Mulch

Page 1 of 2  

Can bark mulch kill or turn fur tree branches brown?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Van Chocstraw wrote:

Bark mulch is too light, imo, to harm a tree unless it is piled very deeply over the root zone and up to the trunk. I don't know particulars of pines except that there are common diseases that can kill them. I'd ask, or take pictures and a sample, to local extension service.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Van Chocstraw wrote:

I would doubt it. Although the most common mistake people make with mulch is to pile it high around the trunk. That makes a perfect place for insects to boar into the bark and that can kill the tree. Mulch should not touch the base of the trunk.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Are people doing the volcano pile high mulch thing everywhere now? Here in NJ it's become the common thing over the last decade or so. I attributed it to nyc folks who don;t know any better and have been migrating here in droves.
Lately I've noticed another factor. In new construciton, I've seen 7 ft trees planted with the huge mulch volcanoes, at least a foot high. Turns out, the trees were planted without much of a hole. Looks like a half-assed way to avoid digging the proper hole. And by the time the tree dies, it isn't there problem anymore.
To answer the OP question, no reason mulch about 3" thick or so should harm any tree, unless it's mulch that was made out of something toxic.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

My reason was so I wouldn't have to mow under the branches which are low to the ground. Keeps the grass and weeds from growing under there.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Van Chocstraw wrote:

Mulch won't hurt unless there is too much as others suggest. I have several evergreens with branches touching ground and there is no need to mulch because nothing will grow there.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
clipped

It is a good idea to mulch around trees to keep from injuring trunk with mowers. Just don't pile it too high or too thick, or, as another mentioned, up against the trunk. Mulch that is too heavy and/or thick can smother roots. Another concern is that, over time, much decomposition can temporarily deprive tree of nutrients....requires N to break down. I suspect that would be more problematic for small trees and mulch, like leaves, that break down more rapidly.
Citrus trees, for one, are very susceptible to fungus disease from having too wet conditions around base of trunk.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:
-snip-

1 foot high? Seems 3 feet is the rule here-- Near Albany, NY. The first time I saw it I thought they were just healing in the plants on newly delivered mulch. The dumbest looking one I've seen had 45 degree slopes and some 3-4ft high pointy evergreens planted on them perpendicular to the slope.

That was my thought--- Some disease or chemical in the mulch. "Bark mulch" covers a whole lot of different materials.
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jim Elbrecht wrote:

Kind of hard to imagine bark mulch containing sufficient chemicals to harm a tree...s'pose anything is possible :o)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 17 Oct 2009 14:02:08 -0400, " snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net"
-snip-

Imagine this. . . Power crew treats right-of-way with herbicide. After everything is dead a clean up crew mulches it up so the brush doesn't create a fire hazard. Homeowner says "Free mulch" and throws a couple pickup loads on his prize rhododendron.
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jim Elbrecht wrote:

Wellllll....you don't treat an area with herbicide and then immediately cut the brush you intend to kill with the herbicide. If herbicide is used, it would break down before new growth would come along. And bark mulch is typically pine bark, waste from mills.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net wrote:

What about the dye they color it with? Around here, all the pre-bagged mulch seems to be red or gray. (Not that I mulch, mind you. Just curious.)
-- aem sends...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
aemeijers wrote:

The only colored mulch I am aware of is shredded cypress...bark? Don't recall ever seeing colored bark. There is always red lava rock, which is hideous.
I like natural colors, and have used shredded cypress. I like it best, but don't like the thought of sacrificing cypress trees. Shredded leaves are great, especially for acid-loving plants. Something that is ideal for permanent plantings is river rock on top of landscape cloth. No trees to sacrifice, no chemicals, allows moisture to reach plants and is a natural product. In some areas around our condo where I put in some delicate plants, I put a potted plant into the ground first, put landscape cloth and rock around it - these are relatively small so that I can just pull the pot to bring them indoors if it freezes here. For larger plants, can still use the pot so's the rock and l.c. aren't disturbed if I want to change plantings.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Yes, I think it's everywhere now.

When I was still in PA, I had seen it since the 80's. Maybe earlier?
Here is a cute little story about humans and nature:
http://www.kairoscambrianagassiz.org/laugh.htm
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

My fur tree branches are always brown, alot of needles normaly go brown this time of year and fall, bark much wont hurt or kill a tree.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
ransley wrote:

Brown is the commonest color for fur, isn't it? <G>
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
jeff_wisnia wrote:

Around her needles are green, not brown normally.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Van Chocstraw wrote:

Did you notice the <G>? He wasn't talking about needles. Not to mention I think when referring to a tree, it's Fir, not fur. Well anyway it used to be before the internet starting to ruin the English language making it worse than it was already.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I think what he was talking about is the fact that at least some pine trees and maybe similar trees have some of their needles turn yellow this time of year and then they shed them and grow new ones. People can mistake that for a tree problem.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Whoosh........
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.