Mouse traps

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bob haller wrote:

Then the cats will be well fed .
--
Snag



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bob haller wrote:

How many repeat offenders did you have? Sounds like mouse heaven to me. Eat the bait in the live trap, get a trip outside, rinse and repeat.
Fish & Game plays the same game culvert trapping problem bears, At least they tranq the bear so he wakes up with a hangover and splitting headache that slows him down on the return to his favorite bird feeder.
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On 6/29/2014 12:27 AM, rbowman wrote:

And we can mention the TX / Mexico border.
--
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Christopher A. Young
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On 6/29/2014 6:03 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Huge mouse traps would solve that problem ;)
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bob haller wrote:

What's a little hantavirus amongst friends. My first response is eviction. If they don't stay evicted, I escalate.
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On 6/29/2014 12:31 AM, rbowman wrote:

Hantavirus isn't a big problem in the U.S. But leptospirosis is.
It's not the mice, but their urine, that carries it.
So it's not enough to trap the mice. Afterwards, clean the areas they had infested.
--
Steven L.


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That reminds me of the time I inadvertently caught a mouse. Some decades ago, when I still believed in the vilification of saturated fat, I would brown my ground beef and pour the fat into a can. I seem to remember something about the stove top was lower than the counter. Whatever, somehow the mouse got into a can half filled with fat. It was swimming around and couldn't get out. I put the can into a few layers of plastic bags and out with the garbage it went.
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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Except that they keep coming back.

Hey, if you don't mind having mice chewing holes in things in your kitchen, and pissing all over your house, that's your business. Just don't invite me over for lunch, OK?
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Not if you seal up the holes they're entering through.
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Steven L. wrote:

It's around.
http://www.cdc.gov/hantavirus/surveillance/state-of-exposure.html http://unews.utah.edu/old/p/122308-1.html
A couple of people in Utah died in 2012 and there was a confirmed case in Kane County, UT this spring. I'm not much of a hypochondriac but when I was cleaning out a shed that a pack rat had taken up residence in I had a few thoughts about a HazMat suit.
Leptospirosis at about 100 cases a year is a marginally larger problem than hantovirus at 25-30. Considering 50% of the leptospirosis cases are in Hawaii and the rest are mainly in the northeast, hantavirus is of more interest to me.
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Don Wiss wrote:

That's a variant on the trash container theme; fill it with a few inches of water and let the mouse drown. I consider that cruel and unusual compared to SNAP, you're dead. As a matter of interest, a motivated mouse can jump a little more than halfway up the standard 13 gallon kitchen trash can.
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On 6/29/2014 3:19 PM, rbowman wrote:

Reminds me of a couple of experiences:
SNAP, you're dead is not necessarily so. Cold night I heard a snap in the furnace room and rather than throw the mouse out the door, I opted to flush him. He revived in the toilet bowl and tried to get out but got flushed anyway. It's more like, snap and suffocate.
Glue traps work but a mouse may gnaw off a leg trying to escape. I've seen it happen.
Caught one in a glue trap at friends hunting camp and watching him struggle tossed him and the trap into the firebox. Watching him burn still burns in my mind after many years.
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On 28 Jun 2014 16:13:57 GMT, KenK wrote:

feral cats?
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I didn't know that! I'll try it! All uncanned food now in plastic storage containers; shouldn't take much to get them to move out.
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---

I feed several. Not sure I'd want one in the house though. Decidedly not very good company. Probably wouldn't use the litter pan. Cat door and let them freely come in and out? I dunno. Doesn't sound like a very good isea.
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100 pound bags are awfully heavy. I was buying this in 50 pound bags. I stored them inside only one season. They brought me moths. I then moved to storing them outside. I can put two of them inside a metal garbage can. I have a spring that goes through the lid handle and connects to each side handle.
I briefly tried a plastic garbage can. The squirrels tried to chew through it.
Outside is also very convenient to the bird feeder.
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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I researched the moth balls on Google earlier. There seems to be a wide difference in opinion on whether they work on mice. I bought a package of moth balls and will try them anyway. AFAIK I have all the mouse-openable food packages now stored in fairly thick plastic lidded large containers. Shouldn't take much to encourage them to look for another home.
--
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Peppermint oil seems to be the current thinking.
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KenK wrote:

The kittens we're supposed to be getting are semi-wild/feral . The woman <wife's co-worker> is attempting to "socialize" them a bit , I neither want nor need feral cats here . Both are supposed to be females <we'll neuter if she doesn't> , they'll be encouraged to come inside whenever they want thru the dog door . Don't need a tomcat spraying in the house ... We like cats , we like dogs . We've had a lot of both over the years , and we've found that cats can indeed be good company . Not as overtly loving as dogs , but they let you know .
--
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On 6/28/2014 9:13 AM, KenK wrote:

My favorite is a five gallon bucket, with a soda can strung on a piece of baling wire. Remove the tab so you have the small hole, drilling preferred. Drill a small hole dead center in the bottom of the can. String it on baling wire. Tie this across the mouth of a five gallon bucket. Bend a couple of kinks in the wire to keep the can centered. Slather the can with peanut butter. Place a ramp of some type up to the lip of the bucket, or sit it close to something where the rodents can get up to the lip, and attempt to go out on the wire. Put six inches of water in the bucket. Check daily, as the get putrid dead smelly very quickly. Safe for pets, no poisons. Keep away from toddlers. Easy, cheap, and they work. And you can have two or four or ten, how ever many you need.
For a regular trap, smear some peanut butter UNDER the trip pad, and they will try to get under there. Also mount the trap in the vertical, where the rodent has to reach up for the food. First thing they do is grab the trip with their hands.
HTH.
Steve
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