pressure at a normal level for a single shower or for sink water, but it's not maintaining the water pressure with the demand of two showers. It's been that way since we've owned the house for 25 years.
I'd hate to replace it only to find that it's working as it should. Any thoughts?
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If I had to guess, I'd suspect that being old it may have corroded up somewhat so that it can no longer fully open to meet the higher demand. Another possibility is that it was sized incorrectly to begin with. What pressure is it set to? And have you checked to see what it is maintaining? Can you check the pressure/flow rate ahead of the regulator? That's another lesser possibility, ie that the restriction is not the regulator but before it for some reason.
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On 4/11/2013 8:10 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Since he says it's been that way for 25 yrs already, I suspect the more likely culprit is just does't have enough capacity in the supply to the two.
Would be interesting to know what the pressures actually are, but whether the second regulator would help would depend on where it's placed in relation to feeding the two. If it's still in front of the small line it won't make much difference.
Was a thread not too long ago on dual regulators -- I posted a link to a site that had pretty good description of when would help a problem and how if OP wants to search back a couple months...
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On Thursday, April 11, 2013 5:50:47 AM UTC-7, mcp6453 wrote:

http://www.homedepot.com/p/t/100175467?catalogId053&langId=-1&keyword=pressure+gage&storeId051&N=5yc1v&R0175467#.UWbGh1Hn_IU
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Water regulators have a flow rate at the outlet pressure. It may be that the regulator is not rated for enough flow for two showers at the same time. You need to look at the flow rate of the regulator and then see how much flow you are using at one shower at a time. If no other way, let the shower run in to a bucket for a given time, say one minuit and see how much water is collected and calculate the flow per miniut or hour.
If it is not rated for the ammount of flow you want , then it will need to be replaced with a larger one. It may also be the pipes in your house will not support that flow rate. You may be able to find charts on the internet that tell how much flow a given size pipe is rated for. No mater how much pressure you have, a given size pipe will only let a certain ammount of liquid flow.
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Another option might be to see what the flow rate of the showers are. Might be very free flowing heads and the answer is to put in new heads that flow less water.
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I thought about doing two, but you need two water heaters. The branches must be separate, feeding from meter. Might need two meters also ??
Greg
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Look at it like this. Think of a garden water hose. If you have very high water pressure, a kink in the hose will not reduce the presssure at the nozzle as long as the flow is not very great.
You may have a restriction in the water line on the supply side of the regulator. No matter what you set the regulator at, if there is a "kink" in the supply line going to the regulator, no matter what you do at the regulator, the "kink" will not allow sufficient water flow for two showers. You need to establish where the restriction is in the process. If it is before the regulator, there is nothing you can do except call the City to complain and be prepared to spend $$$ for a new supply line.
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It's probably just stuck. Remove and dismantle it and free the parts off. Clean up with fine wire wool. If there are any severe wear marks/grooves you will have to replace it.
The other possibility is that your pipes are semi-blocked with crud/ limescale/corrosion. If the pipe is iron/steel this is quite likely. If so the pipes will need replacing.
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On Thursday, April 11, 2013 8:50:47 AM UTC-4, mcp6453 wrote:

water mains. However, if we take two showers at the same time, the water p ressure is low in both showers. It's not bad, it's just aggravating. We hav e plenty of water pressure from the city. When I first started writing this post, my question was whether it made sense to have the incoming mains bra nch to two water regulators instead of feeding two showers off of one regul ator. Now I'm wondering whether the regulator is just not doing its job. It 's doing its job to keep the water pressure at a normal level for a single shower or for sink water, but it's not maintaining the water pressure with the demand of two showers. It's been that way since we've owned the house f or 25 years. I'd hate to replace it only to find that it's working as it sh ould. Any thoughts?
Regulators do have a flow rate and yours may be low. That's not that commo n though. Before doing anything measure the actual water pressure below an d above your regulator. You may simply be able to adjust it higher at the regulator. A higher pressure will result in higher flow through the same s ize pipes. Giving you more water at the two showers even when they are bot h on. I like to see something around 70-80psi in residential but you can r un it up to 90 or 100 without ill effect. Higher does tend to increase lea ks at fixtures.
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he water mains. However, if we take two showers at the same time, the water pressure is low in both showers. It's not bad, it's just aggravating. We h ave plenty of water pressure from the city. When I first started writing th is post, my question was whether it made sense to have the incoming mains b ranch to two water regulators instead of feeding two showers off of one reg ulator. Now I'm wondering whether the regulator is just not doing its job. It's doing its job to keep the water pressure at a normal level for a singl e shower or for sink water, but it's not maintaining the water pressure wit h the demand of two showers. It's been that way since we've owned the house for 25 years. I'd hate to replace it only to find that it's working as it should. Any thoughts?

ommon though.  Before doing anything measure the actual water pressure be low and above your regulator.  You may simply be able to adjust it higher at the regulator.  A higher pressure will result in higher flow through the same size pipes.  Giving you more water at the two showers even when they are both on.  I like to see something around 70-80psi in residential but you can run it up to 90 or 100 without ill effect.  Higher does tend to increase leaks at fixtures.
And burst weak pipes and hoses!!!!
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snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:

water mains. However, if we take two showers at the same time, the water pressure is low in both showers. It's not bad, it's just aggravating. We have plenty of water pressure from the city. When I first started writing this post, my question was whether it made sense to have the incoming mains branch to two water regulators instead of feeding two showers off of one regulator. Now I'm wondering whether the regulator is just not doing its job. It's doing its job to keep the water pressure at a normal level for a single shower or for sink water, but it's not maintaining the water pressure with the demand of two showers. It's been that way since we've owned the house for 25 years. I'd hate to replace it only to find that it's working as it should. Any thoughts?

though. Before doing anything measure the actual water pressure below and above your regulator. You may simply be able to adjust it higher at the regulator. A higher pressure will result in higher flow through the same size pipes. Giving you more water at the two showers even when they are both on. I like to see something around 70-80psi in residential but you can run it up to 90 or 100 without ill effect. Higher does tend to increase leaks at fixtures.

Hmmm, Regulator w/o pressure gauge? My house water pressure is set at 60psi according to the gauge reading when water is flowing.
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Never been in a house that doesn't loose pressure. First thing, measure pressure. Like said, measure both sides at same time, while running showers, etc. Read flow rate on regulator and compare to others. I hooked up a regulator to the feed hose on the trailer last year. Bought one with high flow and good so far. 60 pounds is a good maximum pressure.
Greg
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too many shut off valves of the standard type can decrease flow. the passages are very small. sometimes a washer can fragment and decrease fow too..
ball valves are better
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wrote:

Up here (waterloo Ontario Canada) we don't have regulators and if I'm in the shower and the wife runs the washer or flushes the john I don't see or feel any difference at all.. one inch feed, 3/4" to the softener. 1/2" to the water heater.
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*What size is the water service pipe coming into your house? I suspect that you have a problem with the volume of water, and not the pressure. Maybe your water main is too small for multiple showers or perhaps you have galvanized pipes with restrictions.
You could try adjusting your existing regulator to increase the pressure to see if that makes a difference.
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mcp6453 wrote:

Do you NEED a regulator?
If your municipal supply is derived from pumps, you probably DO need regulators inasmuch as pumps and such may not be getting the kind of attention and maintenance that's appropriate.
If, on the other hand, your local water supply is gravity fed (think water towers), the pressure is almost solely determined by the height of the tower, not by any downstream regulators. That means the pressure delivered to your house is virtually constant.
Measure before and after the regulator to be sure...
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Sure, a gravity fed system is "constant" but it may be higher than is safe for residential plumbing.
I wonder if the OP (or others) are confusing the term "pressure reducer" with "pressure regulator".
I have gravity fed water and need a PRV (pressure reducer valve). The street pressure is well over 80 and makes my pipes bang. The PRV brings it down to about 60 which is fine for 2 showers at once. There is a decrease in the strength of the shower when both are running, but it's barely noticeable.
One way to solve the 2 shower pressure issue is to share the same shower.
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