More Snowblower Questions

What is the difference between a single stage and other kinds of snowblowers? Is one type more powerful?
Are there any features you would recommend, like a certain type of self propelled mechanism?
Anything else I should look for in a good snowblower?
I will be clearing about 2000sq feet in New Hampshire... Thanks!
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I bought a small one at Sears 5 years ago for $400. It clears my 1500sf of 6" of light snow in 20 minutes. And it is good exercise!
Okay, deep wet snow is difficult, but that has happened once in 5 years (Rochester NY). And I happen to like pushing, so perhaps someone else would need self propelled.
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Hi,
Simplicity makes the best snowblower there is for the price. Get a 8HP single stage unit and you eill be happy later you did.
candice
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jwill wrote:

A single stage uses the same parts to pick up the snow and to throw the snow. Generally this system is used on less powerful units. A two stage uses one part to pick up the snow and feed it to a second part the flings it. the two stage is usually used by more powerful machines.
The single stage/lower power is generally better for less demanding jobs. It is less expensive and complex.
I have a mid size electric using a single stage system. Last year I used it in up to 15" of snow. I was greatly suprised and impressed. It worked like a charm. No gas or starting problems, easy to use and move. If I had a quarter mile long drive, I would want something bigger, but as I have a typical surburban home, it is just perfect. It blasted that snow all the way off the middle of a two car driveway.

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Joseph E. Meehan

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The impeller of a two stage has nothing to do with how clean it scraps the driveway. That is set by lower the scarper blade. The only trouble with offbeat brands is when it's time to get parts you won't be able to.
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Consumer reports rates them, but not actually for wet snow , they obviously screwed the pooch on this one, my neighbor and I bought the 2nd rated Deere single stage , 750.00 and it clogs in wet 32 degree snow, its a pain in the butt......and wallett
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As you have gotten a LOT of very fine replies, I won't redundantly repeat them over and over.
What little they didn't say (so far) is:
* There seem to be four different power sources for a snow blower. 1) Two cycle engine, mix gas and oil 2) Four cycle engine, oil in the crank case 3) Electric 4) Power take off from garden tractor
* Sizes are rated in inch of cut (width) and also in horse power. More HP means more power, but burns gas/ electric faster. You get the job done faster, and I doubt that a big unit actually uses more gas, over the course of the year.
Several years ago, I got bombed in snow, and for the first time tried out an electric snow thrower I'd found on the curb a couple years before that. It worked so well, I was completely impressed.
Since then I bught a two cycle gas mixer, which is about 3 HP. I just simply totally love it! I snow blow my own driveway, the driveway for the elderly lady across the street, and some for the truck driver (who got hurt in a wreck) across the street. As well as a little trim work for a couple other neighbors.
Buying a snow blower doesn't obligate you to clear your neighbor's driveway, though. You may choose to if you wish.
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Christopher A. Young
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On Wed, 03 Sep 2003 22:27:31 GMT, "Peter Young"

Also have an MTD bought back in '96 from COSTCO. Worked fine last winter with the heavier than normal snow.
Regardless of brand I think it is quite important to do the basics like lubrication, oil change, and fresh fuel. Every few years strip things down to clean and lube axles and such.
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Single stage are powered by the auger,, dual stage have driven powered wheels . What YOU need is dictated by your area Talk to a dealer for your needs , hp is relevant to YOUR situation and area . Wet snow needs 1hp per inch , dry snow 1/2 as much. Honestly , talk to a few dealers in your area to get their ideas...and buy their recomendations
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