most economical (gasoline)

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Which is the most economical? to use additive for gasoline for small engines to take care of standard gasoline with alcohol added or to buy premium fuels with no alcohol added?
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For the dollar a year difference, I go with the premium ethanol free. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
Which is the most economical? to use additive for gasoline for small engines to take care of standard gasoline with alcohol added or to buy premium fuels with no alcohol added?
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On 5/21/2013 7:47 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Not sure all premium is ethanol free. Probably depends on area you live in.
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e in.
I['m not even sure any premium is ethanol free. None of it here in the nj/nyc area is. You can't find any gas that is ethanol free. But if I had the choice, for small engines, no question I'd buy the alcohol free. There are countless reports of the problems alcohol causes, so why buy gas with alchohol, then pay for an additive that *might* help fix it?
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Try here: http://pure-gas.org/index.jsp?stateprov=NY
Some stations near me "say" their premium is ethanol free. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
I['m not even sure any premium is ethanol free. None of it here in the nj/nyc area is. You can't find any gas that is ethanol free. But if I had the choice, for small engines, no question I'd buy the alcohol free. There are countless reports of the problems alcohol causes, so why buy gas with alchohol, then pay for an additive that *might* help fix it?
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On May 21, 12:39 pm, "Stormin Mormon"

NJ is not even on the list. For NY, nothing I see anywhere near the nyc area. It's all way upstate.
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Well, that otherwise good idea isn't doing much good. Sorry about that.
. Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
wrote:

NJ is not even on the list. For NY, nothing I see anywhere near the nyc area. It's all way upstate.
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On 5/21/2013 12:19 PM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I tried to Google it up but did not get a good answer. One site had a US map with fuel requirements of the various states and regions. It's one hell of a mess that causes price increases and fuel shortages throughout the country, e.g. a refinery goes down in California and they cannot bring in gas from out of state as it does not meet their requirements. Pure insanity.
I had trouble with alcohol containing gas bringing down my snow thrower a couple of years ago when I left stabilized gas in it over the summer. Because ethanol in gas changes its solvent properties engines with seals not made for such gas may have seals and the like attacked. I don't see how you can add anything to the gas to change this problem. In my case, I believe shop replaced seals that caused the problem.
I did not notice til much later that snow thrower manual said not to use gas with ethanol in it.
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On 5/21/2013 5:08 AM, Frank Thompson wrote:

What's the big deal about not using gas with alcohol added? I have been using it for years in my mowers, tillers, etc. without any problems.
Don
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Yep.
Harry K
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Do a bit of googling and you'll find plenty of problems. Alcohol attracts water and that in turn leads to corrosion of carb parts, gunking them up, etc.
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On Tue, 21 May 2013 09:20:19 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

The problems with E-10 are mostly involved with storing it. Buy it, burn it and buy more. You will be fine. If you are storing a boat, power tool or whatever, run it dry and store it dry. This is months, not years. The biggest reason this seems to pick on boats and small engines is that they are stored more than they are used, usually full of gas.
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On 5/21/2013 12:39 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Page I was looking at, lot of info:
http://www.exxon.com/USA-English/GFM/fuels_quality_gas_faq.aspx
They even recommend draining your gas tank if not used for a month and good storage up to 6 months.
Hell, I'm using some 2 cycle mix that must be 5 years old and still good :)
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On Tue, 21 May 2013 14:37:29 -0400, Frank

That will depend on your definition of "good" - and what you started with. If you started with AvGas, quite possibly actually "good" or if you stored it in a sealed full can.
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On 5/21/2013 4:53 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

It's in a 2 gallon can about 1/3 full and had Sta-Bil added. Left over from when I had a 2 cycle mower but now its 4 cycle but this gas still runs my string trimmer. Gas looked clear before I tried it in the string trimmer.
My 4 cycle Honda mower started first time this year with gas left in the tank from last summer. Simple little shut off valve, probably cost Honda an extra 25 cents allows engine to be run dry without emptying the tank.
If my snow thrower had a fuel shut off valve, it might have saved expense of shop fixing damage caused by leaving gas with ethanol in it.
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Some older units, the alcohol damages seals, gaskets, etc. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
What's the big deal about not using gas with alcohol added? I have been using it for years in my mowers, tillers, etc. without any problems.
Don
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On Tue, 21 May 2013 03:08:04 -0700, Frank Thompson wrote:

I question why the word *premium*.
I presume you know what "premium" means, which is merely gas that has a lower tendency to knock under a given compression ratio (and heat).
Premium is *not better* than "regular" gasoline, despite advertising to the contrary (e.g., classic detergent FUD).
Neither "premium" nor "regular" nor anything in between is better than the other. The octane rating just means the gas reacts differently to a given compression ratio (and other related detonation factors such as heat).
Given whatever the compression ratio in my lawn equipment is, I get along just fine with 87 AKI California gasoline.
Why the desire to use 92 AKI fuels in your lawn equipment? Is your lawn equipment running at a high compression ratio?
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The issue is not the octane rating. The issue is that he claims he has high octane gas available which doesn't contain alcohol. Alcohol is a real potential problem for small engines. If I could buy gas for use in small engines that had no alcohol, I would. But at least here, nyc/nj area, it's not available.
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On Sat, 25 May 2013 10:07:09 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

OK. Makes sense. Thanks for clarifying.
I didn't initially get that from his question though, so I missed the subtleties involved in the question.
His original question was (cleaned up): Which is the most economical: (a) to use an additive for gasoline for small engines (b) to use standard gasoline with alcohol added (c) or to use premium fuels with no alcohol added
Out here, as elsewhere, there is no option for no alcohol, so the distinction between higher and lower AKI indexes is meaningless (from that perspective).
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On Sat, 25 May 2013 10:07:09 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

He may make the claim but it makes no sense. AFAIK one effect of adding alcohol to gas is to raise it's octane value. So it seems far more likely to me that if there was going to be a gas without alcohol in it, it would be the regular, not the premium.
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