Motor-oil on concrete? ? ?

My snow-blower leaked a rather large puddle of motor-oil on our basement concrete floor.
What's the best way to get the stain out?
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Ray wrote:

Start with getting as much oil out as possible. I suggest starting with kitty littler and naphtha. pour on the naphtha and then cover it with the kitty letter. Keep it damp for some time and then add more kitty litter to dry it up. Clean up the kitty litter and repeat if necessary as long as it helps. Next try TSP if available in your area, if not try one of the specialty products made for cleaning oil and other stains off concrete.
Good Luck
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Joseph Meehan

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I'd be afraid to pour naphtha on the floor. The fumes are highly volatile and could cause a fire rather quickly if they hit a pilot light on a heater. Just like pouring gasoline right on the floor. When we were kids, my brother set our house on fire pouring gas in the basement. Use an oil absorbent first. Let it sit for a few days, the clean with a strong detergent or TSP.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

You are right, I should have included cautions. Naphtha is less dangerous than many of the alternatives, but it is still dangerous. I do use it, but if I had an open flame anywhere in the garage or connected area, I would be sure to eliminate that flame first.
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Joseph Meehan

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Joseph Meehan wrote:

Eeek!
Wouldn't naptha (gasoline, etc.), dissolve the oil and let it sink further into the concrete?
Kitty litter for quite a while is good. I think I'd then try power washing with detergent.
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Spray the oil spot with brake parts cleaner and wipe up with a rag...
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Put a handful of dry concrete on the stain, leave it for a day and sweep it up. Works great.

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paint over it. that way the next spill will come up easy.
randy

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I just put sawdust on it, walk on it and occasionally sweep it up and put fresh sawdust down. If you want to get rid of the residual stain after that, use a specialty product.
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Liquid Tide, strong brush, and elbow grease.
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Why worry about it? Just park the snow blower over the spot and fuhgedahboutit.....
;-]
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On Sun, 23 Jan 2005 19:40:56 GMT, "Ray"

Pour cat litter or oil dry on it. Leave it, walk on the area as often as you can; sweep after a few weeks.
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snipped-for-privacy@verizonDELETHIS.net says...

Laquer thinner works exceptionally well in the driveway. I'd be reluctant to use it indoors, though.
-Mike
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Our paper reported a couple of years ago a man was seriously burned when the vapors from lacquer thinner exploded when they reached the pilot of the stove in the kitchen he was cleaning. I use it in the garage where the water heater is on a stand above the floor where vapors collect. The garage doors are also open for ventilation.
On Mon, 24 Jan 2005 21:13:37 -0600, Mike Hartigan

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Bob Bowles wrote:

...
That's still too spooky for me...I'd keep any <highly> volatile liquid away from the open flame...maybe if there were an exhausting fan as well as the open door...just why take a chance? It'll only go boom once.
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The Number One answer is: find a quart of DC-13 from Klean-Strip (Driveway and Concrete cleaner) Yardbirds out in Calif has it, my local HD used to carry it....
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On Sun, 23 Jan 2005 19:40:56 GMT, "Ray"

Id start with liquid dishwasher soap, It may not be 100% but it is safe and can sometimes work wonders on oil.
*-------------------------------* NEVER FORGET!!! http://cf1.newsday.infi.net/911/victimsearchframe.cfm?id !05
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