mounting tile vertically outside


I have three Sonotubed rounds that are about 24" high, 30" diameter. They are exterior, and get snow and rain and direct sun. I would like to cover this now bare concrete. Ideally, I'd like to tile them using small tile, say 2" square, or smaller, or scraps, or odd rectangulars, and use some Mexican and unique 4x4 and 6x6 tiles we have.
What type of mortar/grout/adhesive should I use so that they do not pop off with freeze thaw cycles? Or should I just do the horizontal tops with tile, and then do a colored grout on the vertical round sides?
I want to dress these up, but don't want to be forever patching and reattaching. Is this possible, or should I just use colored mortar or grout on the round vertical sides, and then use a few tiles on the top to dress them up?
TIA
Steve
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On Fri, 1 Jan 2010 12:55:07 -0800, "Steve B"

"Flex" mortar.
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wrote:

I'll check it out. That's not like curved gun barrels, is it?
Steve
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Steve B wrote:

The usual - thinset.
It freezes very seldom where I live but I see no reason why frequent freezing/thawing should affect adherance of the tiles. Bricks are fastened to lots of things, ever see a pile of bricks at the bottom of a wall after a freeze?
--

dadiOH
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dadiOH wrote:

Uh, unless this is that faux brick stuff attached to a vertical mudbed with chicken wire in it, bricks aren't really attached to the wall- they are attached to each other, with an air space behind. Only thing tying the brick to the wall is those metal straps every few courses vertically, and every few feet horizontally. OP's concern is valid. Yes, I have seen outdoor decorative tile pop off when water gets behind it and freezes. I'd be inclined to go with a mastic that stays flexible, and then grout. Or better yet, stop by local pro masonry supply house, and ask them what the real guys use for that application, and buy what they recommend. They should know what works in that area.
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Steve, the failure of most exterior tile and stone work has to do with water getting into the materials. It is essential to use tile or stone that is rated for exterior work, won't absorb water and installing in such a manner as to shed water well (make sure the tops of your column stubs have slope). Most stone requires a sealer of some type to keep water out.
For ease of care, I think I would consider a Dryvit type EIFS finish coat on the stubs. Quite tough, fairly easy to install, choice of colors, etc.
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