Mortar is the natural enemy of pipes

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In upgrading an outside faucet, I twisted the pipe holding the faucet into a shattered mess! WTF?
The 1/2" galvanized pipe exits the plumbing supply through a brick wall and the pipe exit was packed in with brick mortar.
So I chiseled out about six bricks to get to the junction of the output pipe. Damn! The 10" galvanized iron pipe was in excellent shape except where it passed through the mortar. Even in the area that was covered with mortar, the pipe's interior was in good shape. The corrosion was taking place from the outside inward.
It seems as if the mortar was eating the pipe. Bother!
About 200 cursewords later, I had the 10" access pipe replaced and turned the water back on. (It ain't easy getting a pipe wrench inside a wall.).
I noticed a teeny bit of moisture at another, nearby, faucet access pipe!
I carefully chiseled out the mortar surrounding THIS pipe and it started spewing like a beer can in the sun; same thing as the previous pipe. This pipe, as it passed through the mortar, was nothing but a thin layer of rust. Another 200-curseword job!
Anyway, the new pipes are now covered with a 1/4"-thick plastic tunnel as they pass through the brick veneer.
What I learned: 1. Mortar attacks galvanized pipes. 2. Pipes imbedded in mortar should be checked every 30 years and replaced if necessary.
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galvanized or not. What did you replace them with? Copper or PEX?
--
Best regards
Han
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It also attacks copper. That's why they stopped using copper in radiant floors a long time ago.
R
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Han wrote:

Experience demonstrates you are undoubtedly correct. Some of us didn't get the word, though.
I replaced the decomposed pipe with another galvanized pipe. The new pipe, however, is sheathed in 1/4" thick rubberized and nylon-reinforced plastic. As I put the bricks back, I plan to insulate even that from the surrounding bricks with foam.
Maybe even Kevlar.
As an aside, I found the HF Multifunction tool cuts through mortar quite easily - the blade's not long enough to reach all the way, but it provided a good start.
I figure I'm good for another 40 years. Unfortunately I have three more faucets to check...
Moan.
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Any pipes going through cement shold be place in a sleeve. IE: a larger pipe

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The same happened at my in laws house about 15 years ago. My father in law was pretty lucky, he was able to get the damaged pipes out with a EZ OUT. He replaced them with brass.
Jimmie
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Maybe bad galvanising or something else? Around here are 75-120+ year old homes, everyone has outdoor spigots mortared in that dont fall apart, mine are about 80 yrs.
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ransley wrote:

Don't touch them! Use only one eye when inspecting from a distance.
It's the mortar that's playing Little Dutch Boy and holding back the flood.
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Yup, and right next to the washer and dryer.
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aemeijers wrote:

Good question. The spigot is designed for use with a garden hose, so, unless there are folks with an unknown way of cleaning house, I presumed they were for outside use.

Oops! Is there something about a flange that's important, legal, useful, or deserving of artistic merit?

The latter is what I now have. Is there some deficiency with that arrangement?

We don't have freezes in my neighborhood (it was 104 yesterday), so I don't have the same concerns as you. You might start with a simple plumbing project (like changing the spigots on the outside faucets - yeah, right) and develop your skills through trial and error. And asking (or bitching about the result) here.
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HeyBub wrote:

'Garden Hose' style faucets are used inside all the time, especially in industrial/shop applications. The old concrete basement slop sinks usually had a threaded end, as do the faucets in the janitor closets in most large buildings such as schools. Modern washer-dryer hookups use basically the same fitting, as do most water softeners. The valves on my softener look almost exactly like what you just installed.
The flange is to reduce movement of the pipe where it goes through the wall, hide an oversize hole, and make it easier to seal around it.
Yeah, I could probably do basic plumbing if I had to. I have the knowledge in my head- but the fingers, not so smart any more. And the eyes, not so sharp for close work any more. Having more cashflow than time or enthusiasm these days, it is way too easy to rationalize hiring a pro, especially for categories of work I screwed up the last time I tried them.
-- aem sends...
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wrote:

I replaced a hose bib with the same 1/4 turn (valve) you have. Love it for easy off and on. You will enjoy it!!
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Oren wrote:

Thanks. I'm looking forward to it. I still have two more to do (out of five).
One of the outlets has two of these valves: one for the hose, the other for the pet's never-empty water dish. Poor outside kitties, in this ghastly heat wave, were sometimes reduced to standing under a neighbor's condensate overflow drain.
Now that an eternal supply of fresh water is available for the cats, maybe I should go thank my neighbor and tell her that her charity is no longer necessary and she can go ahead and get her A/C drain fixed.
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How old is the house?
I know of a 55 yr. old house with galvanized piping coming out of the brick with no signs of corrosion.
Andy
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WhiteTea wrote:

House was built in the late '60s. So I guess it's about 40 years old.
Maybe they used rosin-core mortar at the house at which you can't see the corrosion.
I just got back from buying a sack of mortar with which to replace the bricks. No warning on the bag about pipes, pets, or plants, so I guess I'm okay.
Aside--- Both Harbor Freight and Home Depot are open today. As are the day laborers in the HD parking lot. I even had one youngster stop me as I was leaving HD to ask if I needed help putting the 60-pound bag of mortar in my truck. He was either desperate for a tip or I look more feeble than I really am.
I WAS contemplating a lie-down but my pride's insulted. I'm gonna lay bricks -- even if it IS 104 outside! I'll show that pipsqueak!
Soon as I figure out how to get the bag of mortar OUT of my truck...
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HeyBub wrote:

I have noticed that the 60 pound bags of concrete mix are heavier than they used to be, so I blame the metric system.
Jon
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Jon Danniken wrote:

Quite interesting; on a little island on the righthand side of The Pond, after EU administrators said that they did not intend to disallow traditional units of measure, when going to the market we are now able to buy a lb. of mushrooms or whatever and that traders are proud to offer a bag of tomatoes (or other items) for sale. A victory, I think.
I do know what you mean about weights getting heavier. A neighbour was getting rid of paving slabs to reconfigure their backyard. Our houses were built at the same time by the same builder. The slabs are in the same condition as ours and my wife wanted to extend the patio. Got our elder kid to help me lift some to the front garden which I freely admit challenged me. I asked the younger lad (23) to get them into the yard, he's keen on phyical fitness and part of his business. To date there's one that he has not managed to move.
I'm guessing that I will have to shift that one!.
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Old age, cunning, and simple machines will win out. Every time.
--
Christopher A. Young
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That's because an English pound is 453 grams, a metric pound 500. More than a 10% increase. In my case it was a decrease, going from Dutch to US. But my poundage increased more than that. (1 beer only?)
--
Best regards
Han
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It's the magic fatten ray.
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