MONSTER MUSHROOMS above ground-down-below-ground tree-trunk

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Very large tree got sick and had to come down.
Then the usual "grinding-down of the stump". (I then paid more and got it ground down even more, to maybe 1 foot beneath the surface.)
Around the (alive) tree was a rock-edged circle, radius maybe 6 feet, ground within raised up maybe 6 inches.
Anyway, after the tree was taken down and stump ground way down, we turned that rock-edged circle into a garden, lots of different plants, flowers, etc.
--

Lots of rain in the last two or three weeks. So of course some mushrooms
appear here and there in the lawn. SMALL mushrooms.
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On 26 Jun 2011 03:31:38 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (David Combs) wrote:
FWIW, your capital letters made me thingk this was spam.

Don't eat them.

For sure don't eat them. :)
If they're not round, I call them toadstools.

Won't they stop on their own? Wash them away with one of those narrow squirt nozzles for garden hoses? The one I have in mind is 2 to 3" long, usually all brass, and has no handle or valve or anything, though you can screw it onto a separate valve.
Destroying them this way will help get out any anger you're feeling about anything, especially them.

They go a lot lower than that! AIUI, the mustroom shows up when the below ground part is running out of food. Since the tree is gone, its roots are iiuc rotting rather than living. Maybe that somehow means less food for the mushroom.
Semding up mushrooms is it's last ditch "effort" to live, somewhere else.

I think eventually they stop.
Wikip "Though mushroom fruiting bodies are short-lived, the underlying mycelium can itself be long-lived and massive. A colony of Armillaria solidipes (formerly known as Armillaria ostoyae) in Malheur National Forest in the United States is estimated to be 2,400 years old, possibly older, and spans an estimated 2,200 acres (8.9 km2). Most of the fungus is underground and in decaying wood or dying tree roots in the form of white mycelia combined with black shoelace-like rhizomorphs that bridge colonized separated woody substrates.[15]"
I don't think yours will last more than a few years, showing up only once in a while during that time. Where do you live?

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New York State (New Rochelle, just north of the BRONX)
David
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"David Combs" wrote in message wrote:

New York State (New Rochelle, just north of the BRONX)
David ===That narrows it down to about 10,000 species.
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PICTURES!!!
go to www.cuffs88.com/mushrooms
I tried to take a stereo-pair, by shooting one, then moving the camera left 3 or 4 inches, and shooting again.
Actually, I tried that twice (on a different mushroom), but I think somehow it didn't get included (one of the two of the 2nd stereo pair).
And one shot across the garden (from maybe 4 ft height), so you can see that there's a four or five in that one shot.
Anyway, looks to me that they're all the same type.
So, what conclusion do YOU GUYS come up with?
Thanks,
David
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"David Combs" wrote in message
PICTURES!!!
go to www.cuffs88.com/mushrooms
I tried to take a stereo-pair, by shooting one, then moving the camera left 3 or 4 inches, and shooting again.
Actually, I tried that twice (on a different mushroom), but I think somehow it didn't get included (one of the two of the 2nd stereo pair).
And one shot across the garden (from maybe 4 ft height), so you can see that there's a four or five in that one shot.
Anyway, looks to me that they're all the same type.
So, what conclusion do YOU GUYS come up with?
Thanks,
David == Curious to see what all THE GUYS come up with!
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On 6/27/2011 9:28 PM, David Combs wrote:

try adding a lot of lime to the soil....fungi tend to like damp, acid soil. Why kill them? Treat 'em like wild flowers, add some moss and ferns and you have a really cool flower bed. Whatever wood beneath the soil that nourishes them will have to rot away.
When I did nature photography in Florida, I once found a huge fungus similar to yours...the only day I was ever out without my camera...that looked like a giant carnation. About two feet across, light peachy/pink color, growing on a fallen live-oak log. There were lots of interesting fungi (and spider webs) in the woods, and mushrooms seemed to be a favorite food of squirrels and mice.
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On 6/28/2011 8:37 AM, snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net wrote:

Forgot to paste in this link: http://www.weekendgardener.net/plant-diseases/mushrooms-090809.htm
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When I did nature photography in Florida, I once found a huge fungus similar to yours...the only day I was ever out without my camera...that looked like a giant carnation. About two feet across, light peachy/pink color, growing on a fallen live-oak log. There were lots of interesting fungi (and spider webs) in the woods, and mushrooms seemed to be a favorite food of squirrels and mice. ===That would definitely describe a well-aged Laetiporus, in case you wanted to know. (I don't mind sharing knowledge with people who don't insist on it only being from males.)
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On 6/28/2011 2:25 PM, Nelly wrote:

Thanks for that - I looked up "Laetiporus" in google images and found quite a few. I'd love to be able to grow stuff like that - just started some basil and chives from seed in potting soil...got a lot of tiny mushrooms that pop up and then disappear. Would have tried planting morel spores in the same soil if I could have found morels; no luck. How did you happen to know the name of what I described?
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wrote in message
On 6/28/2011 2:25 PM, Nelly wrote:

Thanks for that - I looked up "Laetiporus" in google images and found quite a few. I'd love to be able to grow stuff like that - just started some basil and chives from seed in potting soil...got a lot of tiny mushrooms that pop up and then disappear. Would have tried planting morel spores in the same soil if I could have found morels; no luck. How did you happen to know the name of what I described? ===Same reason I know what the OP has. I've been doing this for over 20 years.
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"Nelly" wrote in message
On 6/28/2011 2:25 PM, Nelly wrote:

Thanks for that - I looked up "Laetiporus" in google images and found quite a few. I'd love to be able to grow stuff like that - just started some basil and chives from seed in potting soil...got a lot of tiny mushrooms that pop up and then disappear. Would have tried planting morel spores in the same soil if I could have found morels; no luck. How did you happen to know the name of what I described? ===Same reason I know what the OP has. I've been doing this for over 20 years. -Besides realizing how curt that might've sounded, I wanted to add that growing mushrooms isn't quite as simple as spreading spores around. In the case of wood-rotters such as Laetiporus, by the time a tree is dead it's already been colonized by something else. I have OTOH grown oysters (Ostreatus, another wood eater), simply by bringing an already-fruiting log home & keeping it damp. If you happen to find a Laetiporus nearby, it's quite possible that could work too (I have no experience here).
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On Mon, 27 Jun 2011 01:14:25 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (David Combs) wrote:

Say hello to the Petris when you see them.

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And who are they?
FYI: we live 2.5 houses east of the south end of "Beechmond Lake" (pond), on Beechmont. Well, 2.5 houses east of where Pinebrook Blvd goes North (one way -- goes south (also one way) along the west side of the "lake").
David
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On Tue, 28 Jun 2011 01:34:21 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (David Combs) wrote:

Of course I confused things. I misspelled their name. Rob and Laura Petrie. Rob's a writer for the Alan Brady show, and they have a son, Richie.
They live at 148 Bonnie Meadow Road, next to Jerry and Millie Halper, although it's possible by now they moved to a bigger home, or even a smaller one now that Richie is out of the house.
They must be well known in the community after 50 years. Although maybe I heard that Richie lives in the house and they moved to Manhattan. I'm so confused. Please have them write me.

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snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (David Combs) wrote:
-snip-

What kind of tree? where are you in the world? and a picture or two. Get one from under the 'monsters' if you can.
Maybe I [or someone closer] will come over and harvest them for you.
Jim
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Huge, old, beautiful BEECH tree.

Took pictures today, and they're now at www.cuffs88.com/mushrooms.
David
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First, it would help to identify them (and thus identify the underground fungus structures you cannot see.) The fastest route would be to take photos (with a ruler in each picture to indicate scale or size) and show them to a "mycologist" at either an Agricultural Extension department (governmental) or the Biology Dept. of some local college.
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
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On 6/26/2011 2:31 AM, David Combs wrote:

You are aware that if you disturb a mushroom by whacking with a shovel, it will release an abundance of spores that will spread over your property. Check out this gardening site for some easy to understand information about mushrooms on your lawn:
http://www.weekendgardener.net/plant-diseases/mushrooms-090809.htm
TDD
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David Combs wrote:

Why would you want to? Mychorrizal organisms of any type are very beneficial to the soil, helping to break down substances into usable material for other plants; this is why many species of trees (especially coniferous) actualy depend upon a healthy mychorrizal colony for their survival and nutrition.
If you have indeed planted a garden at the area, you would be best served to leave them be. They will decrease in number in time, as the last remnants of your tree are consumed, and in the meantime will provide a healthy environment for the plants and soil which will continue to live.
Jon
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