Moisture inside window panes - a temporary fix ?

I have a few 12+ year old double-hung Appleby windows that are gettting moisture between the panes. They are out of warranty of course, so I think its either a) live with it b) replacement sashes from Appleby c) new frames or d) modify the existing sashes to vent the moisture. Recommendations anyone ? The last one seems off-the-wall, but I recall that Pellas in a previous home had small vent holes in the bottom of the sashes and they would fog up if not cleaned out periodically. I could easily add small vent holes to the failed Appleby's and sacrifice some thermal efficiency, but at least be able to see out the windows. Has anyone tried this ? Thanks in advance for your thoughts and advice on this.
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If you are taliking about insulating glass units, you can have the glass replaced. Call a glass deale. Around here they will measure the units, order and deliver. Some will install. TB
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wrote:

I would contact Appleby. Tell them you love your appleby windows, but you are disapointed with the fact that some of them have experienced seal failure, and you thought Appleby's were made so that should never have happened. (They brag about their seals never going bad) They may surprise you!
rusty redcloud
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I could not tell if you meant you had 'dual pane sealed unit' double hung windows - or single pane glass.
Assuming you meant 'dual pane sealed units' - If you get no satisfaction from the window manufacturer - and if you are 'handy' - you could try the following:
On a sunny, warm/hot day (with low relative humidity), remove the dual pane sealed glass unit from the window frame (taking appropriate precautions to not drop the unit).
Then, using a razor knife, cut the caulking holding one of the glass panes onto the glass spacer, clean the inside surfaces well and leave the open unit sitting in the sun to bake any moisture off of it. Having a fan blow on it might hasten the drying process.
After a couple of hours in the sun, re-assemble the glass pane onto the glass spacer and re-seal it with good quality silicone. Let it dry and re-mount the window in the frame.

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I suppose that it's worth giving Appleby a shot. To TB's question, I am talking about double pane inulating glass....no gas inside back then, just two panes with a seal I believe. I wasn't aware that glass dealers were handling sealed double panes, but it makes perfect sense. I guess all of the window dealers' incessant marketing over the years had me thinking every make is unique. Thanks for that advice; I will go that route if Appleby has nothing to offer. TB and Rusty, thanks for your inputs...truly appreciated.

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