Mower won't start

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On 5/11/2015 9:03 PM, Dean Hoffman wrote:

The gasket in question is shaped like an O ring, but it's square stock, not round stock.
http://www.lawnmowerpartsoutlet.com/assets/images/carbparts/49-841.jpg
The odds of cutting your own is near zero.
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On Tue, 12 May 2015 07:54:47 -0400, Stormin Mormon

often do come out squared though.
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On 5/12/2015 12:27 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Try using E o'ring Mower Gaskets.
E = M G squared.
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Check out the 'bolt' that holds the float bowl on. I am thinking that engine has a hole in the end and also a very small hole on the side. That hole on the side is very small and hard to see, not the great big one near one end.
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On 5/10/2015 8:41 PM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

Got all the tiny holes I could find. Pumped a can of carb cleaner thru it. The gas tank is very clean inside as was the carburetor.
I've rebuilt a dozen auto carbs and motorcycle carbs over the years. Never did find anything wrong with any of them, but they worked after reassembly. Until now.
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I'd take the bolt/jet that hold the bowl on the bottom of carb off and let some gas run out till you are sure there is no fuel delivery problem to that point. Be sure the cap is venting properly. I've been finding a lot of water in mower gas tanks and carbs (including mine). Like others said only 100% gasoline in the small engines. Adjust the valves, it's not that hard to do. You should also be able to keep it running by taking off the air cleaner and choking it a bit with you finger to keep it running until it warms up. These things are like playing amusical instrument. Stay after it.. check the cables and make sure the safety brake isn't dragging. If you want to try it you might try finding a jet/carb bolt with larger jetting or very and I mean very very slightly make the jets a little bit bigger using a welding torch cleaner although that isn't supposed to be done or needed. Best advice I know is be sure to use only 100% gasoline. I once had a weird one, the spark was jumping to ground because of a cracked coil, but it would fire and almost run. Sometimes for whatever reason a good old spark plug works better than a brand new one. Don't give up... just one more pull on the rope and if the rope breaks... well fix that also.
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On Sun, 10 May 2015 17:15:02 -0700 (PDT), bob_villa

emission reasons - leaned further by ethanol mix, and even more if any gum has deposited in the jets.
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On 5/10/2015 6:50 PM, mike wrote:

Used to have to crank the blade backwards to check compression.
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On Mon, 11 May 2015 08:14:16 -0400, Stormin Mormon

it bypasses the compression release.
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I bought a used mower with similar symptoms and it had water in the carburetor bowl. Drained it out and it ran great. Then it started doing it again and I found more water in the bowl, must have come from the tank. This happened a couple more times before all the water seemed to finally be gone.

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On 5/11/2015 9:54 PM, Ashton Crusher wrote:

Too much bother to drain the tank and get new fuel?
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On Tue, 12 May 2015 07:56:16 -0400, Stormin Mormon

I turned it upside down and got out all I could from the tank. Put in new fuel. Somehow there was still water trapped somewhere in the thing and even with new fuel, from the same little tank I use for my regular mower that never has this problem so I'm pretty sure it wasn't water from the new fuel. The nice thing about the mower was that you could undo the fuel bowl with an adjustable wrench and the "nut" also had the "jet" in it and you could blow that out too. I've also found it to get clogged with crap occasionally. I used to have a mower that had a spring loaded drain valve on the bottom of the fuel bowl...I'm sure that would be illegal today.
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On 5/12/2015 2:53 PM, Ashton Crusher wrote:

I've never had much success, upside down draining mower gas tanks. Strange design.
Also seen the spring loaded drain valves. Likely illegal, makes too much sense.
Just think of all the dead baby seals....
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On 5/12/15 3:19 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I never had much success rinsing debris out of my old garden sprayer that way. It would be presumptuous to call the designer an idiot when he probably just didn't. The new tank rinses better.
Draining is the way to go for water in a tank. If there's no stopcock, I use needlenose visegrips. A peanut butter jar will probably be more than enough. When you scoop the peanut butter out, leave a note on the counter reminding you to dump the gas before you put the peanut butter back in.
On the motorcycles I remember, removing float bowls worked very well. In one case, I had only to flip a wire bail. You can examine what's in there and dispose of it as you wish.
In small engines with hole in the bowl, you get gas on your hands. You can't see how much fuel was in it, and you can't check for water or debris.
On my riding mower, when I suspect debris in the bowl, I have to remove the carburetor because I can't get to the nut on the bowl. The nut is probably inaccessible for safety because the carburetor sits over the muffler. It should cool to a safe temperature during the 72 hours it takes me to get the carburetor off.
Cars, other vehicles, and small engines used to have glass bowls to catch water and debris. There are still water traps, but you just have to open the drain because they aren't transparent.

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On 5/12/15 6:40 PM, J Burns wrote:

I meant "just didn't care." Please don't presume I just didn't care. I'm an idiot.
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mike wrote:

Gas air spark compression timing
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