Moisture inside double pane windows

Approximately 8 years ago I replaced all of the windows in my Florida home with double pane windows. A few years ago I noticed one of the windows started to collect moisture internal to the two panes of glass and became cloudy which was apparently due to the seals leaking. Now, more than half of the windows in the home have the same problem. My question is can one of the panes be permanently removed on these windows or is there a difference between this and regular single pane windows? Thanks in advance for any info. Ron
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R Miller wrote:

The double pane windows are filled with dry nitrogen or argon or some of the more costly noble gases to eliminate moisture build up and to decrease the heat transfer rate through the window. If you are getting moisture, this means the seal between the panes is gone and your panes are now filled with air. The window is shot and unless is covered under warranty as are mine for a lifetime, youre up the creek. These cannot be repaired, the double pane is integrated into the frame.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

They are? I have had 3 panes replaced (one twice) with no problem.
Harry K
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R Miller wrote:

First step is to determine if the glass in covered by warrantee. If not then the only fix is to replace it. It is possible to replace it with single pane glass is some cases, but in most I believe you will find that will not work.
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Joseph Meehan

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Joseph Meehan wrote:

After reading Harry's reply to ceraboy I see my response was no more clear than ceraboy's was.
I can't talk for ceraboy but my experience is that the glass portion of any window unit is replaceable without replacing the entire unit. It is often not apparent how this may be done, but the professional can usually do it and with a little work and knowledge even us non-professional types can usually do it.
Often a part of the window unit can be removed and brought to the shop where they can make up a new glass part and install it for you. Even if you are able to remove the glass yourself, it is best if you can bring that into the shop so they can match the original.
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Joseph Meehan

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quoted from: http://www.windowrepair.com/replace.html
Double insulated glass replacement must be performed by glass specialists in their shop. Most jobs can be handled by any local glass shop, the type that also do car windshields.
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borgunit wrote:

For some you may be right. Not for all. Mine were replaced in situ. The glass shop first came out and measured for the replacement tho.
Harry K
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As a last resort, if not under warrantee, and before trying to replace them as the others suggest:
Remove the thermopane unit, drill a hole through the seperator strip, insert silica gel desiccating agent (ie: flower drying powder, or a couple packets from your last hifi purchase ;-)), and reseal the hole, you _might_ be able to get them to defog.
It's reported to work, but it's not likely to be permanent.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
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Chris Lewis wrote:

Another hack way to squeeze another year or so out of them is to drill two or three of 3/16" holes very close to the bottom the outer pane with a glass drill. (Easier than it sounds.)
Yo won't get the insulation value of a new window, but the inside fog will go away. Eventually, a film of dirt will build up on the insides and make you really want to get a new window.
Lots of us grew up using separate "storm windows" we had to put on every fall and take off in the spring. They sure weren't sealed and filled with gas, but they did help a lot.
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia

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