More strange electrical discoveries

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I mentioned a month or two back that I had discovered a circuit with a 20A breaker and #12 wire as far as the first junction box but #14 wire from that point on -- to a single duplex outlet.
Yet that is not the strangest thing: a couple of days ago I opened up the junction box to hook up additional outlets and saw connections with long cylindrical tape-covered doohickeys -- like over-long wire nuts, but cylindrical rather than tapered. When I removed the tape from the first one, I was surprised to see that it was bright green, unlike any wire nut I had ever seen, and with an "indented" closed end. The second one was identical except for the color -- more a blue-green.
After staring at them for a few minutes, I figured out what they were: the caps from some variety of "Magic Marker"!! And inside these DIY ("DESIGN It Yourself") insulators I found the wires laid side by side, with a loop of copper wire twisted tightly around them.
I have no idea whether these abominations were perpetrated by the immediately preceding owner (whose "Seller's Declaration" claimed that the only work he had done without obtaining a permit used the existing wiring) or by an earlier owner. But who would have been liable in the event of a fire attributed to faulty electrical work of this type?
MB
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Minnie Bannister wrote:

Now you know why most places require inspections of electrical work. ;-)
--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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Good one.
I was looking for a fault in a mobile home part, lots of rocks and BFR's. Found the fault in a suspicious place. Dug it up with a back hoe and found three gallon glass jugs filled with tar. The AL conductors stripped back about 6" and twisted together. Tie wire had been added in two places as an extra cinch. The whole thing had been put into a gallon glass jar then filled with tar and allowed to set. The owner of the park swore he did not do it. When I got out the crimpers and the proper crimps he made faces. He actually wanted me to put it back like I found it.
Anyone else got a goodie?
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In a basement "workshop" (the entire basement of an older home was considered the workshop) 2 very tightly strung picture wires running parallel about 12" apart, diagonally across the ceiling. Hung from each individual wire was a brass pulley soldered to a wire, the 2 wires into a male cord cap. 30a Fuse fed one of the picture wires, and the other was neutral. Could walk the "outlet" anywhere needed in the basement, and his wife used it for ironing.
Homeowner (son of deceased "handiman") said he was a machinist and copied the electrical "trolley" system used in the manufacturing plant that employed him.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (HA HA Budys Here) wrote in message

Man, that is a good one. Mine isn't as good. Previous homeowner of my last home didn't really have electrical skills but wanted two ceiling fans. There was an outlet wired near the access hatch to the attic presumably for a whole-house fan or a portable light. He bought two orange extension cords, hard wired them into the fans, then plugged them into the receptacle in the attic. Now, it's not to code for sure, but at least I can't really think of any danger in the practice.. nothing like the electrocusioner in your story.
Bob
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Crawling in a eave space behind a wall (A-Frames have a lot of wasted space, but ALL of my utilities are accessible without busting walls...neener-neener), I found a junction box for a wall outlet in the ajoining room with a 8" strand of lamp cord hanging out. It was hardwired to the outlet, and the pogue who commited the offence just clipped it off when it had served it's purpose. I suppose I'm lucky it didn't dangle onto my sweaty neck as I slithered past.
M
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I wonder what the outlet was for...
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040304 1508 - Mitch Skool posted:

I'll say...
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Drummer of The Vibe wrote:

Hey there's no problem with those wires in the basement. You just have to be short and rather dour. No raising your hand to shout in joy. :-)
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ITYM: not covered by code. Because it's connected by plugs, code doesn't cover it at all.
There's nothing wrong with the practise. Because it's really no different than buying a portable fan, plugging it in, and mounting the fan to something.
The danger is if the cords aren't attached to the fans properly with effective clamping and strain relief. Or if the cords can fall into the fan blades... But these aren't electrical code issues.
In the same sense, my shed is a "portable appliance". There's a bit of 120VAC wiring in it, but it only gets connected by an extension cord (occasionally) from the house.
_Theoretically_, a code inspector can't fault it. However, before being sold, by Canadian law, it has to be "approved". I'd have to rip the wiring out of the shed first before selling the house... [The shed isn't really portable ;-)]
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It's not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
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something.
effective
blades...
Hard wiring a ceiling fan with an extension cord most definitely _is_ covered by the NEC and a gross violation. Article 400 Flexible Cords and Cables. 400.8 Uses Not Permitted. (1) As a substitute for the fixed wiring of a structure.
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volts500 wrote:

That wasn't hardwired, it was just a long extension plugged into a receptacle.
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my
ceiling
sure,
different
It's hack wiring, period. Actually, it's hack wiring at it's _best_ since, obviously, some people, through their misunderstanding of basic NEC rules, seem to think that it's OK. You'll _never_ find an electrical inspector who will pass such an installation. Like I said, the general rule is that flexible cord shall _not_ be used as a substitute for fixed wiring. The fact that the extension cord passes through the ceiling is reason enough to disallow the installation. With your line of thinking one could wire the entire attic with extension cords as long as one used cord caps and receptacles.......NOT. Why not just use zip cord? Better yet, baling wire?
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volts500 wrote:

It may be hack wiring, whatever that is. However, "my line of thinking" didn't indicate anything about how things should be wired, the NEC rules, or whatever other fantasy you wish to invent. My comment only repeated what the OP said was the condition. I don't believe he said the cord passed through the ceiling either. I could see how the flexible cord wouldn't need to run the cord through any hole in the ceiling.
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So, what's your point then?

How else is the cord going to get from a receptacle in the attic to a room below the ceiling?
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volts500 wrote:

The point was his description was not an example of "hardwired" just a long extension cord.

On most ceiling fixtures the box is mounted above the ceiling with the mouth of the box even with the ceiling surface. The wire comes into the box above the ceiling, so technically it end in the box and does not pass through a hole in the ceiling.
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Is it not hardwired at one end?

room
Running the extension cord into a box leaves no doubt that the cord was used as a substitute for fixed wiring, which is not permitted.
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Your toaster is hardwired at one end.


The OP didn't say that the extension cord was wired into a box.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It's not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
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used
Everyone has the right to be stupid, but you are abusing the privilage.
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volts500 wrote:

Everyone has he right to be an anal-retentive dreamer who lives in a world where everything is 100% to code. You are doing good at it, keep up the good work.
--
No more big'uns for me, now I'm a 'Venture Capitalist'.
I've learned to totally appreciate 'Small Firms'.
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