More on that runaway Prius...

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On Mar 15, 9:55 am, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

== I have seen situations where people have had their seats set too far back from the steering wheel which reduces the power that could be applied to the brake pedal. Mind you most of these people where fairly obese and their bellies too large. Nevertheless this could be a factor in stopping a run-a-way vehicle. ==
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IME most newer cars have the opposite problem - when you set the seat so that you have a comfortable reach to the steering wheel, your feet are too *close* to the pedals. My older cars do not have this problem. I do not know why this is, but my theory is that it is due to concerns about airbag deployment. nate
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Same here with my Ford 500. I cannot achieve a happy medium. Drove a recent Focus as a loaner (f150 in for major tune-up) today and one would have to be a freak to be really comfortable.
Harry K
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Agree; could be a factor. saw a guy in a bank recently who had a stomach so large he looked pregnant with triplets! Don't know how he could even reach the steering wheel! Saw a TV programme, many years ago, on TV, about an advanced driving course, where the students were learning how to skid their vehicle's rear wheels. One petite female student couldn't be taught to apply the brakes hard enough to lock the back wheels. Until the instructors discovered that the seat in her particular car (IIRC it might have been one of those older smaller Fords that used to catch fire if rear-ended?) could not be moved far enough forward for her to apply the brake pedal fully. She had been driving for some time before that. And seemingly had not been applying the brakes fully even in a crash stop' situation'! Don't remember much else about the course except that by putting a pillow behind her back she was able to apply the brakes fully! Scary; eh?
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On Mar 15, 11:55 am, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

I agree, I had a hot 327 Chevy Impala run away with me when the motor mounts broke. Standing on the brakes choked the engine down. Since the computer also controls braking on the Prius I wouldn't doubt if that is malfunctioning too.
Jimmie
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Did you see the latest on the news tonight? He hit the brakes many times in short burst (probably to heat them up) not in the long "stand on" he stated. Seems they wee found to be working properly.
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JIMMIE wrote:

A computer gets involved for regenerative braking. You think there are no brakes with a dead battery?
If you push hard on the pedal you get mechanical hydraulic braking - just like on any car when the power brakes fail.
This was verified by a Prius dealer service rep.
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wrote:

At this point, anybody who gets a paycheck connected to Toyota is automatically disqualified as a trusted source. They have a massive motive to mislead in any way possible.
Has any one proved that the ABS system couldn't possibly malfuntion and rapidly "pump the brakes" causing it to appear as if the driver had done so, when in fact, all he did was stand on the brakes?
Didn't think so.
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snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Do you think it is reasonable that there is not a mechanical-hydraulic base function at the bottom of the pedal travel, just like there is on every car with power brakes - stops the car if the 'power' function fails?

So there was a failure in the throttle control and another failure in the ABS control? (Maybe they are Windows applications.) And this person had both failures? (Prius is one of the cars that has had throttle runaway.) And this person, coincidentally, also refused to shift into neutral as he was told numerous times?
The California runaway is sounding more each day like fraud.
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wrote:

It's entirely possible that they are related, and one failure caused multiple systems to misbehave.
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snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

That is why representatives from the Highway Safety people were also involved, not just Toyota.

Yes, if you read up on them and how they work. You should also look at the report and how they determined the brakes were manually applied, not by the ABS. My guess is the driver had no idea how much information is recorded on his car and if he did, he would not have tried the fraud.
It may take some time, but he is probably going to share a cell with Balloon Boy in the future.
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Nonsense. Ballon Boy was just a innocent kid, doing what daddy told him.
Daddy? Maybe.
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wrote:

I think people know who I was referring to (except for you)
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???? Never heard of such a thing. I can turn off the key in every car I ever drove and it will keep on down the road until momentum runs out.
Harry K
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Harry K wrote:

In any car with power brakes, if the power brakes fail and you push the pedal hard the brakes are applied by a simple mechanical-hydraulic system, just like before power brake assist was invented. If the power function fails, you still have the mechanical backup (but it takes a more pedal pressure).
It is inconceivable that Prius would not have that function as a backup on its brake system (which has a computer to control regeneration). My reading of post I responded to is that since Prius brakes are computer controlled, if you loose the computer you have no brakes.
Brakes are, of course, only applied when you push the pedal.
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The Prius (and similar hybrids) are a whole different animal and I don't know much about them. There fore I usually don't comment on their specific controls.
The 'loose power and it stops the car' is too far out there though... I had to admire my 70 year old mother. She lost the water pump on a junker of a Mercury station wagon with power everything. I pushed her almost 20 miles including through a twon with 3 stop lights. In retrospect I should have paid for a tow.
Harry K
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wrote:

computer quits or goes "APE"
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On Thu, 18 Mar 2010 16:51:46 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Unless they don't.
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Could you give us a scenario where the computer will override the hydraulic system? Does something stop the master cylinder from making pressure?
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Antiskid brakes are the best example. The electronics release the brakes when the tire begins to skid. What happens when the electronics go crazy? Who knows?
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