More grounding rod questions

The way I understand the information that has been posted so far is that the grounding rod(s) should be connected to the main breaker box. I live in South Arkansas and here the electrical services I have seen have a grounding round under the electrical meter. For a 200amp service a bare #4 wire is run from the meter can to the grounding rod. The service into the breaker box is only three 00 wires. Two hots and a neutral. Other services such as cable and phone run wires usually around #10 and clamp on to the bare ground wire. Is this not right. Has been several months since I helped do one, but in the past all have pasted inspection.
Thanks Robert
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the
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I believe everything you said is correct per the NEC. They are some other issues that could be wrong, but you didn't mention them.
-- Mark Kent, WA
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the
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The power co. has the final say about whether they will hook up power to a building. The electric service must be built to _their_ specifications. There is usually collaboration between the power co.'s requirements and the local electrical inspection authority (AHJ....Authority Having Jurisdiction).......IOW, the local electrical inspector will not pass something that he know's won't be acceptable to the power co. For example, entire the State of Florida is under the 1999 NEC. The 1999 NEC, or 2002 for that matter, does not require that a lightning protector be installed at the electric service.......BUT the power co.(TECO) _does_require one.......and will _not_ hook up a service that doesn't have one. Once a homeowner or electrical contractor calls in an inspection to the AHJ, after it passes that inspection, the AHJ calls it in to the power co. The power co. then sends out _their_ inspector. If it passes their inspection, _only_ then will the service be hooked up. Most people don't see the power co. inspector, as they are usually in and out before anyone knows they were there (it's already been scrutinized by the AHJ and they are just confirming compliance.)
Same goes for the GEC (Grounding Electrode Conductor) in my area......the _power co._ requires that the GEC come out of the meter. As far as the discussion going on in here, there isn't much difference where the GEC is connected (either at the meter or the main panel), the _principles_being discussed are still the same. Just depends on where the power co. (and the AHJ) wants the connection......besides, the main panel (or disconnect) isn't usually very far from the meter.
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