Mounting a Small Tire on Wheel

Page 2 of 2  
On Mon, 20 Jun 2011 09:32:21 -0700 (PDT), gcotterl

Yes. On a bicylce too. Enough that it straightens but doesn't inflate. Not so much that it interferes

Yes. Make an effort to work the tire in evenly on each side of the valve, to keep the valve pointing straight to the center. This is 1000 times more important on a bicycle than on a wagon.

It's amazing how getting it on can be harder than getting it off.
And it may be that it's harder for smaller wheels, I don't know, but if there is stretching involved, maybe there is less stretching.
Start at the valve and use your thumbs to push the tire inside the rim, alternating from side to side and working away from the valve. At the end, screwdrivers are too sharp, you may need s bicycle-size tire-iron, but since you'll never do this again, use the handle of a spoon, like a cheap stainless steel soup spoon, not with a handle that is pointed at all but a wide rounded handle or even one with a wide rectangular end if it has rounded corners and edges. To further protect the tire, don't push the spoon handle more than a quarter or half inch past the end of the metal rim, under the tire. Then lift the spoon and you will likely not be pinching the tube. I guess you should uninflate the tube as much as possible before doing this, but with bicycle tires, I don't.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

It's that last little bit that's hard. But with experience you learn how to handle it.

I've never done a tire that small; have done plenty of bicycle tires; though.
OP may be able to push the seated portion down onto the rim below the bead. This would push the unseated portion further out from the rim, giving him a bit more wiggle room to lever the last bit over the rim.
But then he'd have to re-center the tire on the rim before inflating it to make sure it spins true. I can't see it being that difficult.
--
Tegger

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

It's a Radio-Flyer wagon. If it bumps he can tell them that's the way it is on dusty roads when you're a cowboy.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

split rims. Makes getting tube type tyres on and off a BREEZE
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

a non-driven wheel with no brakes you are unlikey to tear the valve-stem out of the tube when the tire slides around the rim. RuGlyde tire mounting lubricant is ethelene Glycol - vegetable based (non phosphate) soap works reasonably well - (phosphates in most dish detergents contribute to corrosion of aluminum wheels.)
Malco Tire Lube is a mixture, apparently, of Isopropyl Alcohol- - Alkyl Olephin Sulphate, (a surfactant) and Polyethelene Oxide. ( a lubricant)
Full strength Ethelene Glycol antifreeze works well in a pinch - and isn'f FAR off from the commercial stuff.
On driven or braking wheels you want something that goes on slick, and dries with some "bite" to it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.