moulding vs. glazing? ? ?

I have a large sunporch enclosed by glass -- a total of around 200 windowpanes.
These are in dire need of reglazing, which is a huge job. I've experimented a bit, and just can't seem to get the hang of making a good glaze -- the surface is always lumpy and uneven.
I was wondering if quarter-inch wood moulding might not be a good alternative to glazing? It's exterior, but I could prime and double-coat the moulding.
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Hi, If the exterior bar of the muntins are 3/16" or less, I doubt you will be able to nail the molding on because of the small section of wood available; you can't nail to the glass. Some enclosures were designed for strips/molding, and these have at least 3/8" of wood in the external portion. The molding I've seen for this has a sloped top side, ending in a small bead. It should be made of a good exterior wood, like white pine or mahogany. It would be a good idea to bed the glass in putty, and at least prime the glass rabbet and the strips first. then when they are all cut to size, prime the miters and set the molding. The glass side of the molding should not have any drips or rough grain so that it can be pressed tight to the glass, and the top coat of paint will provide the water seal so that water is not trapped. Doing an exterior glass molding job is hella lot more work than putty, but it has a certain look about it. You should condition your glazing putty by warming it and kneading until smooth. Casey

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Thanks Casey -- I was thinking of anchoring the moulding with a small amount of putty or DAP silicone caulk rather than attempting to tack the moulding.
I'm going to try again to get a decent job with my glazing before I go to the extreme of moulding.
-- Ray

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This was standard in England some time ago. It survives English winter temperatures OK.
My Canadian painter friend uses caulk (via caulking gun) for windows.
-- Don Phillipson Carlsbad Springs (Ottawa, Canada)
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Ray Jenkins wrote:

When I reglazed some old windows, the secret was in having a smoothe edge to run the putty knife along. If the wood has paint chips making the edge irregular, either hit the edge with sandpaper or hold a metal straight-edge on it to provide a smoothe run. Practice, practice, practice :o) I did only about 10 windows, and had to sacrifice the glass from a couple, rather than risk running my hand through them trying to pry out the old, hard putty and paint. Easier, sometimes, to bust out the glass - can use Contact paper stuck on it, then hit it with a hammer :o) Sand and prime.
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A heat gun softens the old putty so it easily scrapes out. Shield the glass with a chunk of sheet metal of a 12" wallboard taping knife.
Bob
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work a little better.
i trashed my bay windows and put in new vinyl windows. the task of reglazing and then painting 100 12x12 windows was too much for me to cope with.
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I hadn't heard of the glazing that comes in a caulking gun. Do you mean regular caulking, like DAP?

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Having read your reply that you were going to try again, follow these tips:
Buy your Dap 33 from someone who sells a lot of it (paint store). Buy a "bent putty knife" at the same store. Remove the old glazing and apply a generous coat of boiled linseed oil to the sash at least 2 hours before you want to glaze. Remove the glaze from the can and work a tennis ball sized hunk to mix the oils and warm the glaze.
I can offer a few more tips if you want them.
--
Colbyt
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Thanks Colbyt -- I'd welcome any further info you may have.
I wonder if carefully heating the entire can of DAP 33 in the oven -- say, to around 100 degrees -- wouldn't work.

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Ray Jenkins wrote:

Microwave - 1-1/2 minutes on high.
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fresh you won't have any problems and if it is old you may as well throw it away. You might run the sink full of hot water and sit the sealed can in it for 30 minutes.
There really is a technique to doing this. Assuming you are right handed. You get a ball of softened putty in your left hand and feed it through the tips of first two fingers and thumb while pressing it into place the entire length of one side of the sash. At this point you will have about twice as much putty in place as you are going to finish with. Now you hold the bent putty knife tightly against the window and sash (the handle parallel to the draw stroke you are going to make) and press with your left hand, draw the knife the entire length of the sash in one clean stoke. Salvage the cut away putty and return it to the ball. Now do the other 3 sides. Then form your corners. Then do the final smooth. And remember that it will look a lot smoother when you put a coat of paint on it. And when was the last time you ever stared so intently at anyone's window glazing? This technique and a little practice will allow you to do 16 pane window in about 45 minutes. The pro's are faster.
BTW, If the old stuff is stuck so tightly that I have to risk breaking something to pry it out, I don't. I just treat with the boiled linseed oil and apply new around the old till it all looks smooth. Others will say the primer is as good as boiled linseed oil. I have not found that to be true in my personal experience. Of course I am deal with really old windows, sometime the wood has softened a bit.
Wait at least a month, or until a skin forms on the DAP before you paint.
If all this sounds like too much you could always do the removal and the sealing and hire a pro to apply the glazing. Around here the glass companies will do it by the hour. It was by paying one and watching that I learned how to do it.
--
Colbyt
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