Mounting a Small Tire on Wheel

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I'm trying to replace the inner tube in the tire of a "Radio Flyer" child's wagon.
I've removed the wheel from the wagon, worked the tire off one side of the rim and removed the old inner tube.
The new inner tube is twisting when I work it into the tire. Should I partially inflate the new inner tube first?
Do I put the valve stem through the hole in the rim before working the rest of the inner tube into the tire?
Once I get the inner tube into the tire, how do I get the tire back onto the rim?
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On Mon, 20 Jun 2011 09:32:21 -0700, gcotterl wrote:

You put the valve stem in the hole, stuff the tube into the tire, put the tire back on the rim, remove the valve stem and inflate and deflate the tube a couple times so it straightens its self out inside the tire, replace the valve stem and inflate to recommended pressure.
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Why would one "put the valve stem in the hole", then "remove the valve stem" and then "replace the valve stem"? Don't you mean the valve stem cap?
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Yeah - I was wondering about that too.
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gcotterl wrote:
...

...
Generally for passenger tires and larger, tire shops will leave the stem out for initial (on tubeless) bead setting or for tube to fill and balloon the tube.
Makes for much faster air flow which is important for setting the bead and as suggested, allows to deflate the tube again quickly after initial inflation so it can adjust itself in the space.
Since it's now out, clearly it'll need to be reinstalled after final inflation... :)
For such a small tire the inflation speed isn't such a problem but the idea to help adjust the tube is sound...
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I think this is the classic case of what a term means. Instead of valve stem, maybe valve core should have been used.
My way of thinking , the valve stem is the whole tube sticking out of the side of the inertube and the valve core is the part that screws out of the valve stem. Then the valve cap is the part that is screwed over the top of the valve stem to keep the dirt and such out of the valve.
The valve core is sometimes removed from the valve stem to air will flow in faster, or so that you do not have to hold the center part in when letting all the air out.
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On Mon, 20 Jun 2011 14:50:12 -0400, "Ralph Mowery"

Correct terminology
. On tubeless tires it is often virtually impossible to set the bead without removing the valve core because the air gets out between the bead and the rim faster than you can put it in through the core.
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wrote:

Thanks. I _knew_ "stem" was incorrect but due to a senior moment I couldn't come up witht the correct term.
Harry K
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You're saying "valve stem" when (I think) you mean "valve core"
--
Better to be stuck up in a tree than tied to one.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar.org
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On Mon, 20 Jun 2011 19:48:50 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

I virtually NEVER use a knife. Just grab the stem with a pliers, or the tool used to install the stem, and give it a yank.. Been doing it that way for 45 years.

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On Mon, 20 Jun 2011 10:08:24 -0700, gcotterl wrote:

If you knew what your were doing it would be simple.
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On Mon, 20 Jun 2011 16:46:39 +0000, Dbdblocker wrote:

Does this straighten it out for you?
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On Mon, 20 Jun 2011 09:32:21 -0700 (PDT), gcotterl

No. A little twisting won't hurt, as long as you don't do a 180 on it.

Yes.
Inch by inch. pushing it past the rim with your thumbs. If you end up using a flat screwdriver, just put very the tip on the rim so you don't pinch the new tube and put a hole in it.
--Vic
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wrote:

I like to use a little waterless hand cleaner (GoJo) on the rim and tire as a lubricant to help get the tir back on the rim.. Soapy water works pretty good too. HAving a rubber faced sledge hammer is very helpful too.
Jimmie
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On Wed, 22 Jun 2011 09:34:44 -0700 (PDT), JIMMIE

Sounds good. I have containers of GoJo all over the place. Silicone spray might work too. Tell the truth last time I changed tubed tires was a loooong time ago.
--Vic
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On Fri, 24 Jun 2011 22:21:52 -0500, Vic Smith

Silicone spray is OK for non-driven or non braked wheels - or tubeless tires - but you do NOT want the tire slippong on the rim with a tube type tire. Tears the valve stems out of the tubes in a hurry.
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You can inflate it partially once it's in the tire, but inflate only enough to get it to straighten out, and then let some air out before seating the tire's bead.

Yes.
Go to a bicycle shop and get a set of tire-changing spoons. They hinge together like a set of pliers and come apart for use. Very inexpensive.
One spoon is used to hold the bead in place against the rim while the other spoon is used to lever the bead over the rim, working in a circle. Make certain you do not pinch the new tube between bead and rim!
--
Tegger

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I vote the sudsy water suggestion (Oren!) is tops. I would concentrate the soap, liquid dish soap preferrably, so that it is more creamy than sudsy water. Smear the whole tube, the inside of the tire and rim. Works dandily on small wheel barrow tires, also.
Addendum: In trying to reinstall a large 250 lb pillar under a house corner, after releveling the house, we 1) prepped/compacted the soil, smooth, where the pillar was to go. 2) laid a large plastic trash bag on the outside edge and up under the house corner. 3) smeared Dawn all over the trash bag, 4) placed another trash bag over the first. 5) placed the pillar on the top trash bag. 6) shoved the pillar right in place. We had 1/8" clearance for negotiating that pillar. We would have never wriggled that large pillar into place, with just that much wriggle room, if we wouldn't have used the trashbag-dishsoap method.
Sonny
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On Mon, 20 Jun 2011 13:10:26 -0700, Sonny wrote:

Yeah, I've always used Dawn or equivalent for that, and it seems to work well.

Interesting you mention that. There was a video on youtube of a guy (a motorbike restorer, if I remember right) who uses garbage bags placed over the rim to assist in getting the tire on. Removing all of the bag afterwards looked to be quite the struggle, though, so overall I'm not sure it would save any time - but it was interesting to see an alternative method.
cheers
Jules
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On Jun 20, 1:41pm, Jules Richardson


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P6sH8WRl6yI

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