Mulch and Carpenter Ants

We just had several yards of mulch laid up against many parts of the foundation of our house. It's a very dark color and has a very strong odor. My wife said it smells like horses. Do you know what type of mulch this is called?
One Problem is, I didn't think of it but we recently had a major problem with carpenter ants. Will this dark mulch laid up against the home attract the ants to the house? I know mulch retains moisture, and also know that carpenter ants love moisture, so was this mulch a mistake?
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Billy wrote:

They have nested in wet structural wood, dead limbs in old hedges, hollows in trees and in landscape timbers. I have no worry about carpenter ants that are outdoors and not in structural wood, but cleaning up the dead stuff got rid of them. They are not a problem unless they forage indoors, in which case the more immediate problems are available food spills, openings they use, and trees that contact the roof.
Did you buy mulch or compost? Compost is usually manure, soil, and various vegetative waste. Clean shredded wood or bark should not smell like horse manure.
Mulch, soil and vegetation should be a minimum of 6" from wood structure. If it is piled closer, you should do some digging.
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snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net says... :) One Problem is, I didn't think of it but we recently had a major problem :) with carpenter ants. Will this dark mulch laid up against the home attract :) the ants to the house? I know mulch retains moisture, and also know that :) carpenter ants love moisture, so was this mulch a mistake? :) :) :) The mulch won't be so much an issue with carpenter ants but maybe several smaller variety of ants along with different type of insects that live in that sort of environment. Even though mulch will attract some insects over time you still are better off with the mulch in the long run. Just don't let it build up higher than the foundation, six inches below is best.
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I put nugget bark mulch (1 to 2 inch chips) in my yard in Seattle and have found carpenter ants nesting in two spots, both under large flower pots which sit in more or less permanent locations on top of the mulch layer. I don't see them nesting in mulch that is in the open. I prefer the large nuggets to fine grind for several reasons and intend to keep using it in spite of the ant appearances because they're actually easy to deal with when you know the exact location of their nest. However, I never saw ant nests in all the many years I used fine grind bark. I think it's because it compresses to densely for them to maneuver in.
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snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com wrote:

disturbed. Mulch has nothing to do with it here, as pots are on stone.and concrete pavers.
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All have used is cedar mulch or cedar bark much for years and had never had a problem with insects in it. Its about 3'" thick and every few years I'd add a little bit more on top. Bugs hate cedar.
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On Sun, 17 Aug 2003 08:40:40 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com wrote:

I also use bark mulch (3-inch chips). When I got 20 bags from Agway late this Spring, I discovered that about four of them were infested with carpenter ants.
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suggested it was because of the mulch they had placed around the house.
I thought you were never supposed to leave wood around a house so placing mulch seems to be an open invitation for bugs.
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I have 3-year-old cedar mulch around the foundation of the house. Recently, I find two groups of terminates inside the cedar mulch. I think I should remove the 3-year-old cedar mulch, and remove them with "something else". That's the "something else" that I haven't decided.
Anyway, I agree with what you said. I don't think this is a good idea to put wood mulch near house foundation.
Jay Chan
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In article <M3O%a.3133$Nc.2147167
:) suggested it was because of the mulch they had placed around the house. :) :) I thought you were never supposed to leave wood around a house so placing :) mulch seems to be an open invitation for bugs. :) But at some point by not doing anything that may or may not attract different sort of insects sort of leaves the home looking a little drab. I have no problem with people using mulch for example, just don't have it pile above the foundation.
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