Multifunction Tool - does anyone use lower speeds with this tool?

It seems to me that the high speed vibration is this tools big advantage, and that slowing it down will just make it shaky and less effective. Do you really use the lower speeds for anything useful?
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wrote:

Wish I could remember better and say for sure, but as I recall when I used my variable to cut out door stops to fit in thresholds, I had it cranked all the way up even when starting the cuts. Same when sanding with it. Just used if for those 2 things so far.
--

Vic


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Bob F wrote:

Every once in a great while, I'll use a lower speed on my hand drill - such as putting a hole in a steel bar, but most of the time, even with a drill, it's full military power, all ahead flank.
Come to think on it, do they even MAKE a variable speed power saw? Or table saw? I have used "double-speed" soldering irons and multi-speed Dremels, but there aren't many tools with selectable speeds.
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Some variable speed tools:
Sabre saws, jig saws, reciprocating saws, routers, random orbital sanders, palm sanders, drill presses, belt sanders, bench grinders, angle grinders, lathes, polisher/buffers, engravers and band saws.
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

Oh. Thank you.
On reflection, there is a universe of variable-speed tools: Hammers, screwdrivers, wrenches of all sorts.
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That's a good way to ruin bits (and your arm ;-).

Do you use different sized blades on your saw? (Dados are usually smaller because they do hog out far more wood, thus take more power). Drill bits vary over at least a 30:1 range, so need a variable speed. Keeping the (linear) speed of the cutting edge (more or less) constant requires a variable speed. This isn't an issue with a saw.
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While I've never used a variable speed multifunction tool, I've often wished I had one. When my single speeds dies (possibly before that) I'm buying the variable speed model.
There have been many times when I've used my single speed MF tool and felt that I would have more control if I could slow it down, just like I do with my router, sabre saw and reciprocating saw.
I read this at a site that reviewed the Fien oscillating tool, the original "MF" tool:
"Another useful feature that the device boasts is the Variable Electronic Speed Control that is perfect for optimizing the use of power. You can switch to high power control for those rough projects and then switch to a low variable speed for projects that require finesse and delicate handling."
That's what I've wished for - the finesse, for getting into small spots without the tool oscillating at full speed.
Start this video at about 1:45 and listen to guy who says he runs the Fein at 2 out 6 for most jobs for the same reasons as listed at the review site.
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If all you ever cut is wood of similar density, using the same type of blade, don't mind heating up the blade unnecessarily and shortening it's life, and don't have any really detailed things to cut, then a single speed is just fine.
None of the above applies to me, so I have a variable speed unit.
R
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