Moving kitchen cabinets

I think I know the answer to this but until you ask it, you never know. I want to remodel my kitchen and use the existing kitchen cabinets in a basement remodel. Is there anything I should look out for in doing such?
Thoughts, as always, are appreciated.
--
Edee Em
I know the truth is out there, but I like to stay in....
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: I think I know the answer to this but until you ask it, you never know. I : want to remodel my kitchen and use the existing kitchen cabinets in a : basement remodel. Is there anything I should look out for in doing such? : : Thoughts, as always, are appreciated. : : -- : Edee Em : I know the truth is out there, but I like to stay in.... : :
Be very careful removing them.... Remove the doors first... Have someone with you to help support the wall cabinets... Hopefully, yours will be attached using screws... Mine weren't. I was able to only salvage 50% of the old cabinets.
Oh yeah, empty them first <Grin>
Rick
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wrote:

Depends on how they were built and installed.
Today, cabinets are boxes screwed to the studs behind the wall. Generally, four screws (two top, two bottom). Often these are hidden by small plastic "buttons" -- just pop the button off and voila, there's the screw. Sometimes they are hidden by fillers -- probe gentle with an awl or the point of a utility knife -- scoop out the filler and vioila --
Cabinets are also joined to each other ... by screws through the face frame -- again, look around till you find them.
If yours were built that way ...put some support under the uppers ... and pop them out.
In older homes, cabinets were sometimes built right on the wall. These are dificult to get off -- most often, we end up removing them gently with an axe and a reciprocating saw. Nothing except the doors are salvageable.
For the lowers --- your countertop should be screwed down from underneath with one inch screws .. should be easily salvageable if you want it. Again .. there are always some that were installed with no thought as to how they would be taken off --- screwed from the top and laminated over --- various glues -- all kinds of nutty things.
Hope yours were done by a pro.
Ken
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I removed mine from a 1969 home recently. They were built in place, and installed with (thankfully) double headed 8 penny nails. I remove all of the upper cabinets over the peninsula in one piece, 10 feet. I ended up with 7 separated pieces in all. Some damage occurred. Most of the cabinets when into the garage and I sprayed them white. Have a few friends over for the demo party. You may need the help.
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I wasn't going to reply, however, after reading the reply below I thought this might be interesting. My original cabinets were put in the house when it was built in 1972. I removed them about 12 years ago and reused them in the basement. There were no nails. All upper cabinets were screwed into the wall studs with wood screws. The stiles (sp?) were "pulled" together with long flat headed wood screws. Bottom cabinets were again screwed to wall studs with wood screws. Again, the stiles were pulled together with long flat headed wood screws. Old laminate tops were screwed in from underneath using wood screws through the 45 degree corner braces .... you have to remove drawers to get to the screws. This made a nice addition to the laundry area in the basement.
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