Mold/mildew in shower

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Hate to have to ask about something so trivial-sounding, but ...
If I get mold/mildew on the grout in the shower, I can scrub it off with Tilex and an old toothbrush.
Such approach doesn't work at all for m/m on the tub caulk, and I dunno why.
Any ideas?
Thx, Peetie
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wrote:

use straight bleach. that kills mold dead.
unless the caulk has permanetely discolored, in which case replace it
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Yep, Tilex is nothing but watered down, overpriced, bleach.
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Peetie Wheatstraw wrote:

can trap soap scum, water and whatever else is in the shower - mildew grows in what is trapped. Wiping with straight bleach might get rid of the mildew, and leaving the shower open to air circulation when not in use should help. I recently started using Scrubbin Bubbles in our shower - much better results with much less work than Tilex or CLR. CLR is still very good for lime.
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It is opaque white caulk that was applied around the tub top about 2 years ago. The black stuff (presumed mold/mildew) is on the surface of the caulk.
I fairly drowned it in Clorox, scrubbed with an old toothbrush. Had no effect at all.
Shot a few inches of it with Scrubbing Bubbles 3 times and scrubbed. Like water off a duck's back.
Aside from mold/mildew, I dunno what it could be, but it doesn't come off with any of the household chemicals discussed here.
Peetie
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wrote:

Replace the caulk with silicone.
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Peetie Wheatstraw wrote:

The ease and inexpensiveness of replacing the caulk around your tubor any other appliance in your home makes this an easy solve.
Tools you will need: A putty knife or other tool to remove old caulk. New caulk. A damp sponge or rag.
1. Get a putty knife or a flat head screw driver or even a butter knife and scrape all the old caulk out. Make sure that you remove all of it off the walls and edge of tub, so the new caulk has a clean place to adhere. 2. Spray some bleach diluted with water around the edge to kill whatever mildew is still left, allow to air dry. 3. While waiting for the bleach to dry go to your closest hardware store and get some tub and tile caulk, prefferably made from silicone. How much you will need depends on the size of your tub. Most stores carry a tube that you squeeze by hand or you can buy a caulk gun to apply the new caulk. Either way works just fiine. 4. Once the area is COMPLETELY CLEAN AND DRY, you can begin applying the new caulk. this is an easy process, although it can be quite messy if not done right. 5. Begin applying the caulk making sure to squeeze some, but not too much down in the crack between the tub and the wall. Try to use a nice even pressure while doing this. Go all the way around the tub trying not to put more than about a 1/4 inch bead of caulk as you go. Some areas will have a larger gap and you will need to apply more caulk to the area. 6. For the final step some people use their finger and a damp rag, or a sponge. You want to take your index finger and put it inside the rag kind of like you where going to shine a shoe or something. And wipe all the way around the tub using slight pressure and a smooth stroke. Or just wipe with the sponge using the same pressure and stroke. This will imbed the caulk and make a smooth professional appearance. Do not use too much pressure or the caulk will begin to squeeze out of the area of applicatioin. Clean up any mess with your rag. Allow to dry for the time period suggested by the manufacturer. 7. Enjoy your clean tub.
Some stores also carry M/M resistant caulk.
Good Luck, Mike
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Sho'ly, sho'ly ...

Pert near what I did 2 years ago, except I individually tried to seal where the caulk met the grout between the tiles, and I filled the tub while it dried. It wasn't pretty.
It is a Royal and Monumental PITA. And I gotta bad back.
Peetie
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wrote:

DO NOT replace caulk with caulk, you will only have the same problem in the near future. Replace it with silicone NOT caulk. Lou
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Was silicone caulk that's been used for the last 2 years.
Peetie
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clipped

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Make sure the caulk is marked mold and mildue resistant.
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wrote:

Insufficient ventilation? Area needs to be warmer and dryer?
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Door stays open 99.99% of the time.
No problem elsewhere in house, including kitchen. Standard forced-air HVAC.
P
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Silicone, IS, caulk.
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clipped

lubricant...........:o)
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Anyone who thinks silicone and caulk are the same need to wake up and learn something. If you replace the crap in your bathroom with the same crap, you will have the problems. Lou
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OK, if you say so.
http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=howTo&p=Improve/appcaulk.html#2
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Lou wrote:

Where did you learn this? Silicone is a type of caulk, period. Go learn something yourself before you make comments like this.
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This whole process is very clear, but what I do BEFORE starting Step 5 if I'm feeling anal about having a straight caulk line is to lay down masking or painter's tape right about where I'd like the line to be. Then after Step 6, pull up the tape, and voila, a nice neat caulk job.
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