Most common asphalt shingle nail size


Getting ready to stock up for summer projects at Menards 17% sale. Some roofing planned, single shingles over 1/2" plywood and OSB. Saw some commercial projects lately with a lot of the nail length hanging down below the OSB. Seems to me the extra length is wasted, hence the question about optimum length. Would 1 1/2" be best for a decent quality shingle and 30 lb. felt?
Joe
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As long as the nail is long enough to penetrate all the way through the plywood or osb you should be in good shape.
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On Feb 4, 12:45 pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

some shingle wrappers state that the nail mush penetrate the sheathing by 1/8". I most commonly see roofers using 1 1/4" nails.
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On 4 Feb 2007 10:45:33 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

The shingle installation instructions should specify a minimum penetration.
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1 1/2" should be fine. If you did the math, 1" may work but nail length has more to do with the nailer than the what you are nailing.
Anything less than 1 1/4" is a pain to nail and the job would probably take longer. So for pros, the few pennies saved on nails is wasted on labor(most pros would use a gun, but some claim hand nailing is better).
As other have said as long as the nail sticks out a certain amount (I don't know the code) its ok. If you think about nailing vinyl siding on 1/2" OSB, a 3/4" nail should work but would cause allot of smashed fingers.

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