Most heat resistant counter top?

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I like white Corian counters to work on. Corian doesn't win the heat resistance award. The cabinet box that will be alongside the range is 12-1/4" wide. I could give that section a stone countertop, and somehow have it meet nicely with the Corian. That box could have a lower height to match the surface with the 1/2" thick Corian.
It seems that granite is the most heat resistant. Or is there some rare stone or other material known for its heat resistance? I would think that the thicker the more resistant. Are there thicker countertop thickness options?
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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Don Wiss wrote:

Stainless steel?
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Could be. You wouldn't see the wood underneath being scorched. As long as it doesn't get odoriferous when the wood heats up. Too bad I can't put a layer of asbestos under the stainless. Or is there something else that goes in between?
Having Corian and stainless steel join together...
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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Don Wiss wrote:

Stainless usually doesn't have a backer. You could back it with regular cement board if you wanted.

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wrote:

underneath them except air.. And they are EXTREMELY heat resistant..
If you need to put it over wood, put some ceramic heat blanket like used on aircraft firewalls - One brand is Fiberfax.- between the wood and the stainless.
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On Wed, 01 May 2013 22:55:55 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

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"Don Wiss" wrote in message wrote:

Could be. You wouldn't see the wood underneath being scorched. As long as it doesn't get odoriferous when the wood heats up. Too bad I can't put a layer of asbestos under the stainless. Or is there something else that goes in between?
Having Corian and stainless steel join together...
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
Don... Air space between the steel and the cabinet. Have the steel folded around the 4 sides with a flange folded in. Screw in place by going up from inside the cabinet and into the flanges..WW
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Maybe the answer is tile? Porcelain or ceramic?
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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Don Wiss wrote:

Grout lines - bad, a pain to clean and seal, tile isn't generally flat so stuff doesn't always sit on them well, and it's also very much out of style for kitchen counters.

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On this page the unglazed porcelain tile comes in 14" squares: http://www.crossvilleinc.com/contract/products/porcelain_stone/empire
That countertop would be 28" x 12-1/4", so only a single grout line. And only one place for unevenness.
I don't care what is in style. If I did, I wouldn't be installing Designer White Corian.
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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Silestone (engineered quartz) is very heat-resistant.
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wrote:

Trivet? Just lay a hunk of tile or stone on top of the Corian, if you like it better than all stone. SWMBO would never have anything other than granite, or perhaps quartz, again. Corian for the bathroom, maybe, but not the kitchen.
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Stainless steel is probably the most practical counter top. Virtually all commercial kitchens use stainless steel food preparation surfaces.
Granite is an igneous rock, and as such is extremely heat resistant.
Everyone wants a ceramic tile counter top until they have one. The problem is that dirt collects in the grout lines, and so they're harder to keep clean than any counter top that offers a continuous smooth flat surface.
Probably the most durable and attractive counter top would be granite.
Probably the most practical counter top would be stainless steel.
--
nestork


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On Thu, 2 May 2013 03:15:40 +0200, nestork

I'd want to see a stainless counter that was 10 years old. For deocratoin and surfaces that don't get used, it's great, but wouldn't it get beat up. in use. The bottom of my sink doesn't look so good, afaicr.
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wrote:

Not necessarilly pretty, but very durable.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I've seen many decades old stainless commercial kitchen counters and they all look "pretty" to me. Perhaps for a brief period as the factory graining of the SS gives way to the random graining caused by actual use it might look not so good, but it looks nice and even after that. Go over the SS with a RO sander before installation to get the random pattern established and eliminate that step.
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wrote:

quite as durable though.
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wrote:

There are stainless cleaners that will keep a stainless sink looking new.
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wrote:

Here is mine
http://gfretwell.com/ftp/counter%20top.jpg
If I was willing to do more than wipe the back splash with a sponge, it would be better looking. This is just what it was 10 minutes ago when I took the picture without doing anything
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On Thu, 02 May 2013 01:58:45 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Welll, it looks pretty good. It certainly doesn't look ugly (although its the bottom of the sink that gets the hitting and scraping), but to go back a step, I was using a sink because that's the only stainless steel I have. For a counter, I can't see why granite isn't better. It's surface doesn't show wipe marks unless the light is just right.
Can one set a hot pot, straight from the oven or stove, on granite without a hotpad or trivet? I thought one could, because as someone sort of pointed out, it was a lot hotter than that when igneous rock was made. **Although I'd probably be afraid to, or afraid I'd get in the habit of putting hot stuff straight on the counter and do it where someone only had formica.
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