Multiple lights, same circuit

Okay, I'm sure this is not uncommon, but I can't find anything online or in my wiring books to provide an example...
In my front entry I have 5 light switches in one box and they're all on the same circuit. One cable coming in from the service panel provides the power. I'm replacing the switch, the box, and probably the wiring, so I want to do this the proper way.
It seems odd that six wires (one from each light plus the power wire) get tied together in one wire nut. Right now they're soldered together (50+ year-old house), but I know that this isn't code. What would be the proper way?...Two groups of three linked by a heavier gauge wire?
So I guess the question is: How do you connect 5 or more wires together?
Mike
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What you have is correct and proper. Today, we don't solder much, but you can get wire nuts to accommodate the six conductors
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On Fri, 27 Jun 2008 16:32:14 -0700 (PDT), upand_at snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I haven't done any electrical work since 2000, but I remember seeing these in a catalogue. I have never used any.
http://www.idealindustries.com/products/wire_termination/twist-on/term-a-nut_pigtail.jsp
Of course, they would probably cost big bucks unless you buy bulk.
For home use, you could just wire nut 3 together with an extra wire for the other 3. There is no reason to oversize the wires.
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metspitzer wrote:

http://www.idealindustries.com/products/wire_termination/twist-on/term-a-nut_pigtail.jsp
Or you could use "spec grade" switches with back wire screw terminals with the little clamps and pigtail from one switch to the next with no wire nuts at all.
nate
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Nate Nagel wrote:

I use those back wire outlets and perfer them even though they are over $2.00 each (Leviton in red label box). However, I can't seem to find switches with the back wire connections (only the blue box - side screw type). I have only looked at HD & Lowes though.... Kevin
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Kevin Ricks wrote:

Yes, it never ceases to amaze me how people will use the cheapest outlets and switches they can find in their homes when only one related problem, even if it doesnt catch something on fire, will pay for the added cost.
Building on the cheap will always cost more in the long run.
Jimmie
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upand_at snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

This is what I do for the hot sides of the switches (and outlets). I run a single wire from switch to switch. I strip the insulation back at each switch and wrap the wire around the screw terminal without cutting the wire. Much less clutter in the box that way and you end up with only one wire to connect to the power feed wire, or no wire nut connection at all if the power feed wire is long enough. I sometimes do this with ground connections as well.
You can put the 6 wires in 2 bunches if you want and it may be easier to distribute the wires from one end of the box to the other. The connecting wire need not be a larger gauge. Use 12 ga for 20 Amp circuits and 14 ga (or 12 ga) for 15 Amp circuits.
One house I lived in had soldered connections which was a real pain. If there is enough slack in the wires I just cut the solder joints out and use wire nuts. If not enough slack you end up having to make pigtails or unsolder and re-solder connections as it is almost impossible to put wire nuts on previously soldered joints. Also heating the wires up enough to clean the solder off, burns up or makes the insulation brittle. Then there is that old gummy electrical tape to deal with. I believe code still allows soldering.
Kevin
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I like this idea.
Thanks all.
Mike
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On Jun 28, 9:59am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

If it's a15 amp circuit that wire strapping the input to all the switches could be 14 AWG and thus easier to bend around the screw at each switch having stripped back the insulation at each. With five switches however it may be a 20 amp circuit?
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