MONSTER MUSHROOMS above ground-down-below-ground tree-trunk

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On 6/26/2011 9:41 AM, Jon Danniken wrote:

that creates healthy soil.
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On 26 Jun 2011 03:31:38 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (David Combs) wrote:

Yes. Please take pictures! Pictures of them undisturbed is all you need. Simply put the jpgs at your Panix website* and post the links.
* I looked at it. Seems to be filled with junk files.
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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True enough!

David
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"David Combs" wrote in message
Very large tree got sick and had to come down.
Then the usual "grinding-down of the stump". (I then paid more and got it ground down even more, to maybe 1 foot beneath the surface.)
Around the (alive) tree was a rock-edged circle, radius maybe 6 feet, ground within raised up maybe 6 inches.
Anyway, after the tree was taken down and stump ground way down, we turned that rock-edged circle into a garden, lots of different plants, flowers, etc.
--

Lots of rain in the last two or three weeks. So of course some mushrooms
appear here and there in the lawn. SMALL mushrooms.
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David Combs wrote:

A foot across! - I'M DROOLING!
Best I can ever get is a chicken-of-the-woods about the size of a grapefruit.
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On Sun, 26 Jun 2011 17:28:43 -0400, "Bob(but not THAT Bob)"

There is a chicken of the woods that has showed up on a pine tree in a local park 3 years in a row. I'd wager that there are 20 pounds of mushrooms on that thing before it starts to fade.
The down side is-- it is a few yards from the dog park & a popular tree to mark. So I just watch and drool. [and wonder if the big ones we see in the woods are marked by critters we don't see.<g>]
Jim
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"Jim Elbrecht" wrote in message wrote:-snip-

There is a chicken of the woods that has showed up on a pine tree in a local park 3 years in a row. I'd wager that there are 20 pounds of mushrooms on that thing before it starts to fade.
The down side is--it is a few yards from the dog park & a popular tree to mark. So I just watch and drool. [and wonder if the big ones we see in the woods are marked by critters we don't see.<g>]
Jim === But then, when you think about how much of the other vegs we eat every day are hit by birds....
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wrote:

So you think there are invisible animals in the woods? Are they invisible dogs or some unknown animal, like wolyotes?

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-snip-
Just a few Whitewalkers in my woods.<g>
Jim
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I've seen them bigger. But often no longer fresh. Wondering if he had a chicken-of-the-woods is why I asked for a picture.
Note to David: Also post where you are located. That could help id them. Though little brown ones generally can't be identified and are assumed poisonous.
Don. http://foraging.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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On 6/26/2011 7:03 PM, Don Wiss wrote:

When y'all starting talking chicken-of-the-woods, my first thought was of the Giant Brown Chickens (aka wild turkeys) that hang out in the woods behind my place. Damn near tame, from the old widow lady next door putting out a wash tub of feed every couple of days. I've seen upwards of 30 at a time.
In the Baltic states of northern Europe, where my family came from, mushroom hunting is a big annual deal, and little kids learn the safe ones by the time they are school age. My family neglected to teach me that, or maybe they weren't sure of the species on this side of the pond, so I just look, but don't eat. With all the storm-downed trees here this month, I'm expecting to see plenty of them come late summer. Last summer, one guy a block away had a front yard of adorable spherical ones, 3-8 inches in diameter before the caps unfurled. Looked like a science-fiction cityscape.
--
aem sends...

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Here is what chicken mushrooms look like: http://foragingpictures.com/plants/Chicken_mushroom /
They are very edible and taste like chicken.
Don. http://foraging.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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wrote:

That makes a big difference. Did you hear about the family recently from China, I think it was, a few years ago who thought they knew what was safe to eat, and they all died.

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David Combs wrote:

You could just leave them. They won't be there long and their presence adds a quaintness and unique feature to your lawn.
They might even attract fairies and leprechauns.
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Thanks, all.
Didn't get to look at the responses until just now.
Maybe "mushroom" is the wrong word.
(Too dark now for photo -- will do it tomorrow morning.)
It doesn't look like a real mushroom -- stalk plus hat, like what you buy at the store.
Each one looks like a cauliflower, sort of.
David
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Sounds like "The Brain from Planet Arous"
http://www.stomptokyo.com/badmoviereport/reviews/B/arous.html
-- Bobby G.
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On Mon, 27 Jun 2011, snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (David Combs) wrote:

Was the cut down tree an oak?
Did you look at the pictures of the chicken mushroom?
Here is a page on them: http://www.messiah.edu/Oakes/fungi_on_wood/poroid%20fungi/species%20pages/Laetiporus%20sulphureus.htm
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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On Sun, 26 Jun 2011 03:31:38 -0400, David Combs wrote:

Buy a book from the Audubon Society and look those shrooms up. A lot of times they are edible. We harvest Hen of the Woods around fallen Oak, Morels in the spring. And horse or fairy ring mushrooms in the fall. By the bushels. I would never come out and recommend you eat wild mushrooms but with the right research you could have a goldmine. I sell annually over $1000 bucks worth of wild mushroom but I was taught by the old timers what is edible and isn't. Plus some edibles look very similar to poisonous varieties. Especially with the Morels.
I wouldn't worry much about what you have. Unless you've got little kids or animals who are inquisitive who might be tempted to eat what you have.
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snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (David Combs) writes:

I had a tree cut down but left the stump. I get mushrooms about half a foot across. I don't touch them but I think they look pretty cool:
http://mysite.verizon.net/despen/mushroom.jpg
but my favorites are in a lawn a few feet away:
http://mysite.verizon.net/despen/mushrooms.jpg
Wouldn't attempt to kill them. They're good for the soil.
If they really bother you, cut off the top with a shovel. Only takes a few seconds. If they come back and they still bother you do the same. I would not attempt to go after the underground structure, it's probably a waste of time.
Grew up near New Rochelle (in the Bronx not far from the Pelham Manor border). Spent a lot of time on Shore Road and the surrounding woods. Spectacular area. Used to swim in the Eastchester River.
--
Dan Espen

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On Sun, 26 Jun 2011 22:13:32 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net wrote:

Looks like edible Collybia butyracea. See: http://foragingpictures.com/plants/Collybia_butyracea/h0001.htm

Looks like Mica cap mushrooms. Turns into black ink. Not poisonous, but not good to eat. See: http://foragingpictures.com/plants/Mica_cap /
Don. http://foraging.com (e-mail link at page bottom).
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